New answers tagged

1

If a pilot is doing a License Proficiency Check (LPC), i.e. an annual check of the skills required of a Type Rating (e.g. B757, A330, etc) as endorsed within that pilot's license, which is being conducted by a Type Rated Examiner (TRE) on behalf of the National Aviation Authority (NAA) and that pilot fails the LPC, the TRE is legally required to inform the ...


20

Crashes, or at least wing tip strikes, are not uncommon on an initial jet type course during engine failure training on take off, on what are called "V1 cuts" (engine failure just before or after rotation speed) especially with pilots who are new to swept wing airplanes (if you are slow with the compensating rudder, the plane rolls very hard once ...


30

Crashing a Level D Full Flight Simulator during a training session is not good. They exist for: Initial training, of licensed pilots who have not flown the type before and need to become familiar with the controls, systems, handling characteristics and procedures of the particular aeroplane. Usually a series of about thirteen 4-hour sessions. Recurring ...


3

It really doesn't matter. It doesn't matter as there is no such thing as "standard buttons" on a side stick or control column. Take for example the A320 that has a priority take over button which sounds kind of useless to your scenario. Another example is the control column of 737(-800) that has 2 switches used for electrical trim. Such a switch ...


4

As mentioned, real life side sticks are very simplistic compared to gaming devices. There is basically an autopilot disconnect push button and radio tangent (aka push-to-talk) switch. On aircraft that require manual trimming there is also the elevator trim switch. But there is also another aspect in cockpit design that can be adapted to gaming. Critical ...


0

Aircraft rarely have more than two or three buttons on their yokes. Joysticks like the one pictured are intended more for fighter-type games, where you have to quickly fire the gun, select missiles, designate a target, etc., all while maneuvering the plane. Civilian aviation just isn't that fast-paced, so there isn't any point to covering the yoke in buttons....


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