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29

That attitude gyro reacts in the opposite manner to pitch movement (pitch down = horizon line rolls DOWN) compared to the "conventional" manner (pitch down, horizon line rolls UP). This is sufficiently confusing that on similar gyros of American manufacture, the words CLIMB and DIVE are printed on the "ball" inside the gyro case to remind the pilot what the ...


22

This is interesting! The only lead I was able to find (so far) is this discussion thread, with a comment: The colour becomes logical, if you see it moving. Climbing the plane which shows the sky in blue on the artificial horizon. Ground being brown/earth, if you see this, the nose of the plane is pointing downwards And the explanation for arranging ...


0

It’s airworthy if the gauge reaches here are not required for the operations in question per 91.205 and the procedure outlined in 91.213 is used to label the gauges inoperative AND this problem is addressed and repaired during the next maintenance session.


0

All the answer except for quiet flyer's are spot on. Although, I do appreciate, acknowledge and understand his point of view. 90 years of instrument flight has dictated which instrument is primary and which is secondary for each state of flight. It is not arbitrary. The way to look at it is that you are trying to achieve a certain outcome without the benefit ...


1

The 172S has both a Comprehensive Equipment List and a Kinds of Operation List in the POH. Check them both to see if you can operate the aircraft without an EGT. My guess would be yes, since practically, it does not NEED it. You can lean the engine using the Tach and your ear. And, 91.205 does not require an EGT nor a CHT.


7

Part 91 does not require an EGT probe for any operations so the next thing to look at is your AFM. Your C172S has an AFM that includes a Comprehensive Equipment List. It is probably similar to this one that indicates that the EGT probe is standard equipment—not required for certification, this airplane can fly with it placarded.


0

The answers already provided are very good, this answer is meant to say the same thing in different terms, not to contradict what has already been written. A primary instrument is one that provides a value for you to hold. If you want to maintain 5,000 feet, then the altimeter is the primary instrument because though there are other instruments that can ...


1

The whole point of classifying primary or secondary instrument (or the other method control-performance) is to teach pilots to look at what is important during different phases of flight. When you read the Instrument Flying Handbook, it will tell you what instruments are primary and what instruments are secondary. For example, in straight and level ...


-1

"Why can't we use just one as a primary instrument?" -- sometimes we can. I've seen video of a Cessna 120 being flown in cloud with all gyro instruments covered up. The pilot's hands were not touching the control stick or throttle. The airspeed, tachometer, altimeter, and vertical speed indicator (if present) were not covered up, but they might as well ...


1

Because during certain maneuvers, certain instruments provide more relevant information to a pilot than do others. In straight and level flight, the heading indicator provides more relevant bank information as it tells you whether your current bank attitude is maintaining the desired heading. The altimeter is providing the most relevant pitch information ...


5

Yes the DG is supposed to be set to the corrected magnetic indication whenever you set it, so you should mentally add or subtract the degree or two or three based on the closest segment on the card as a standard practice. I agree with Michael however that it's not really that big a deal for VFR flying in the real world, especially in the age of GPS where ...


0

Personally I never bother, but then when I fly an airplane with a Directional Gyro that needs adjustment I am always VFR, and generally know right where I am going so I am not relying on a super accurate compass. (I know the Puget Sound area where I typically fly very well, and there are lots of excellent visual reference points) Also, plus or minus a few ...


6

It depends. On my Cherokee, when you turn the navigation lights on you can push the switch up or down. Up gives you bright lights on the panel and down gives you dim lights. There is also an overhead red light that has a sliding door that you can open or close for more or less light. There is one rheostat that controls the lighting in the VOR/LOC indicator....


5

There are instrument panel and flood light controls which are equipped with a rheostat so they can either be dimmed or turned off all together.


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