New answers tagged

2

@George already gave a correct answer, but I'll expand it a bit and show the source. Indeed, the lower load limit is for trans- and supersonic flight (formally M > 0.85) and the higher limit is for subsonic conditions. The AoA redline at 15° also relates to M > 0.85. At subsonic speeds, the max AoA is 26°. I can only speculate why it is not shown on the ...


3

From this copy of the flight manual for the 737: Glide Slope Pointer and Deviation Scale ... At low radio altitudes, with autopilot engaged, the scale turns amber and the pointer flashes to indicate excessive glide slope deviation. Each pilot’s deviation alerting system self-tests upon becoming armed at 1500 feet radio altitude. This ...


2

The line that is at the 9 G's is limit of maximum amount of G's( 9) until 0.85Mach (that is subsonic speed) and the lower line@7.5 is the limit for supersonic flight.


2

That display is part of the AFS (Auto Flight System) Control Panel on the FCU (Flight Control Unit): (Airbus A340 FCOM - Auto Flight - General) The general idea of the FCU is that you can push in the knobs, which will put the respective autoflight mode in an automatic setting (called managed mode) and show dashes in the display, and you can pull the knobs ...


0

I can’t comment on the MiG exactly, but most fighter aircraft have maneuvering limitations when heavily loaded with external stores. If I recall correctly, the F-16 is limited to ~7Gs with a loadout. A good guess is that the MiG has similar limitations; this would be verified by looking at a MiG-29 flight manual under operational limitations listed therein....


10

This is a differential pressure and cabin altitude indicator. The outer dial indicates the difference in pressure between the inside of the cabin and the outside in psi. During takeoff and landing, it must not be larger than 0.125 psi, as the note below the instrument says. If it exceeds 9.1 psi, the pressure relief valve will release the pressure to ...


2

As per this article, it's a Cabin & Differential pressure gauge (Boeing). Here's an explanation: The differential pressure gauge shows the difference between the pressure inside the aircraft and the pressure outside. So you would expect that diff pressure would be zero when you are on the ground and the passengers are boarding. When you are climbing, ...


5

In short, it is the vacuum gauge. It measures the vacuum pressure in Inches of Mercury. It runs/powers your non-electrical gyroscopic instruments. Those are your Attitude Indicator, your Directional Gyroscope, and sometimes your Turn Coordinator. These are all necessary to fly by Instrument Flight Rules. Read these: PHAK Airplane Flying Handbook


5

This does exist, and is used by US military aircraft. It's called a Self-contained Approach (SCA) or Independent Precision Radar Approach (IPRA). The primary user of these approaches is Air Force Special Operations Command on aircraft like the MC-130 and AC-130. Regulatory guidance is contained in the AFI 11-202v3 AFSOC Sup, section 7.4, and operational ...


Top 50 recent answers are included