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7

I don't know of any privately owned Hawks, but there are many ex-RAF jets in private ownership, like the Jet Provost, Lightning, Gnat, Meteor, Vampire, and others I can't remember. The Ministry of Defence sells fixed-wing airplanes and helicopters occasionally at auction; when they retire the Hawk T1 you could be able to pick one up. This CAA document goes ...


2

Sometimes. Some fighters were designed with two seats from the start, such as the F-4 and the F-14. These planes had complicated radar systems and they needed a specialist operator. While flying them, pilots have found that having a person in the back seat who can look out for enemy fighters is very handy. Most single seat fighters, such as the F-15 and F-16 ...


5

Typically yes, but they generally won't be training a new pilot one day and flying a night bombing sortie the next. Two seat trainers are intentionally very similar to their single seat counterparts. (for obvious reasons!) A pilot training in a squadron to replace front line fleet F/A-18E pilots will likely conduct early stage familiarization flights in ...


4

Although my experience and knowledge in this field is from a computer science background and likely much less than other posters, I recently watched the Alpha Dogfight Trials, which I think you would find interesting as it is highly pertinent to your question. The basis on which an enemy simulated aircraft was determined to be shot down was based on the ...


52

Bear in mind that most of my maneuvering was done from a defensive position due to the aircraft I flew, and that my experience spanned a period 15-30 years ago. But, I have some perspective that may help answer the question. First, as a comment mentioned, some are decided at the bar later. (with hands shooting down watches…) We also had a saying: “First ...


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