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2

Because they don't want to be seen. Are fighters allowed to just turn off their transponders in civilian airspace? FR24 and ADS-B Ex are not based on normal transponders (that would require access to actual RADAR data) but rather ADS-B and mode-S transponders. The military can simply choose not to operate with this equipment. This does not make the ...


40

Source: F-16 Flight Manual (T.O. GR1F-16CJ-1) It is pressurized yes. Above you can see the schedule. Note that at high altitudes the cockpit altitude would be considered high (low pressure) and insufficient to avoid hypoxia. If the oxygen system (OBOGS) fails, the procedure is to "Descend to cockpit altitude below 10,000 feet", which is about 24,000–26,000 ...


51

Yes, the cockpit of the F-16 is pressurized. However, there are two types of cabin pressurization: Isobaric Pressurisation: The system maintains a constant cabin pressure (usually between 2000 and 8000 ft) as the atmospheric pressure decreases. This is used in commercial aircraft. Hypobaric Pressurisation: In such a system the pressurisation commences at a ...


8

Yes. Like most fighters the cockpit of an F-16 is pressurized, primarily for pilot comfort. Use of an oxygen mask is required equipment for high altitude operations and for emergency situations. The pilot has a pressure breathing on demand oxygen mask, which is required equipment for high-altitude operations.


2

Brief answer: Yes, but the protection does not always work. Most modern fighter aircraft have an AoA limiter. That is different from a stall warning – in case of the McDonnell Douglas F-4 the limit was only 23 degree, below the stall limit. The reason for the limit was the loss of directional stability above 23 degree AoA. In case of the JAS-39 Gripen the ...


3

A fighter with "upswept wings and the downswept rear wings with just one tail"? sounds like an F-4. BTW, "upswept" is called a "dihedral", and "downswept" is an "anhedral".


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Every fly-by-wire type has protective measures to keep it within the designated flight envelope. In the case of agile fighters capable of the Cobra and suchlike, they are designed to maintain predictable airflow at extreme angles of attack, long after the conventional flow over the wing has broken away. Typically this will involve vortex lift at intermediate ...


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Assuming you can find a modern supersonic engine that physically fits, then yes it can in principle be fitted. But if you mean could it then go supersonic, no it could not. It is not designed either aerodynamically or structurally for supersonic flight. Drag would build sharply at transonic speeds, due primarily to the straight, unswept wing and tailplane. ...


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The Albatross family of jets will only have the third world market as it stands. 1st and 2nd world markets are beginning to be dominated by supersonic trainers, so the question isn't without merit. You don't build trainer jets just for aerobatics. As others mentioned, the wing is too straight, and the stabilizer isn't all-moving. You need both, or it will ...


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