New answers tagged

55

My experience is circa 1990s, but I can offer some perspective on US fixed wing operations. Besides TACAN and ASR for non-precision approaches, there are (were) 3 precision instrument approach options available: Precision Approach Radar (PAR), Instrument Landing System (ILS, or “Bullseye”) Automatic Carrier Landing System (ACLS). PAR: This consists of both ...


14

Although I can’t detail fixed wing operations at sea, many countries operating helicopters use an ELVA procedure, an Emergency Low Visibility Approach. Most vessels operating aircraft will have a radar to provide a SCA (ship controlled approach) or if the helicopter has a radar it will be able to fly its own HCA (helicopter controlled approach). Assuming the ...


14

Level flight just means not climbing or descending. Where the nose is actually pointing is another matter. The pitch you are seeing is the "deck angle". Pitch attitude is normally referenced to the longitudinal axis of the fuselage (and normally, the cabin floor or deck) relative to the horizon for the loading and speed you are at. The deck angle ...


3

I was always told that an analog AI should be set to the white horizon line while on level ground, rather than for straight and level flight. The reason for this is that it offers a truer picture of the pitch of the nose above the imaginary horizontal plane. For example, a Cessna 172 in straight and level flight will actually be in an orientation with the ...


3

In level flight, it's natural to have some nose-up pitch. You need some angle of attack to produce lift that counteracts gravity. "Level" on the attitude indicator probably refers to 0 angle of attack, or how the plane sits when it's on the ground wheels down and the G1000 is being calibrated.


5

At FL430 cruise, your aircraft is probably exhibiting a real nose-up pitch attitude in order to achieve the wing's best-economy AoA at that point in the flight envelope and the electronic detectors in the pitch attitude indication system are showing you this. Taking a vacuum-driven "steam gauge" gyro apart reveals a set of clever doodads called ...


6

Instrument parallax has to do with viewing position of the pilot compared to the instrument. You adjust the symbolic airplane to the horizon bar on the outside of the instrument, not the part that moves, so you don't have to wait for it to spin up or find flat ground. I do it as part of my pre-start instrument checks, after adjusting my seat. All mechanical ...


Top 50 recent answers are included