6

This is bordering on opinion based as its a bit subjective from person to person but generally speaking flight attendants and pilots are more accustomed to the typical stressors of flight and potentially less subject to them after some time as the human body adjusts. Perhaps more importantly this is also their day job, its what they do. When you get on a ...


5

The industry standard is to switch the seat belts signs off while crossing 10,000 ft. And this is usually the moment when flight attendants get up. But really depends on company policies as you saw. Even within the same airline there may be different standards for different fleet, which actually depends more on timing for service that on safety. In any case,...


5

I think that in United Airlines Flight 232 Dennis E. Fitch did. While flying as a passenger on this flight, he actually was a certified flight instructor for the plane of that type so competent. Chances to find a type-rated ATP between the passengers who would fly as if nothing may look slim but they are not zero. It is statistically more probable to find a ...


4

Yes (well not an emergency), Aeroflot Flight Flight 593 was a fairly famous incident where the pilots son (a passenger on the flight) was in the cockpit and playing with the controls. He accidentally disconnected the autopilot and lead to the aircrafts ultimate crash. Unlike his sister, Eldar applied enough force to the control column to contradict the ...


2

Sitting still is surprisingly tiring. Flight attendants are up and moving around for most of the flight, and that physical activity helps keep them awake. They're also more accustomed to the lower oxygen levels and other physical and mental stresses of flight, similar to pilots, so even if the activity levels were the same, they'd be better able to handle ...


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