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I found this snippet from Flight Mechanics of High-Performance Aircraft, by Nguyen here. I'm not sure if this answer is consistent with the answer given Ugo..


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The only1 instrument that directly indicates the bank angle is the attitude indicator, also (especially formerly) known as the "artificial horizon". As another answer has noted, many other instruments give indirect indications of bank angle, and by using them appropriately, it is quite possible to keep the wings level even with no direct indication of the ...


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Many instruments can indicate roll. Here is a list in order of Primacy according to the Primary-Secondary Method of Instrument Flying: Heading Indicator Attitude Indicator Turn Coordinator Rate of Turn Indicator (when TC is absent) Inclinometer (actually only measures coordination) In the Control-Performance Method of Instrument Flying, and what most ...


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Have a look at http://zeteamfirst.free.fr/pilotage/anemo/asi_4.htm It states the Saint Venant equation as being: \begin{equation} Pt - Ps = \frac{1}{2}\rho V_p^2 \Bigl(1+\frac{M^2}{4}\Bigr) \end{equation} where: $Pt$ : total pressure $Ps$: static pressure $\rho$: air density $V_p$: TAS $M$: Mach number calculated as ratio of TAS/speed of sound. ...


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I was taught in and flew single and twin Pipers, Beechcraft and Cesnas in the 1980's. All these aircraft had the Russian style FAI, although we referred to them as ground pointers. I'm now flying modern glass cockpits using Western (skypointer) FAI. Although I understand the logic in the Western instrument is better, personally I prefer the Russian style. 10,...


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The reasons for TWO boxes are most likely that they came up with the idea for a cockpit voice recorder first, and later decided to add another one for data. The magnetic tape and other formats first used took up a lot of space and to put both in one box would have been a big heavy box the size of two put together. These are about 20 pounds each, a ...


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