30

It won't be pleasant. The main result of being exposed outside at altitude, besides the obvious hypothermia, frostbite and hypoxia, will be bruising from the 280-ish knot slipstream (it's the indicated airspeed that matters as far was what you feel, not the true airspeed), and injuries from being flung around by any turbulent flow you are in. Most of your ...


21

This is from Irish Luck - Surviving Partial Ejection from A-6 Aircraft. In this incident, the bombardier/navigator's ejection seat came part way out of an A-6, leaving the head and upper body exposed. (The web page includes pictures of the incident, as well as the pilot's account of the event.) Some quotes from the bombardier/navigator's report: Before I ...


12

A skydiver in free fall is fully supported (i.e. no longer accelerating, but falling at constant velocity) at about the same speed as your example motorcycle. Wind resistance is generally proportional to the square of speed, other factors equal (same shape in the same orientation, mainly), so moving at three times the speed on the wing of an airliner would ...


6

Balloons travel with the wind, so all their motion over ground comes from air movements. do hot air balloons have the ability to control their ground speed? If so, how? This was a burning question in the nineteenth century and many attempts were made to influence ground speed, apart from rising into higher altitudes and testing whether the wind direction ...


3

A hot air balloon has no means of (horizontal) propulsion. As such, it will not move relative to the surrounding medium (the air). If the air moves relative to the ground (wind), the balloon will remain stationary relative to the air, and thus also move over the ground. In other words, if the wind is blowing at 10 knots, the balloon will have a ground speed ...


2

A LOT of wind 3-5 times the speed, means 9-25 times the drag, as subsonic drag scales roughly with square of speed. Multiply that by the relative density of air at your cruising altitude. For 30000ft, that is 37.5% So: You would feel 3.4 - 9.4 times the wind drag / air rush. You might also notice the difference in wind chill factor. The -45C air will feel ...


1

An ordinary hot-air balloon drifts with the wind and so its ground speed is always that of the wind. Some control over flight direction is possible by knowing or guessing the wind direction at different altitudes and climbing or descending to a level where the wind is favourable. A hot-air "dirigible balloon" or airship has an engine and propeller. ...


1

The only horizontal forces which act on hot air ballons are that of drag because of wind. In other words, balloons are pushed around only by wind. There is no other horizontal force (e.g. motor, or other means of propulsion) which act upon the balloon. This means that as soon as the balloon reaches the wind velocity, it will not feel any other horizontal ...


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