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Aside from the eloquent discussion of reducing "negative side-slip induced rolling moments" (putting larger spats on the wheels would do that too), delving into the lost art of horizontal stabilizer design has yielded an interesting thought: Under normal flight conditions the tail usually exerts a downforce to keep the center of pressure aligned (...


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To save you the bother to look it up yourself, I copy the sentence here that @ymb1 is referring to in his comment: The canted tips of the original DA42 are working like an anhedral and create a compensating positive rolling moment for the vertical tail's negative sideslip-induced rolling moment. Ideally, the whole horizontal tail would have anhedral, but it ...


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Late answer but.....extending speed brakes/airbrakes during an approach allows the aeroplane to fly slower because it changes the aerodynamic characteristics (specifically the relationship between lift and drag). The drag caused by the speedbrakes increased the total drag but reduces the speed where the "drag curve" graph is at its lowest. As a ...


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You have a very interesting find there! It is in fact not an engine from a B707, but a Kuznetsov NK-8 from Russia. It was used in Ilyushin Il-62 and Tupolev Tu-154 aircraft. As for the intermediate vanes, it is my understanding that their purpose is no more special, than to just stabilize the airflow entering the bypass section of the engine. (Picture taken ...


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