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1

Yes, you need to set the correct course yourself. There is no servo motor inside a mechanical HSI that can receive a command from an autopilot to change the course for you, it is designed to be manually set by the pilot. In my experience in GA with KAP140 autopilots, these are very basic non-integrated "add-ons" that need a lot of careful ...


7

It depends on your instrument suite. If you have just a radio with connected HSI, you have to set the course yourself, because on the radio you only set the frequency and there are hundreds ILS installations with the same frequency across the world. If you have flight management system with a waypoint database where you set the ILS by its identifier, it will ...


1

Modern airliners have Flight Management Computers that automatically calculate the crosswind component and then apply any necessary course corrections in any Lateral Navigation mode. Many can also display the current crosswind component. Here is an example of a B777 FMC that shows a right crosswind component of 28 knots in the upper right corner.


0

Airplanes with FMS systems normally display calculated wind direction and speed on the navigation display. It's simply based on the differences in heading vs track, and true airspeed vs groundspeed, worked out within the FMS computer. You can watch it in action in real time if you fly across a jetstream on a perpendicular track. You will see the heading ...


2

Yes, it is called a driftmeter and consists of a telescope aimed straight down at the ground. It has a set of scribed lines projected onto its field of view which the navigator can rotate so the scribes exactly follow the paths of objects on the ground. The navigator then reads off the resulting angle between the plane's axis of motion and the scribe lines. ...


5

There is not a specific instrument for this, because it is not directly measurable. Most modern aircraft have digital sensors for heading and airspeed, and their GPS/IRS will know ground track and ground speed. Any difference between those two vectors will be due to wind, and it’s a simple calculation to determine the wind vector’s direction and magnitude. ...


1

Not crosswind per-se but wind in general is calculated on-board by comparing aircraft internal data with GPS data. Your aircraft knows it's current heading and most computers can give you a pretty accurate educated guess on your True Air Speed. If you compare both of those with your Ground Speed and Track (this is, the actual lateral flight path of your ...


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