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25

The "sudden upward tail movement" requires nothing more than a sudden unloading of the tail by removing that 90+ kg of man, parachute, and money. Even with an aircraft as large as a 727, suddenly removing 90+ kg from the tailcone airstair would result in a pretty noticeable shift in trim requirement, with additional tail downforce required to restore level ...


22

The answer to both of your questions is "yes". The FAA ordered, in effect, the installation of "Cooper Vanes" and did do so in 1972. The reason you could not find the answer may have been that the modifications were not called "Cooper Vanes" by the FAA and nor was the FAA targeting the 727 specifically. Instead they addressed ventral and tailcone exits on ...


22

The same thing that prevents the passengers in your car from hijacking it and using it to run people down or drive it through a mall: It's your private car and you generally know the people that you let in to it. The same applies to private aircraft.


13

What security measures are in place to prevent unauthorized passenger access to the controls of private jets? None. The passengers outnumber the pilots, and unlike commercial jets are not outnumbered by passengers who prefer the original scheduled route to the new one. It would also be very easy to arrange pickup at a quiet airstrip, kill the crew, stuff ...


7

United Airlines Flight 93 history shows that melee weapons are not very efficient: the passengers that are likely to outnumber hijackers at least ten to one can win if they are willing to fight. The question remains, how likely is that passengers will go into risks to show the resistance. If it is just about changing the course to land in the different ...


7

In the US, the ATC protocol for hijackings is classified for reasons of national security. 10-2-6 Hijacked aircraft Hijack attempts or actual events are a matter of national security and require special handling. Policy and procedures for hijack situations are detailed in FAAO JO 7610.4, Special Operations.‡ FAAO JO 7610.4 describes reporting ...


6

There are two answers. Practically speaking: no. Technically speaking: yes, but only if they meet little to no resistance from the passengers or crew. Passengers in the US have proven on several occasions that they will fight (and even kill) troublemakers on airliners. Many flight crews are armed, too. I think passengers understand that "modern" ...


6

The difference in security measures is due to the difference in the passengers. Commercial airlines could carry almost anyone as passengers. Although some amount of security is done on the ground, and in the air, a cockpit door is still a useful line of defense. It's difficult to verify the intentions or capabilities of everyone that will ever be a ...


4

In your picture, the door is currently open. It is most definitely there, but probably not re-enforced as commercial airline doors are. Very little physically prevents a passenger from entering the cockpit on a private charter. Generally, with private planes, security is done on the ground. The charter company does whatever diligence they feel is ...


4

A civil war yes, but it still had a government and this was supported by France. A flag carrier like Air France does not really have all that much leeway in terms of what they can do and it was probably in the nation's interest to show support to the legal government. Since they had asked, the answer was probably yes they had to fly(but no politician worth ...


4

Yes it's legal in some countries/locations. In the US after Sept-11 Operation Noble Eagle expanded the US Air Force's role to providing air defense for the entire US domestic airspace. Flying into a Special Flight Rules Area (or whatever they are calling it this week!) such as that over Washington DC and or into the even more restrictive Washington, D.C. ...


3

According to ICAO doc 4444 ATC will treat the hijacked aircraft with extra care - since the aircraft is considered to be in a state of emergency. Extra separation will be provided between the hijacked aircraft and other aircraft. 15.1.3.3 Whenever unlawful interference with an aircraft is known or suspected or a bomb threat warning has been received, ATS ...


3

COULD you do that? Sure. The relevant question, though, is if the tradeoffs involved would be worth it. How could you do that? Essentially, a trusted 3rd party could have the ability to disable all controls that the demented pilot has access to and assume all control over the aircraft. If you're willing for somebody in the network operations center to ...


2

While secured cockpit doors are not required on chartered or corporate aircraft, they do have a few security measures which are the same as those found on airliners to deter criminal activity or hijacking by passengers aboard the aircraft: Security screenings: Large aviation charter companies will subject travelers to TSA screenings, involving metal ...


2

Most escorts are actually unarmed. Fighters don't sit around in their home country with armaments on board. That could lead to incidents like this. Escorts are there primarily to provide eyes on the primary, attempt non-radio communication, and provide instant, reliable reports up the chain of command of anything that happens, such as course changes. ...


1

9/11 changed the entire paradigm related to hijackings. Before that any hijacking was assumed to be so and so wanting to force the plane to go somewhere, where they would get off, or collect a ransom or whatever. It introduced the idea of airliners being turned into cruise missiles by suicidal hijackers to take out institutional structures. The 9/11 ...


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