New answers tagged

0

GPS is never required in any aircraft. No navigational aid/equipment is required in aircraft flying VFR (Visual Flight Rules) or Daytime Special-VFR except for a magnetic compass. Nighttime Special-VFR and all IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) require navigational equipment specific for the flight undertaken and/or the Instrument Procedure flown. This may or may ...


0

A disoriented pilot may include pilots who are disoriented with respect to attitude. GPS does not provide attitude information, although it could be inferred to a degree. A Ground Proximity Warning System (GPWS) uses GPS data and digital elevation models (terrain) to predict terrain collisions. Such a device gives warning when an aircraft trajectory is ...


12

No, pilots are not required to use GPS maps or moving GPS while flying helicopters or fixed-wing aircraft. There are some approaches to landing that require GPS (called RNAV) approaches, but the airports that they serve usually have other types of non-precision approaches as well. Helicopters have specialized maps that are called Helicopter Route Charts ...


2

Sole means it is the only system, primary implies there is a secondary or even tertiary system, and supplemental means it supplements another system.


1

In reference to the OP’s original question about VOR and NDB procedures: Yes for a Missed Approach Segment or Hold. & NO for a Final Approach Segment WITH LATERAL GUIDANCE. The answer as it pertains to the final approach segment is NO if the Navaid is providing lateral guidance. And, you do not have to monitor the underlying Navaid EXCEPT for ...


Top 50 recent answers are included