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8

While this is an interesting idea, there are some key issues with it. As a GA pilot, here are my issues with that concept. Changing flap settings causes signifigant differences in aircraft handling. If I was, say, on short final, and I changed my aircraft's configuration - it would be difficult to maintain a stable approach profile to the runway. If I were ...


7

Yes, but. Flaps will change the pitch equilibrium to nose-up when moved up, so when you want to increase your lift coefficient, you need to reduce the maximum lift coefficient to make the airplane pitch up. This makes flaps much less suitable for take-off and landing than the elevator, but you can control airplanes with flaps only under some conditions. You ...


2

Can you use control surfaces to control an aircraft? Yes. Are flaps controls a way to control the control surfaces? Yes. Can you use them to control an aircraft? Yes. Could you land this way? Possibly. Is this something you should try? No. Flaps are a slow, clumsy and coarse method to modify your control surfaces and there are all sorts of attendant ...


2

The cockpit indication would be that the flaps don't retract as expected. The subsequent flap overspeed would then be captured by the Flight Data Recorder, the same as any other exceedance. But I'm unaware of any specific indication on a cockpit display that indicates directly "the Flap Load Relief isn't working".


1

The issue is how one wants to optimize their flight operations. Generally the emphasis is on time to climb, however for some operations, such as out of standing snow, slush, mud and grass, and in the case of seaplanes, glassy water, the preferred optimization may be to minimize ground roll, rolling drag, tire wear or other factors. I teach both techniques, ...


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