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3

The short answer is "No" the AoA of the horizontal stabilizer is not the same as the AoA of the wing. For the aircraft to remain in the air the AoA of the wing must be positive. if a positive AoA were seen by the Hstab, positive lift would also be produced by the tail, but a downforce is required from the tail in order to stabilize the aicraft. ...


4

If the wing center of pressure is perfectly positioned over the center of gravity, the tail will rotate around the center of gravity until it is in a zero lift condition. Normally, CG is set slightly forward of wing CP, requiring some tail downforce. Therefore the tail is doing two jobs in straight and level flight, maintaining wing AOA and keeping the net ...


5

It might have something to do with the super stall phenomenon in which a stalled wing blankets a T-tail.


13

A horizontal tail on top of vertical tail would require strong and heavy structures, which in turn is not good for economics of flight. The bigger the plane is, the more challenging the loads the tail has to handle are, so what might be a feasible solution on a regional jet might not work at all for a large jet. T-tails are an obvious choice when the ...


4

Convair worked very hard to develop a light multiservice aircraft with STOL capabilities. The short wingspan does not appear "normal" in proportion because prop wash and high lift devices were used extensively to improve lift. Power on, the wing lived in a higher airspeed environment than the tail (lift is proportional to V$^2$). The model 48 ...


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