23

Full Motion is full in the sense that it can generate cues in all 6 Degrees Of Freedom: fwd/aft, left/right, up/down, pitch, roll, yaw. The term came in use to distinguish between 6-DOF systems and the earlier 3-DOF systems which only produced pitch, roll, heave cues. Do they just simulate the major motions of the airplane in response to the flight ...


10

The feel and graphics in a Level D FFS are pretty darn realistic. Even the feel of vibrations of the engine and the motion during taxiing is pretty well approximated. The entire gimbaled capsule shakes, vibrates and moves on electric jacks. One unit will seat 6-8 people. And, you had better use seatbelts. One unit will take up a room the size of a business ...


7

The Shuttle Mission Simulator's (SMS) Motion Base simulator sat on a standard hexapod motion base so it had the usual three translational / three rotational axes. Unusually though it had an additional degree of freedom: the cabin could tilt upwards almost 90 degrees to simulate launches. It used an additional hydraulic actuator (highlighted) for this. This ...


5

A "6 degrees of freedom" motion base still has to cheat, to emulate real-world motion. For example, it can't do several consecutive rotations about one axis, like an aerobatic airplane flying rolls. I haven't heard of one that can even do a half roll (or half loop) into steady inverted flight. Translational motion also has its limits. To simulate ...


5

They can produce sustained G-forces, by tilting the sim without the occupants noticing. Of course, this tilting of the 1G gravity vector is limited to practical angles of about 45°, producing 0.7G of simulated sustained horizontal acceleration. Vertical sustained acceleration is a different matter altogether: the 1G is always already there and can only be ...


4

The only G forces the simulator can simulate are sustained lateral forces, which you feel when it tilts, and very limited short vertical and lateral accelerations. A tilt aft feels like acceleration/climbing, a tilt forward feels like deceleration/descending, and tilts to the side feel like you are skidding. The only vertical accelerations the sim can ...


3

Left-right, up-down, roll, yaw, and accelerate/decelerate. Faking engine vibration, and more violent yawing from engine failure is pretty standard capability.


3

Yes there are PC joysticks that can remain in an off center position: the active feedback joysticks, without the force feedback switched on. The stick feels pretty light in that situation and kind of remains where you put it, almost like a helicopter cyclic stick with the trim button released. When switched on, the force feedback can act like a passive ...


2

I think it's more of a question about the simulator software than the joystick. For example Flight Simulator 2004 did have force feedback modeled into it, but I don't recall it being very sophisticated. I do not know the current status of "consumer grade" sim software, but I'm highly doubtful that they would be able to mimick actual feel of stick forces in a ...


1

Such effects can only be produced by so called 'force feedback' (FFB) devices. They exist, but few of them, if any (in the consumer market) produce satisfactory results. Good force feedback simply cannot be done cheaply, and this restricts the market to niche enthusiasts and professionals. It is relatively easy to produce 'effects' such as vibration and ...


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