64

No, and this applies to any pilot, not just an airliner pilot. After the pilot has been cleared to land (or even if you're landing at your own discretion at an untowered airport), he can decide to go around instead of landing if he's dissatisfied with the approach for any reason. The pilot might need to abort the landing for reasons the tower can't possibly ...


49

Not likely. Pilots wear headphones, so we cannot hear the idle prattle of the pax in the hold. In any case, we don't take orders from passengers. Think about that for a second: would you like it if aircraft pilots followed the instructions of a crazy screaming passenger? What if there were TWO crazy screaming passengers giving contradictory commands? Which ...


42

None of four airlines I worked for (two commuters, two Part 121) had specific guidance as to the max number of go-arounds. However, as mentioned in the other answers, 2 or 3 was believed to be a good rule. The only time I did multiple go-arounds, all missed approaches, was trying to get into Pullman, WA during a snowstorm in the late 1980s in an SA-227 ...


40

The reason 1 pilot goes around may also be the reason the next pilot goes around, The second pilot would like to know before hand whether the runway is safe to land on. For example if it is wind related he can delay landing until it dies down. If it is debris related then the tower can dispatch a cleaning crew.


37

It depends. There are two general situations. One where the other aircraft was supposed to be on the runway and one where it was not. In order to increase traffic density and keep the system working, aircraft do not wait for the aircraft landing in front of them to clear the runway or, in single runway fields, for the aircraft taking off in front of them ...


35

The pilot of an aircraft is responsible for the safety of the flight. If he wants to go around or cancel takeoff, he can and will just do so. The purpose of ATC is to provide a service to help the pilots, not to tell them how to do their job. More technically speaking, when a flight is cleared for an approach, they are also automatically cleared to fly the ...


32

Pilots are not required to give a reason for a go-around, just to say that they are going around. A go-around is a busy time for the pilot(s) of the aircraft - power, flaps, trim, must be set, gear raised in some cases. The pilot needs to aviate first. The tower wants to know why the go-around was initiated by the pilot as it may be relevant for safety and/...


31

For the same reason that you don't takeoff with full flaps. Because the climb performance sucks. Flaps do add lift, but also a lot of drag. A low flap setting often provides more lift than drag, assisting climbout, whereas full flap offers a whole lot of drag, which is desirable when you want to be slow for landing. But a go-around necessitates gaining ...


27

No. A (pure) glider cannot make a go-around in the way a powered machine can. The glide path can be influenced by airbrakes, flaps, chutes or slipping, but mostly those are for reducing your L/D, i.e. steepening the approach (you win again, gravity!). Gaining height without updraft is only possible by converting kinetic energy (speed), and that gain is ...


20

No, a glider can't make a go around, but if they are going fast enough they can make a low pass (which looks like a go around), but that generally means that they won't be in a position to actually land even if they wanted to. The key to safely managing and landing a glider is energy management. When coming in to land it can't be too slow and low OR too ...


19

Is the heading to go around always well-known at every airport? The initial heading for a go around should always be well known based on a pilot's knowledge and understanding of the procedures associated with the type of approach being made. Generally, outlined below are the procedures used in U.S. airspace (unless modified by NOTAM, special notice, etc. ...


19

Approach, missed approach, departure & holding Approach, missed approach, departure and holding are published instrument procedures. They are characterised by waypoints, alitudes, headings, climb-, and descend profiles. An approach procedure tells you how to get from cruise to short final, from a holding to short final, or from cruise into a holding. A ...


18

Unless he’s shouting “cow on the runway”, I don’t even hear my copilot on finals as he mutters “too fast/slow”, “too high/low”, “left a bit”, etc., but I hear fine as we taxi and he says “Coffee’s on me”.


18

If a pilot decides to go-around for any reason, he can intiate a missed approach without making any radio call. There is a good reason for this. The decision will usually be made late in the approach, either because the decision height has been reached without visual contact, the approach has become unstable, or some other safety issue has arisen. All these ...


17

Looking at the Glossary for Pilots and Air Traffic Services Personnel (TP 11958E) at the Government of Canada web site, the definitions of overshoot and go-around are overshoot (1) To pass beyond the limit of the runway or landing field when trying to land. Fr: dépasser (2) Other expression for: go-around and “Go around” An ...


17

We can look at financial data from airlines to estimate these figures. In addition to fuel, there will also the extra duty time for the crew, some delay in schedule, and extra flight time on the aircraft. The delay in schedule can be difficult to estimate, but other costs of operation can be estimated. A short flight would take 1.5 hours, and the go around ...


17

No, but the passenger is likely to be arrested for causing such a disruption and face serious charges. The authorities don't react kindly to that kind of crap in a post 9/11 world.


16

Hi guys few days ago a twin otter did make an aborted landing and made a "go around" at the airport and headed back to Kathmandu. This is the first time such an incident happened although there has been numerous crashes in the past. Here is a link to the video.


16

No, it is almost impossible. The only runway (06/24) Lukla Airport is just 1500 feet long. This article lists some interesting facts: The topography of the place makes any go-around impossible. At the south, the runway is the end of an angled drop of about 2000 feet. This cliff is fenced off as a precautionary measure. At the northern end of the ...


15

The first thing I would point out is that LAX isn't going to be running simultaneous approaches on 24L and 24R or 25L and 25R. They'll select one of each of the parallel sets for the landing runways (typically the outer runways), and one of each for departing runways (typically the inner runways). For example, they might be landing on 25L and 24R and ...


14

The only term in the Pilot Controller Glossary is Go Around, so should technically be the only term used, at least when communicating with ATC: GO AROUND- Instructions for a pilot to abandon his/her approach to landing. Additional instructions may follow. Unless otherwise advised by ATC, a VFR aircraft or an aircraft conducting visual approach should ...


14

The only reason for a go-around is that the pilot or ATC thinks that landing is not safe or possible for this approach. When the pilot does that, they follow the 5 Ups memory aid (Power Up, Nose Up, Gear Up, Flaps Up, Speak Up). You can see that by the time a pilot is ready to inform ATC about go-around, he is already going around. Commonly, when ATC ...


14

When an aircraft has been given a clearance to land on a runway, that runway is exclusively reserved for the landing aircraft. (Except for LAHSO and "land after" operations, where only part of the runway is reserved for the landing aircraft). That means that no other aircraft or vehicle should be on that runway. In this case, clearly something went ...


14

A go-around is nothing to be worried about as a passenger. What would be worrying is if the pilots elected not to go around when conditions warranted it. The dark likely isn't an issue with this go around as approach lighting systems can become exceptionally bright when requested (to the point you'll need sunglasses to look at them if visibility is good)....


14

Yes. Every instrument approach procedure has a specified missed approach segment. The missed approach will be described in terms of route to fly (heading), altitude, speed and crossing restrictions, terrain clearance and any other required information. Before approaching an airport, the pilots will conduct a briefing that includes going through the missed ...


14

Immediately after touchdown, the autobrakes will start to function, and may start applying the brakes depending on the aircraft's deceleration and the commanded deceleration. If the pilot hasn't yet started to deploy the thrust reversers, a go-around is still possible at this point. Advancing the throttles will disengage the autobrakes, and it's a normal ...


12

A pilot does not need to get clearance for a go-around. Seconds can make the difference between safety and disaster, once a pilot recognizes a situation where a go-around is required they are expected to initiate the maneuver immediately. Once the pilot has established a positive rate of climb and followed the immediate go-around actions they will then ...


11

You correctly point out some of the challenges surrounding the procedure of retracting flaps upon go-around. Go arounds can be a stressful situation, flaps do give additional lift and margin against a stall, and retracting them does result in a pitch change for which the pilot must compensate. Allow me to address each of these concerns in turn. A go-around ...


10

Short answer: because first you're disrupting the traffic pattern (especially at larger airports that don't use a circular pattern and coordinate direct approaches instead) and the tower will want an explanation, and second because if there is a problem outside the cockpit causing you to execute the missed approach, other craft might have the same problem, ...


9

For go-around, several things have to be done in the moment the decision is taken: Apply full power (obviously), disconnect autopilot glide-slope mode, disarm spoilers and retract them if they are extended, disarm autobrakes and in some aircraft reduce flaps. Modern airliners, and some smaller aircraft, have a method for doing all of these at once via the ...


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