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Most conventional aircraft are designed so that their Center of Gravity (COG) is forward of their Center of Lift (COL). When an aircraft banks for a turn, weight and centrifugal force combine to increase the Load acting through the COG. In order for the Aircraft not to lose altitude, the vertical component of Lift must continue to be equal to weight. The ...


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This is because when you roll left (or right), the lift changes from pushing up to pushing up and to the left. This is what makes you turn. Since some of that lift is being used the the left, not as much is pushing up, causing the plane to lose a bit of altitude. On FlyByWire aircraft, since it is computer controlled, the computer automatically compensates ...


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So you want to know whether a given aircraft will initially yaw to the left or to the right when struck by a sudden gust of wind from the left. Where should the pivot point be in a wind-tunnel model? It should be at the C.G., assuming that you are modeling the aircraft in flight and not in some other configuration such as rolling along with some portion of ...


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These planes typically pull out of a dive on their own, but then climb excessively and stall, leading to another dive. R/C flying can be started at an early age and gives any potential pilot a huge head start in gaining experience in the all important fundamentals of flight. A lesson in the importance of keeping CG within the specified range (and the ...


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Damping is produced by drag and by large induced speeds at the tail surfaces from a given disturbance. This can be caused by long lever arms of these surfaces or by high air density. More on the topic can be found here: What is aerodynamic damping? Will control surfaces on a plane be less efficient at a higher altitude?. The lower density at high altitude ...


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Lots of good information in answers posted so far but I think it is also useful to point out that with no static stability (in the pitch axis), the aircraft wouldn't be trimmable. With positive static stability (in the pitch axis), you can trim for a given airspeed, and if you then pull the stick aft, you'll feel an increasing forward pressure on the stick, ...


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If an aircraft is statically stable, it will always return to equilibrium after a disturbance. But what happens after can either show instability or stability. This is where the dynamic stability comes in. You can think of an aircraft at equilibrium at a particular speed, altitude and angle of attack and it is suddenly faced with a disturbance which changes ...


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Static stability means that a deviation from a trimmed state produces forces which return the system to this trimmed state. If these forces produce an overshoot which increases over time, such that the system oscillates around this trim point with increasing amplitude, the system is dynamically unstable. The long period oscillation (phygoid) of gliders is ...


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Static stability is the initial response of a plane to an instant impulse (like a turbulence), while dynamic stability is how a plane responds over time to a disturbance. Dynamic stability can be verified by pulling/pushing one flight control surface and instantly letting it go: oscillations on the related axis can increase in amplitude, decrease in ...


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It seems to me that the crux of the misunderstanding in your question is here: If I then add power and climb (while holding the same attitude) If you hold the elevator in a fixed position and add power, the airplane will pitch up relative to the ground, to the extent needed to preserve the original angle of attack relative to the airplane's motion through ...


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Wolfgang Langewiesche is right to appropriate order of approximation. For every elevator position a statically stable airplane settles to a specific equilibrium angle of attack. That's how static stability works. Airplane is statically stable if and only if increasing angle of attack causes higher increase in coefficient of lift on the aft airfoil (tail for ...


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There is a contradiction built into the question. You write: Consider a certain elevator position for straight and level flight at cruise rpm. If I then add power and climb (while holding the same attitude) isn't it true the Angle of Attack will increase because the relative wind is now coming from in front and above the plane? If this is true, then how ...


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For a given airspeed, there is exactly one distinct angle of attack possible resulting in straight stabilized flight. If it would be higher or lower in any moment, there is excessive or insufficient lift and forces are no longer in balance. It gets "adjusted" thanks to airplane designed longitudinal stability by either readjusting change in pitch, ...


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If you add power while holding the same attitude you will accelerate. As you accelerate you will have to hold the nose down and trim, (gradually changing your attitude) but this will actually decrease rather than increase the AOA. Unless you want to climb. If you add power and pitch up to hold the same airspeed, you will climb at the same AOA and airspeed ...


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Your understanding of AoA is correct. While the elevators do influence AoA they don’t control it, so you’re right that a particular elevator position doesn’t correspond to a particular AoA. You example is flawed though - if you increase power to climb then your AoA might not change at all, or not significantly.


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A turn in level flight can be modeled as an earth referenced circle. Therefor any forces that move the plane in curved flight around that circle can be broken into forward and inward vectors. The inward vector is centripetal force. It is important to stay with the earth referenced result of forces created by the aircraft, because there are many ways (some ...


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If the airplane banks without a change in pitch, then it will accelerate sideways and build up a sideslip angle while at the same time losing altitude because the cosine of the lift vector will be too small to counterbalance all weight. This downwards motion will increase the angle of attack a bit so the airplane settles at a higher angle of attack, a slight ...


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There are some subtle issues at play here. I'm not sure that your question is really recognizing the difference between an established turn and a developing turn, i.e. a turn entry. The fundamental characteristic of a turn is a curvature in the flight path, and the fundamental cause of a curvature in the flight path is a net centripetal force. The primary ...


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Centripetal force is defined as the component of the total force acting on the object that is causing it to follow a circular path. It is the force exactly perpendicular to the velocity vector. To create a circular path, the force needs to turn with the velocity. If you have a force that keeps its spatial orientation, less of it will be centripetal and more ...


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