Hot answers tagged

21

The obvious answer you mentioned should be reiterated: Avoid thunderstorms whenever possible! Just because there are "best penetrating altitudes" doesn't change the fact that thunderstorms are extremely hazardous to aircraft and should be avoided in the first place. With that said, the FAA's Advisory Circular 00-24C mentions that, if unable to avoid ...


13

Lets start with 14 CFR 135.125, which defines security requirements for part 135 flights: §135.125 Aircraft security. Certificate holders conducting operators conducting operations under this part must comply with the applicable security requirements in 49 CFR chapter XII. We pass the ball to 49 CFR 1544 and make sure we're in the right place: §...


12

Note that if you operate under §135.267(b), that there isn't any specific duty time definition -- there are only regulations concerning the maximum flight time and minimum rest time in §135.267(d) (see this question for the definition of rest time). In a FAA Civil Penalty Order, it is noted that duty time is: any time that is not a rest period. If you're ...


7

Since you're asking if it's required then I believe the answer is no. First, just to include the information from another answer, the AIM 4-2-4 only says "should", not "must" (my emphasis): 4. Air Taxi or other commercial operators not having FAA authorized call signs should prefix their normal identification with the phonetic word "Tango." ...


7

Unfortunately, no. 135.225 - IFR: Takeoff, approach and landing minimums (e) requires: The MDA or DA/DH and visibility landing minimums prescribed in part 97 of this chapter or in the operator's operations specifications are increased by 100 feet and 1⁄2 mile respectively, but not to exceed the ceiling and visibility minimums for that airport when ...


6

FAR Part 135.91 notes that medical oxygen containers - whether for the storage, generation, or dispensing of oxygen - must be: 135.91.a.1.i Of an approved type or in conformity with the manufacturing, packaging, marking, labeling, and maintenance requirements of title 49 CFR parts 171, 172, and 173, except §173.24(a)(1) 135.91.a.1.ii When owned by ...


6

Required runway length for landing The minimum runway length required for landing under Part 135 operations is, believe it or not, the same as Part 91: You need to be able to land and stop within the available runway length specified in the AFM. This is what you use when you are getting ready to land. That being said, since you reference the "60%/80% ...


6

The 10 hours of rest need to be uninterrupted, planned, and not spent on call. Essentially, the pilots need to have 10 hours in which they are not obligated to do any work for the company at all. Note that it does not mean "10 hours of sleep", and it is up to the pilot what they do with their time off. (They can even technically fly for another 135 ...


6

It took me a little bit to figure out the underlying reason for asking this question and it has to do with logging flight time. For example, in a single pilot operation with an autopilot, the second pilot is not required and therefore cannot log the flight time at all even though their company may want them there. The FARs don't allow the second pilot to ...


6

There is an ongoing issue with this, as far as I am aware. First off, this does not apply to part 91, and nothing does as far as I am aware: you can get your weather from anywhere, but having it on record with FSS or DUATs gives you a little more padding if something goes wrong. If you're going to get weather online, which most large operations do, the FAA ...


5

Yes, a GPS approach can satisfy the criteria of a navigational facility for the purposes of Table 1 in Ops Spec C055. The FAA gives the following guidance in Notice 8900.218, Alternate Airport IFR Weather Minimums: G. 5) Planning for use of GPS-based IAP must be based on a single navigational facility when determining the approach facility ...


5

Yes, the FAA issued a Letter of Interpretation from their Chief Counsel in May 2015 which covers Section 61.58 proficiency checks and specifically addresses this issue. It says that a pilot may continue to act as PIC during the grace month under Parts 91, 121, and 135. It says (in part, and emphasis added by me): Section 61.58(i) states that, if a ...


5

I was asked this question on a 135 ride. Stumped for an answer, I was told I will get comfortable flying through if I wanted the job. As this was in the plains, 5000 or 6000 depending on the direction of the flight was the recipe. Not high enough for icing most of the time, yet enough altitude to recover from downdrafts. This also kept us in Approach/...


5

0 AGL. Do not ever penetrate a thunderstorm in an airplane. It is stupid. People die that way every year.


5

Updating a navigation database used to be considered preventative maintenance and was required to be performed by a mechanic under Part 135. However, the regulations were changed at the end of 2012 (here is the final rule) and it no longer falls under this category so pilots are allowed to update "aeronautical databases" (a new term) if it is "easy" to do (...


4

I assume that by updating you mean loading a pre-compiled database into the FMS, replacing the old one. The RNAV database inside the FMS should be updated according to the 28 day Aeronautical Information Regulation and Control (AIRAC) cycle. Typically this is a maintenance task and the pilot has no play in this. Of course if the pilot also holds the ...


4

Operational control is defined in 8900.1 Volume 3, Chapter 25 as: Operational control functions include, but are not limited to: Preflight planning; For part 121 operations, preparation and dissemination of dispatch/flight releases; Canceling a flight due to potential hazardous or unsafe conditions; Ensuring that only those operations ...


3

AIM 4-2-4, part A. 4. Air Taxi or other commercial operators not having FAA authorized call signs should prefix their normal identification with the phonetic word "Tango." EXAMPLE- Tango Aztec Two Four Six Four Alpha. It was pre-911 but not often used. It is just a way for operators who have no callsign to let ATC know that they are a charter ...


3

Any flights operated by a certificate holder must be operated in accordance with the authorization of their certificate. Authorization will vary. An Air Carrier may conduct training1 flights under §91 if authorized to do so. If not authorized, any flights operated by that Air Carrier—including training flights—must be conducted under the part of 14 CFR (§...


3

Part 91 contains the General Operating and Flight Rules. These rules apply to almost every civil flight within the USA. Part 135 contains the Operating Requirements for Commuter and on-demand operations and the rules governing persons on board such aircraft. So when you fly the "Part 91 flight", you follow the regulations of Part 91. When you fly the "...


3

I found something relevant buried in the depths of JO 7340.2 on contractions (i.e. abbreviations) for airlines, aircraft types etc. Section 1-4-2 says: The company designator, together with a flight number, serves as the aircraft identification in the ATC system. Company designators are valid only for company business in accordance with the provisions ...


3

The FAA has not defined those terms in §1.1 or elsewhere in the FARs and as such common language definitions are used. Make would be the manufacturer and model is aircraft family group but as J Walters mentioned not the subgroup. I would personally define make and model aircraft based on whether or not the type certificate data sheet is the same for those ...


3

TL;DR: The make of an aircraft is the name of the designer (for example, Boeing) and the model of an aircraft (also called the type) is the designation for the general design of the aircraft (for example, 737). It looks like "basic model" is just an older term for "model". According to FAA Order 8000.71: c. Aircraft Make. An aircraft make is the name ...


2

The only way you can carry passengers for hire as a common carrier without an air carrier cert (either 121 or 135) is the sightseeing exemption -- 25 SM, landing at point of takeoff. However you will still need an LOA and to participate in an approved drug enforcement program. If there is a 'commonality of purpose' e.g. all the passengers are employees of ...


2

Do the Part 135 rules allow single-engine turboprop night IFR Part-135 operations? Yes, there is nothing preventing it provided the pilot is night current and the airports are suitable for night operation. You can find the FAA's 135 general requirements here.


1

I have not checked the latest regs, but the time beginning at the point where the pilot is done with all postflight duties until the time the preflight duties begin (ex. checking weather) is considered rest time ONLY IF the pilot is really off the clock. If the company requires anything of the pilot (ex. "stay near the plane...just in case"), it is not rest ...


1

Biofuel has already been considered and tested on some aircrafts. Here you can find an article about tests.It states at least six of them At least six airlines, including KLM, Lufthansa and Finnair, have now used biofuel on flights carrying passengers. However there is still a long way to go.On wikipedia it says The sustainable aviation fuels ...


1

The "T" (Tango) designation is required to be used by controllers, as per the Air Traffic Controller's Handbook: Section 4. Radio and Interphone Communications 2−4−20. AIRCRAFT IDENTIFICATION Use the full identification in reply to aircraft with similar sounding identifications. For other aircraft, the same identification may be used in ...


1

You're asking a couple of different questions here, I think. Neither FSIMS nor the FARs specify whether a particular checkride flight must be conducted under part 91 or 135/121. Regarding medical certificates, FSIMS 5-887 indicates that for ATP 121/135 applicants: CREW QUALIFICATIONS. The crew, with the exception of the applicant, must be qualified and ...


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