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13

This study on cabin noise with experiments in a Cessna 172s and a Piper PA-44 got the following results (noise comparisons are mine): Peak: Without headset: 101.3 dBA = rock concert (not front row though) With headset: ~88 dBA* = vacuum cleaner (old bag-style ones, not Dyson...) Average: Without headset: 86.26 dBA = heavy traffic (by the side of the road)...


11

Can you physically make it work? Yes. But you have to have an adaptor that fixes several compatibility issues. Headphone impedance Impedance is usually referred to in high and low range. Military headphones are low impedance, 19$\Omega$. Civil aviation uses 300$\Omega$, high impedance headphones. Impedance matching is not vital, but can cause some ...


11

I'm going to assume you're talking about something like this: Photo liberally stolen from here. As other have mentioned, these are generally connections for a standard aviation headset (headphone and microphone plugs). When plugged in you're typically connected to the cockpit (so the pilots know what's going on), and on commercial airlines you may also be ...


11

Some modern audio panels allow for independent volume control for pilot (left seat), co-pilot (right seat) and passengers. For example, a popular panel, the Garmin 340 has controls on each side of the panel, left for Pilot, right for Co-pilot: Another popular panel, the PS Engineering PMA-series only separates out the Crew from the Passengers. In that case,...


9

Apparently the tip connection is being grounded activating the PTT. From the photo the only thing that could possibly be a problem is the Compilot plug being a tiny bit longer than the DC. But the detent in the tip is what should decide where the plug sits in the jack and that looks fine. It almost has to be a wiring problem in the Compilot. If you have a ...


7

This is the expected behaviour. The other pilot might make some sound or even talk to someone else. You don't want any noise interfering with your own voice during transmission. Two microphones picking up your voice might also decrease the sound quality because of the small delay between the two locations.


6

To supplement Quentin's answer, the effects are accumulative and depend on the level of exposure. Most of the noise in a cockpit is low frequency sound of 75 to 100 hz with a 4 cyl engine/2 blade prop or 100 to 150 hz with a 6 cyl and 3 blade prop. Then there is the usual wide spectrum machinery noise and the white noise from the airflow. Long term ...


6

The rear seats of a Cessna 172 has headset jacks, I imagine the 182 has the same. You can see them in this picture: Image source You might also find them over the shoulder of rear passengers - as can be seen in this image (copyright attached) That links the rear-seat passengers to the same intercom you're used to from a front seat passenger.


6

Naively, it seems that this would pump more audio power into the ear. Granted, it will be in opposition to the original noise, but it seems it would be very tricky to get the cancellation exactly in phase. If the headphones succeed in reducing the noise you hear, then they will also have succeeded in reducing the power delivered to your eardrum (at the ...


5

To answer your questions: The headset allows the steward to talk on the aircraft's common channel which the pilot can connect to any radio frequency. Normally the steward will be talking both the captain and possibly to the tower of the arrival airport. The tower can patch in phone lines. So, if necessary, the tower can telephone a doctor, then patch in the ...


4

That‘s what is supposed to happen. The person in the right seat might be having a conversation with another passenger and you don’t want their conversation to be transmitted to ATC. Most audio panels also have a button that lets you isolate the pilot or crew from the rest of the passengers. I use that button all the time when on takeoff and landing so that ...


3

It depends on the airplane and what year was manufactured in. Generally though the answer is yes. Most modern general aviation airplanes include headset jacks at all passenger seats. Diamond aircraft have the plugs for all headset jacks on the aft section of the center console. Cessna has them on the wall liners of the airplane. Many modern airplanes ...


3

There's no issues with the adapter either way, as long as it's good quality. The helicopter versions are coiled for a good reason: to keep it out of your way, so I would buy the helicopter version. In most fixed wing airplanes the coil will be absolutely fine, if there's not enough reach you can get extenders pretty easily.


3

I just ran across this thread while investigating something similar, so my answer is almost 1 year old and will probably not be read. Anyway, one other very important factor is that Aviation headsets have noise cancellation in the MICROPHONE by using two openings on the mike, one in front to pick up the pilot's voice, and one on the back (or bottom) to pick ...


3

Yes, they are safe for your hearing. I've used them for about a decade, and the noise level is clearly lower with ANR than without. I've never seen any evidence that the energy they put out can damage one's hearing; by every account, rather, they do a good job protecting your hearing from the damaging effects of hours in a noisy environment.


3

I measured levels in the cockpit area of a twin Cessna where the propellers were inline with the pilot to the left and right and levels were 110dBA where I would be sitting. Levels were 100 in the back in the cabin. Without headsets, it would be impossible to communicate with crew/passengers and I'm sure hearing loss would result.


2

Yes you can use PC headsets if the right conversion plug is in place, and some work on the electronics is done. The frequency response of the average aviation headset is lower than that of an average headset that is used for listening to music, simce the aviation headset only has to reproduce the voice signals transmitted over the radio. A frequency range of ...


2

It's not a coincidence, the connection is a modular microphone standard called U-172/U. The pins it connects to are the U-173/U standard. You can't just get any microphone that has that connector though, it's not aviation specific. You need to get a microphone which has the right impedance and is designed to work with the voltage on an aircraft ...


2

Sure you can. Just make sure when you make some quirky write up about the audio system not working, you let the A&P know you were using said headsets. I once worked on a "chronic" audio system problem for days not realizing the same crew member had been writing it up. Out of dumb luck, one of the guys I was working with ran into him at a bar and he was ...


2

Yes you can, on your typical training cessna or piper the intercom and radio volumes are separately controlled. The radio will have its own volume knob and the intercom will have another, like this: If the radio is fine but the intercom is too loud then turn down the volume on the intercom, and vice versa. If they're both too loud turn down your headset's ...


2

I've had problems in the past with headphones feeling cramped on my ears, which I don't want to be the case with my headset Do your best to test them out before you buy. Some pilot shops will let you put them on your head and if you are nice to the people that lurk around the airport they may lend you one for a flight to try out. I find that the Zulu's ...


2

I actually know a guy that does this. He bought a nice noise canceling headset but then stopped flying and now he uses it on long flights and quite enjoys it. For what its worth noise canceling headphones have come down in price over the years and you may simply be able to sell the headset and buy a less bulky set of headphones for the money you make. But if ...


2

The answer to all of our questions is broadly yes, but to break it down: This company makes mic's for the Bose ANR audio headsets (quiet comfort line) that may fit your use case. You should be able to use a step up adapter to plug any standard aviation headset into 3.5 mm. It might be worth noting that many of the headsets out there now have bluetooth ...


2

Microphones used in aviation are usually electret condenser microphones that do not require any phantom power (obviously there are different types as well). While General Aviation Aircraft and many airliners use the dual PJ connectors (PJ-055 for headphones + PJ-068 for microphone), the Airbus and ATR aircraft (and probably some others) use XLR connectors. ...


2

So after Juan's help and also talking to Becker I think I've found the answer: It's an unlucky impedance combination. That means maybe I can get it to work by lowering the VOX-level (increase mic bias) far enough so my instructor can activate it but if I lower it too much, my own mic will constantly activate the intercom, resulting in constant noise. ...


2

If you're crew, you probably want to be wearing a headset for communication purposes. For passengers, these airplanes were flown for many decades before headsets became common (even for crew, using the handheld mic and overhead speaker) and long-time instructors had slight hearing loss, but for the random person taking a scenic flight to look at leaves or ...


2

The jack on every commercial airliner from Boeing and Airbus is a single plug U/174 type (aka helicopter). That holds true as long as we speak of the external jacks used for the flight interphone and service interphone. In the cockpit this is a different beast. You'll find a lot of variation: classic two-plug U/174 (aka helicopter, impedance must be ...


1

Here's a site comparing many of the headsets that are available https://www.sportys.com/pilotshop/aviation-headsets/guide.html I don't know if laptops support audio-out via bluetooth (I've not seen that, my HP Probook and my Lenovo W530 don't), so you might want to look at units which accept a wired Aux-in, and then plug in a wire from the laptop ...


1

While "comfort" may seem like a luxury, it's no fun to fly around with a headache. Give them a good try and look for minimal "squeezing" pressure. Also see other answers and comments re taking hearing protection seriously. Also if you routinely wear glasses (including sunglasses) be sure to test while wearing them-- they may break the earcup seal in a way ...


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