Hot answers tagged

41

A license, once granted, is good forever (barring some enforcement action). But, you need more than just a license to fly. To use your license, while flying solo, you also need a Medical Certificate (if required for the aircraft or flight rules) and a Current BFR (Biennial Flight Review). Medical Certificates are good for 5 years until you're 40, then ...


17

From a private pilot's perspective, there are two possible options: a foreign-based license or a 'full' FAA pilot's license. The first type is defined in 14 CFR 61.75, which starts like this: §61.75 Private pilot certificate issued on the basis of a foreign pilot license. (a) General. A person who holds a foreign pilot license at the private ...


14

The FAA Safety Team's WINGS program allows pilots to bypass the traditional FAR 61.56 flight review by completing a "phase" of the WINGS program. The program and requirements are detailed in FAA Advisory Circular 61-91 (currently 61-91J). The short version is that a "phase" of WINGS consists of three credits of "flight activities" and three credits of "...


13

Yes, night landings satisfy the requirements of §61.57(a)(1) for both nighttime and daytime currency. The wording of the regulation is not crystal clear, and some (including me) have thought that the wording of (a)(2) required daytime landings for daytime currency. This is not the case, per the following interpretation from the FAA (Springfield, IL FSDO, ...


13

For the FAA, a "complex aeroplane" must have: A retractable gear (not necessary for a seaplane); In-flight adjustable flaps; and A controllable pitch propeller. The FAA's definition is given in 14 CFR 61.1: Complex airplane means an airplane that has a retractable landing gear, flaps, and a controllable pitch propeller, including airplanes equipped ...


12

The plain and simple answer to your updated question is that once you get your pilot license, it is good forever. You can go 50 years without flying, and the license itself is still valid. When it comes time to fly again, depending on the type of airplane that you want to fly, you will probably also need a medical. You will need to have a Flight Review ...


10

Yes and Yes; As long as you are rated for the category, class, and type (if required) of the aircraft that you are receiving the training in you could log both PIC and dual received. 14 CFR 61.51(e)(i) covers the logging of PIC time (which is perfectly legal in the scenario that you describe if you are rated in the aircraft): §61.51 Pilot logbooks. ...


10

I believe the answer, at least in the US is 20 hours of flight time, plus however long a checkride takes. A sport pilot can carry a single passenger and the minimum requirements are outlined in 14 CFR §61.313: If you are applying for a sport pilot certificate with [...] Airplane category and single-engine land or sea class privileges, Then you must log at ...


9

The document you cite actually goes on to explain what the procedure is for calculators, and when testing centers can prevent you from using your own (you'll be provided a loaner): Testing centers may provide a calculator to you and/or deny use of your personal calculator based on the following limitations: a. Prior to, and upon completion ...


8

Yes, it counts: the FAA doesn't care where flying hours are accumulated provided that the US written and/or practical test requirements are met. I learned to fly in South Africa then applied for an unrestricted FAA license (i.e. not a foreign based license). The FSDO told me that I could count all my time in SA (cross-countries, night flights etc.) towards ...


8

Not technically. You could opt to surrender your private pilot certificate to the FAA thus making you not a pilot, and then you could take a checkride for recreational. Of course, there is no reason to do this at all! You can do the same things as long as you're exercising the privileges of the lower certificate, then whatever medical rules are there ...


7

Unfortunately, no. 135.225 - IFR: Takeoff, approach and landing minimums (e) requires: The MDA or DA/DH and visibility landing minimums prescribed in part 97 of this chapter or in the operator's operations specifications are increased by 100 feet and 1⁄2 mile respectively, but not to exceed the ceiling and visibility minimums for that airport when ...


7

Solo time is always PIC time. You're alone in the aircraft, so who else could be PIC? 14 CFR 61.51(e)(ii): (e) Logging pilot-in-command flight time. (1) A sport, recreational, private, commercial, or airline transport pilot may log pilot in command flight time for flights- [...] (ii) When the pilot is the sole occupant in the aircraft;


6

Yes, night landings count for day currency. 61.57(a)(1) explains: Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section, no person may act as a pilot in command of an aircraft carrying passengers or of an aircraft certificated for more than one pilot flight crewmember unless that person has made at least three takeoffs and three landings within the preceding ...


6

Nope, sorry! If you need a flight review, use an LSA you have been endorsed for. §61.56(c)(1) states that a flight review must be: Accomplished [...] in an aircraft for which that pilot is rated According to the AOPA (note: this article is specifically targeted at non-Sport pilots): Rated is interpreted as category and class [emphasis mine] And in ...


5

Yes. Your interpretation is the correct one. Several FAA legal interpretations cover the "calendar months" phrasing; the best I could find was the Harvey interpretation from 2012: Based on the facts that you have presented, a biennial flight review accomplished on April 2, 2002, would not lapse until May 1, 2004. Basically, your flight review is legal ...


5

Yes, you can still log PIC time if you are appropriately rated for that aircraft, aside from the endorsement. For example, if you are a Private Pilot, Airplane Single-Engine Land working on an endorsement in a Piper J-3 Cub, you would be able to log PIC time during your tailwheel training because the Cub is a single-engine land airplane. The same goes for ...


5

There is no simple answer to this question because it depends how much you fly and how much time you need to re-learn after not flying for a while. A US private pilot's license never expires, but you do lose currency. The recurring training requirement is in 14 CFR 61.56: you must pass a biennial flight review (BFR) every two years, which consists of one ...


5

Yes, the FAA issued a Letter of Interpretation from their Chief Counsel in May 2015 which covers Section 61.58 proficiency checks and specifically addresses this issue. It says that a pilot may continue to act as PIC during the grace month under Parts 91, 121, and 135. It says (in part, and emphasis added by me): Section 61.58(i) states that, if a ...


5

Short answer: yes, if the training has been logged with the remark that it meets the requirements of both 61.129 and 61.65. This topic became confusing because of an FAA interpretation that says: [...] are the requirements of 14 C.F.R. §61.129(c)(3)(i) [commercial certificate] met by the student getting an instrument rating or training for an ...


5

"Total time" isn't an officially defined term as far as I know. Most people seem to use it to mean "total flight time", i.e. the total of their PIC, SIC and flight training time (excluding simulator training). In general, you can log and count whatever you want in your logbook provided that you log at least the items required in 61.51(a): (a) Training ...


4

Zero, if you bring along a flight instructor :-) You fly the plane, the flight instructor keeps you safe and legal, and your passenger sits in the back seat.


4

All Wings courses that qualify for a Flight Review include both a online knowledge activites as well as required flight activities that are verified by a CFI. These flight requirements generally end up being longer than the 1 hr minimum flight time required by §61.56. But if you are completing a Wings course for the purpose of insurance discounts, a BRF ...


4

Glad you asked! I referenced historical FARs from 2013, 1993, 1988, and 1969. Here's what I found:


3

Note Part 61.31(c): (c) Aircraft category, class, and type ratings: Limitations on the carriage of persons, or operating for compensation or hire. Unless a person holds a category, class, and type rating (if a class and type rating is required) that applies to the aircraft, that person may not act as pilot in command of an aircraft that is ...


3

Why yes, it has, and the history along with the preambles and lots of other good information is available on the FAA's Regulatory Guidance Library. Click the image and then click on Historical CFR and then By Part and follow the tree to 61.57 to see the history: More details are available here: How can I see the revision history of a particular FAR?


3

It's an ICAO requirement, basically it's just official documentation showing that you've been trained and are competent to act as SIC in a given airplane. ICAO is an organization that standardizes regulations and procedures among the participating countries (close to 200 if I recall). If you fly as SIC internationally you'll probably need an SIC type ...


3

A U.S. pilot can apply for a SIC type rating after receiving instruction specific to that airplane to include: Operational procedures applicable to the powerplant, equipment, and systems. Performance specifications and limitations. Normal, abnormal, and emergency operating procedures. Flight manual. Placards and markings The applicant will then need ...


3

FAR 61.57(a)(2) is for the purpose of fulfilling (a)(1). Meaning, if you are out of day currency than you must make day landings. If are day current, then night landings will qualify to continue your day currency.


3

All of the people here are correct. Your license has no expiration date, but your medical does, depending on your age. I personally went 15 years without flying. This year I got my medical set and needed some time with an instructor to get the feel back for the plane. I am back in the saddle after 7 hours with an instructor and the biennial flight review ...


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