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The short answer is: because the room containing the simulator has a ceiling, floor, and walls, through which it is desired that the simulator not travel. Since the integral of acceleration is non-zero, acceleration implies velocity which implies distance travelled. For rooms of a reasonable size, this implies that only very limited accelerations may be ...


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The ACME Worldwide Enterprises motion cueing simulator seat CAN produce a G-force affect. They can be used with military or commercial simulators and utilize technologies placed inside a replica seat's back pan, seat pan, shoulder and lap belt harnesses to simulate g-onset and up to 1.8G sustained g-cues. The signal to the seat comes from the aircraft flight ...


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Are you sure you're calculating all these forces in the correct axis? Weight is always straight down toward the Earth, but the other three forces rotate with the plane as shown in your diagram. If the nose of the plane is pointed straight down, then the force of thrust points directly down and thus is added to gravity. Drag will point straight up, and lift ...


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Congratulations, you have just discovered... Vbg! First, remember vertical lift opposes weight, and this will be the $cosine$ of your lift vector (which is correctly drawn). As your speed increases, your plane will depart from its line of flight (which is descending). With a glider, the wing is now not only supporting weight, it also has a horizontal ...


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Watch the pitch equilibrium better. Normally, when an airplane picks up speed in a dive, the lift coefficient drops. This will shift the balance of moments (lift and weight times their moment arms) such that the aircraft returns to its old speed (after several oscillations). Unless you show us the full mathematical model, it is hard to say where you went ...


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@James Turner: considering the date of the question, you've surely moved on. If you found a solution elsewhere, you can post it here and get some bonus points for answering your own question. Anyhow, the Aviation Formulary has the answer to your question: it's not Clairaut's Formula. You can find the latitude of ownship position by entering its longitude and ...


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