25

My experience with the military is that loudspeaker announcements like this do NOT occur in simulator buildings. They would be both distracting and largely unnecessary when there are land lines and published schedules available. Besides the simulators themselves there are briefing and debriefing rooms where crews and instructors are discussing conduct of ...


23

Full Motion is full in the sense that it can generate cues in all 6 Degrees Of Freedom: fwd/aft, left/right, up/down, pitch, roll, yaw. The term came in use to distinguish between 6-DOF systems and the earlier 3-DOF systems which only produced pitch, roll, heave cues. Do they just simulate the major motions of the airplane in response to the flight ...


23

My answer applies to the 141 training programs I've been a part of; Michael Hall's answer is correct - there are no loudspeaker announcements made, with one rare but important exception: "FIRE ALARM IN SIMULATOR BAY. EVACUATE. EVACUATE." Of course, since almost any commercial-use building has fire alarms and fire drills, this isn't especially interesting ...


21

It is not common to call out the height above ground level when landing in a small aircraft. The main reason for this is that there simply is no way to measure it: A radio altimeter, which could directly measure the height, is not typically installed on a small aircraft. A pressure altimeter is not accurate enough. With the correct QNH reference pressure ...


10

The feel and graphics in a Level D FFS are pretty darn realistic. Even the feel of vibrations of the engine and the motion during taxiing is pretty well approximated. The entire gimbaled capsule shakes, vibrates and moves on electric jacks. One unit will seat 6-8 people. And, you had better use seatbelts. One unit will take up a room the size of a business ...


9

Is this common in real life flying? Are actual pilots consistently able to align the nose wheel to the runway centreline during takeoff in such single engine propeller plane or am I being too idealistic? In my experience flying primarily light singles its not terribly difficult to stay aligned on the centerline during takeoff. Even my first solo was ...


8

The most advanced open source flight simulator is currently FlightGear. It doesn't fall too far short of its commercial brethren. The repository is hosted on SourceForge, where you can download the entire codebase. For documentation and discussion on how it works, see the forum and the mailing lists. Once you have questions regarding the codebase per se, ...


7

The Shuttle Mission Simulator's (SMS) Motion Base simulator sat on a standard hexapod motion base so it had the usual three translational / three rotational axes. Unusually though it had an additional degree of freedom: the cabin could tilt upwards almost 90 degrees to simulate launches. It used an additional hydraulic actuator (highlighted) for this. This ...


7

he argues that we still need to do it to remember to reduce throttle and flare. Is he right? Would this be acceptable in a real lesson? If you (for any value of "you") need a reminder for that, then you shouldn't be flying. Seriously. I suppose an instructor could accept needing to call it out or even do it themselves (while the student is following along) ...


6

Does this clearance allow me to fly a reciprocal of 020 inbound to the station? Or will I just have to fly away from the station on 020 radial? A radial is always pointing away (radiating) from the VOR. The clearance therefore instructs you to fly away from the VOR on the 020 radial. Will a left turn be more appropriate than a right turn to intercept ...


6

What they can do. Motion systems can produce accelerations that stimulate the acceleration sensors in our inner ear. Higher frequency acceleration can be sensed instantaneously in surge, sway and heave. From this answer: Motion systems can do a pretty good job at reproducing direct accelerations, until the actuator stroke runs out of course. So for short ...


5

A "6 degrees of freedom" motion base still has to cheat, to emulate real-world motion. For example, it can't do several consecutive rotations about one axis, like an aerobatic airplane flying rolls. I haven't heard of one that can even do a half roll (or half loop) into steady inverted flight. Translational motion also has its limits. To simulate ...


5

They can produce sustained G-forces, by tilting the sim without the occupants noticing. Of course, this tilting of the 1G gravity vector is limited to practical angles of about 45°, producing 0.7G of simulated sustained horizontal acceleration. Vertical sustained acceleration is a different matter altogether: the 1G is always already there and can only be ...


5

It's not restricted - the sim will continue to move through any maneuvers - but realism degrades the further away they get from zero. Full-motion simulators don't map motion 1:1, but rather trick the senses. Maneuvers are performed with velocity and acceleration. What the human body senses is acceleration. And what the brain processes most actively is jerk -...


4

You are asking: "Should I keep flying with something that annoys me and puts me off"? Answer: No I am guessing that you are aiming for realism: In reality, if this annoying something were part of the C172 checklist, then you should not fly the airplane again until you had found a way to overcome your annoyance. If it weren't part of the standard then it ...


4

The only G forces the simulator can simulate are sustained lateral forces, which you feel when it tilts, and very limited short vertical and lateral accelerations. A tilt aft feels like acceleration/climbing, a tilt forward feels like deceleration/descending, and tilts to the side feel like you are skidding. The only vertical accelerations the sim can ...


4

If I remember correctly most of those FSX lessons were done by Rod Machado. He’s a good CFI but has a tendency to speak tongue-in-cheek about things. What he means by that is that by lowering the nose you can maintain the same airspeed but use less power to do it i.e. getting a free ride out of it. In truth what’s happening is that the airplane is ...


3

Left-right, up-down, roll, yaw, and accelerate/decelerate. Faking engine vibration, and more violent yawing from engine failure is pretty standard capability.


3

Yes there are PC joysticks that can remain in an off center position: the active feedback joysticks, without the force feedback switched on. The stick feels pretty light in that situation and kind of remains where you put it, almost like a helicopter cyclic stick with the trim button released. When switched on, the force feedback can act like a passive ...


3

There are four types of aviation training devices: Basic Aviation Training Devices, Advanced Aviation Training Devices and Flight Simulators that are regulated under §61.4 and full flight simulators (FFS) and flight training devices (FTD) that are regulated under 14 CFR part 60 The BATD and AATD often use the same software that you can use on your home ...


3

The main difference is in the flight dynamics model. A PC simulator can be realistic, but who is to say that it is? A professional simulator must show to the authorities (EASA,FAA etc) that the modelled behaviour matches flight data. There are several authorisation levels, from very basic to zero-flight-time. Even for the basic devices, the authorities want ...


2

Both sims allow you to do a review of your flight where you can see both plan views and vertical profiles of the flight to analyze the results. This can be especially useful when analyzing the results of attitude instrument flying like A and B patterns, etc. CloudAhoy does allow integration of flights from X-Plane for review as well. ATC is a bit better ...


2

Typically in numerical simulations, instead of an ideal(inviscid) vortex, a viscous vortex with a finite core is used to avoid the singularity at the centre. In these viscous vortices, the swirl velocity inside the core is assumed to be linearly increasing from zero at the centre. While outside the core, the induced velocity remains the same as that of the ...


2

As far as I can tell, there are two general approaches: Solid body dynamic simulation with lots of experimental coefficients. Most of the aerodynamic effects are simply summed for the whole aircraft, though the more advanced simulators need to calculate the wheel position and wing and fuselage flexing to get proper reactions mainly at landing. But it is ...


2

I guess it depends whether or not you feel this information is at all helpful. The best thing for both of you would be to take a lesson in a Cessna 172. It is extremely important that ubiquitous knowledge of flight can get you in a lot of trouble if you are not familiar with the type of aircraft you are flying. Specifically and to the point, a light GA ...


2

In actual practice you will find it easier to quickly perceive any deviation (drifting) toward the left or right edge of the runway if you positon the aircraft so that the runway centerline goes right under your seat. So that you are essentially "sitting on" the centerline. This makes the runway centerline appear to project perfectly forward in your vision,...


2

14 CFR Part 60 regulates what constitutes a Flight Simulator Training Device (FSTD) for a particular aircraft model. FSTD is divided into two broad categories: Full Flight Simulators (FFS) and Flight Training Devices (FTD). A big difference between the two categories is FFS requires having motion cues, whereas motion cue is optional on FTD. Furthermore, the ...


2

I think it's more of a question about the simulator software than the joystick. For example Flight Simulator 2004 did have force feedback modeled into it, but I don't recall it being very sophisticated. I do not know the current status of "consumer grade" sim software, but I'm highly doubtful that they would be able to mimick actual feel of stick forces in a ...


1

Such effects can only be produced by so called 'force feedback' (FFB) devices. They exist, but few of them, if any (in the consumer market) produce satisfactory results. Good force feedback simply cannot be done cheaply, and this restricts the market to niche enthusiasts and professionals. It is relatively easy to produce 'effects' such as vibration and ...


1

It is very rare to take off in perfectly calm conditions (wind can add or subtract from "left turning forces"). Rudder inputs are added on a "as needed" basis by the pilot, usually in small increments. Taking an hour at a local airport in a 172 may be your best answer. Keep in mind, with side by side seating, your eyes are slightly off the centerline when ...


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