8

I emailed the SAS museum in Oslo to inquire about the acronyms in this photo description. It took awhile, but I finally got the following reply: I'm a retired SAS-captain volunteering at our museum. These codes are IATA communication codes. CPH is Copenhagen airport, CV is the name of a SAS-sub group, the cabin attendant's group there. So if I were to send ...


8

When I was flight crew on CRJs for a private operator we got abbreviated FA training for pilots, which was mostly a kind of crowd control course, taught by a contract FA. Their training is about managing a chaotic cabin full or panicking passengers. FA's are more or less under-cover riot control cops who spend their careers working as servers/attendants and ...


8

It totally depends on the airline and is different from one airline to another. There is no standard way of distributing schedules. Some of the ways that I have personally experienced or have seen it: Bids by seniority: The crew will bid for flights/rosters based on their seniority. Juniors will cry rivers. Fair share: The crew will get turns, if you take ...


5

In almost two decades of flying for airlines, I've never seen it done, and never heard of any program to facilitate such staffing.


3

It depends where you are flying, i.e. which countries rules apply. In the US for example, the minimum cabin crew is determined by the seating capacity: For airplanes having a seating capacity of more than 100 passengers—two flight attendants plus one additional flight attendant for each unit (or part of a unit) of 50 passenger seats above a seating ...


3

Most pilots are not currently qualified to serve as flight attendants, but they could be trained easily enough following an abbreviated syllabus. Since pilots are already familiar with all the aircraft emergency equipment and procedures, training would just need to focus on specific tasks in different areas of the cabin. That, plus operation of beverage and ...


3

The airline will bring in contract instructors to do the training (yes there are freelancers out there that do that sort of thing as contractors). If they don't have the number of active crews to justify full time instructors because they only need someone for 5 or 10 days a month, that's the normal alternative. The airline will still be paying the ...


2

At least some of the remarks here show a very poor understanding of what cabin crew are and what they do. No, pilots cannot replace cabin crew without substantial formal training. Cabin crew are highly trained professionals, just like pilots. It's true that unlike pilots they are not in command of the machinery, and that their role requires them to do many ...


2

I can only speak for carriers following FAA regulations. But, It was probably a company policy change. I have a copy of the 2017 FAR/AIM. I don’t remember there being a change since then. One reason for an air carrier, whether large or small, to use a standard format and phrases is to make sure that every flight and cabin crew completes all of the required ...


1

It could work both ways. Having a steward that is qualified to fly or "sit in" as a flight engineer in high workload situations (take off/landing/illness to pilot or copilot/inclement weather/aircraft malfuction) would be an asset, especially on a smaller carrier. Pilots could also add diversity to their job by rotating to serve passengers, if ...


1

"Flight attendants stand by for all call" commands the cabin crew to be ready at their station to report to the chief purser via intercom. See the explanation on this and other airline phraseology on askthepilot.com


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