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3

It is simply because in the Z142 the fuel pump is delivering more fuel to the engine than the required and this excessive fuel is transferred back always to the right tank. If during taxi/take off it is full and you would use the left one or both tanks, there would be a possibility to leak this excessive fuel out from the aircraft via the right overflow ...


2

AFAIK, every low-wing plane requires the boost pump to be on during takeoff, climb, descent and landing. This is a safety measure. When you are flying low and slow, the consequences of the engine-driven fuel pump failing can be dire, so the added safety is worth a bit of extra wear on the boost pump. During taxi, you want the boost pump off so you can detect ...


0

The most likely reason is, that during climb, the engine will, of course be running on high revs, and so will the engine's mechanical pump. It will most likely also be operating at better efficiency. For the fuel system & engine combination in question, the engines own fuel pump is not able to ensure sufficient fuel flow (unwanted lean condition) or ...


6

Wobble pumps are manually operated boost pumps and are normally upstream of the engine driven pump, often used to help prime it by pre-pressurizing the engine pump inlet before starting. The DeHavilland Beaver had a wobble boost pump as the sole backup pump, which you would use to build fuel pressure before starting, and if the engine pump quit, you could ...


5

Regarding small aircraft, I had an experience this morning that shows why a pressure gauge is useful. On the right tank, I was in the center of the green arc without the boost pump. On the left tank, though, it was at the low end of the green arc. Technically still okay, but I felt safer leaving the boost pump on when using that tank. More importantly, I ...


11

If your fuel system has pumps, a pressure gauge is important because it provides a precise status of the pump and can provide early warning of future problems, like pressure fluctuations, or declining but still acceptable pressure. A warning light is there to get the pilot's attention when things really go south. In an ideal world, you'd want both, but of ...


21

Much depends on your specific aircraft. Some have a need for fuel pressure values, others don't. Likewise fuel temperature readings. On the 737, there is a light as you describe next to each fuel pump switch, linked to a sensor just downstream of the corresponding fuel pump. If the light's on, the pressure is low and the pump should be turned off because ...


2

I don't know anything specific about the V-280, but I know about conventional airplanes. Everything from the Cessna 172 to bizjets (like Gulfstreams) up to Boeing and Airbus airliners all use integral wing fuel tanks. The structural wing box actually is the fuel tank. All of the open areas inside the hollow wing box structure become the fuel tank. When the ...


1

Usually in modern aircraft the different system's parts are manufactured by subcontractors. There are industries like Safran (see for example the Safran aerosystem part) or aloft that are taking care of designing these parts and propose them on the market. In general airplane makers industries are assemblers, they design the frame, they define the specifics ...


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