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It appears that you are assuming that there is a human pilot (or autopilot) in the loop, making pitch inputs as needed to prevent the aircraft from accelerating up or down as the bank angle is changed. (You could also model what the aircraft tended to do on its own if the aircraft entered a bank but the elevator position remained constant. This would be a ...


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It's an axes definition issue, it is important to realise that altitude and weight are earth axis variables. Centripetal force is provided by lift, not by gravity. Downward gravity force does not reduce when the aeroplane takes on a different attitude, it always pulls downward to earth with magnitude $m*g$. in the statement "..angle of attack should be ...


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It seems you forgot to add centrifugal acceleration. Lift must increase to produce the centripetal force that is needed for turning. I suggest you start with the desired turn rate and determine the amount of sideways lift from there. This in relation to the amount of lift for compensating gravitational weight will give you the bank angle. Now it is helpful ...


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I have been attempting to find information on this question for quite a while, and judging by the lack of answers, I am assuming that Zeus, in the comments to the question, is right: that accidents involving a flight simulator, to the extent that they are severe or sensational, are very rare. More often, accidents would be considered “workplace incidents” ...


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Lifespan of a Level D simulator is: as long as the maintenance costs are justified. Image source Maintenance costs of a simulator is according a typical bathtub curve, with the right side of the curve forever climbing up and up. Like with operating and maintaining an old-timer car, as long as spare parts can be purchased it is only a matter of justifying the ...


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As long as it's maintained, and replacement parts are available, there is no limit. Although maintenance could end up costing more than the simulator itself: CAE says the Series 5000 will offer a 25% reduction in lifecycle costs, which tend to be two to three times the original cost of the simulator during a 20-year lifetime (...) — flightglobal.com, 2008 ...


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In my part 91 (VFR, general aviation) training my CFI was more than happy to let me crash in the sim. Others have spoken about sims that took time to reboot/reset, but in the case of the single-engine simulators I used it's all managed via tablet more or less instantly. I definitely "tested the terrain system" in the sim a few times without it ...


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In the rare cases in the Shuttle Mission Simulator when a training session entered a loss-of-control or other irremediable situation, it was standard practice to freeze the sim rather than run the case to the point that it auto-froze due to ground contact or excessive acceleration. Once it was clear that the situation was irrecoverable, it was a waste of ...


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I would say that crashes happen fairly frequently on initial type courses where new pilots are moving up to jets, and mainly on what are called "V1 cuts", where an engine is failed right at rotation or just after. Many are not ready for the hard roll you get with a swept wing airplane when it yaws hard and you are slow to counteract it with rudder. ...


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In my experience, often the pilot taking the training is in the process of attempting to manage the aircraft during a maneuver (e.g., engine-out go around, rejected takeoff, etc.) and the loss of control/crash takes place so quickly that the sim instructor does not have time to freeze the simulator beforehand. If it is obvious that a crash is imminent and ...


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