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3

This is an indirect answer at best, but I think you'll get something good out of it. I would definitely recommend you have look at CuriousMarc's series on YouTube where he and a couple other SMEs restore an original Apollo Guidance Computer to working order. You might think "that's not civil aviation, why?", but the AGC was the first digital fly-by-wire ...


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Brief answer: Yes, but the protection does not always work. Most modern fighter aircraft have an AoA limiter. That is different from a stall warning – in case of the McDonnell Douglas F-4 the limit was only 23 degree, below the stall limit. The reason for the limit was the loss of directional stability above 23 degree AoA. In case of the JAS-39 Gripen the ...


0

Every fly-by-wire type has protective measures to keep it within the designated flight envelope. In the case of agile fighters capable of the Cobra and suchlike, they are designed to maintain predictable airflow at extreme angles of attack, long after the conventional flow over the wing has broken away. Typically this will involve vortex lift at intermediate ...


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