New answers tagged

2

Theoretically, if the Neutral Point was still aft of the C of G with the tail gone, you could still be statically stable to some degree, but without the trimming surfaces of the elevator/stab providing the pitching force-balance system to control AOA, you become statically stable about the wing's zero-pitching-moment AOA somewhere, and you are more or less a ...


2

No - though the vertical stabilizer might be worked around, the same is not true for the horizonal stablizer. Without it you will loose stability in the pitch axis so much that I doubt there will be any chance for a controlled flight on nearly all aircaft (though there is a possibility that a few ones might remain some kind of controllability)


2

The side stick controller uses two sets of quad-redundant, linear variable-displacement transducers to measure stick position against a linear spring force. One set is for pitch and the other is for roll. The electrical signals from the LVDTs go to a computer. Control law software interprets the inputs and controls the hydraulic actuators that move the ...


10

Technically, F-16 and "similar fighters" have leading edge flaps (LEF) (or droop flaps), rather than slats. The difference is that they don't form a gap between themselves and the main surface when deflected. This makes them usable at high speeds, whereas slats are typically used for low-speed takeoff/landing. For fighters, the most important use ...


8

According to a F16 forum.. Those are the LEF's (leading edge flaps). They are there to produce extra lift to the wings during high AOA and low airspeeds. The reason they are up on the ground is they are wired to the left and right main WOW (weight on wheels) switches. They are schedule to -2 degrees on the ground. The only time they move on the ground is ...


Top 50 recent answers are included