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17

Earth's magnetic field is not symmetric north to south. In particular, the magnetic declination can get significantly larger at a given southern latitude than it does at the corresponding northern latitude. This can be seen by looking at a world declination map: Curves of a given declination reach much lower southern latitudes than they do northern ...


6

CI = course to intercept CF = course to fix FI = fix to intercept CD = course to DME FD = fix to DME These are AIRINC 424 leg types. You can find more information on them here


4

It looks like the "weather product age" for NEXRAD weather data, i.e. how old the current data you're seeing is (see Pilot's Guide, p.13). The number is contextual, based on the weather information type: The age of the displayed weather product—or the effective time of Winds Aloft predictions—is shown in the upper right corner of the display. For ...


3

I think you have it backwards, it is not that a slower airspeed produces a steeper climb, it it that a steeper climb, given the same power, will cause a slower airspeed. If the only constraint you're setting the FMS is the airspeed to maintain for a constant thrust, then it will pitch up more, increasing the rate of climb, which will slow the airspeed.


3

Navigation databases are typically targeted at FMS based systems, usually using the ARINC-424 standard. These are ASCII database files that describe aspects such as approach procedures, flight plans, spacing, etc. It would also provide basic runway information such as heading and altitude of touchdown points - enough to navigate but not enough to paint a ...


3

The reason is that the tropopause is at 11 km (36 089 ft) in the International Standard Atmosphere. At the tropopause, the temperature lapse rate of the atmosphere (how temperature changes with altitude) has an abrupt change: the ISA value is -6.5°C / km (-1.98°C / 1000 ft) below and then suddenly changes to 0°C / km (meaning temperature suddenly stays ...


2

Initially, pitching up will trade airspeed for altitude. Going from a climb at 300 knots to a climb at 250 knots means pulling back & increasing the rate of climb while the speed decreases. For a close-in fix to the climb profile, this is often sufficient to rapidly gain several hundred feet above the FMC prediction and solve the situation. For a steady ...


1

If the 737 is like most other FMS installations you will find the approach will activate at the capture fix. It is typically the waypoint just before the FAF. If you were flying into KMEM RNAV RWY 36C the capture fix would be NESBT and the FAF would be GINIE. In the FMS that I use, the capture fix is typically loaded twice into the flightplan. Once from ...


1

As you said, it will vary by airline. Mine has a few screens, and the pilots enter in number adults and children in each seating zone, number of total infants, number of standard and heavy items in cargo, any additional weight in cargo (shipping cargo, mail, ballast, etc). Also the desired runways to get data for and their condition (dry, wet, snow, etc). ...


1

These are RNAV procedures as defined in ARINC 424 used for database coding. They define paths which an aircraft must follow during RNAV departures and approaches. Every standard departure and approach can be divided into distinct sections. Each possible path starts at a point and ends at a termination point. The file format is standardized so that each and ...


1

The approach speed that is shown on the MCDU performance page is based on the pilot entered wind or in Airbus terms, tower head wind component. The headwind component is the one which affects the aircraft energy on the approach. The approach speed also known as Vapp is calculated as follows: Vls (lowest selectable speed or Vref in landing config) + 5 knots (...


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