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1

The testing requirements are spelled out in 14 CFR §61.183(d)(e)(f), which require you to received a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor to take the fundamentals of instruction knowledge exam. These requirements can be waived if you are currently employed as a teacher in junior high or high school or are a college professor. The only other ...


2

Nowadays most communications between Europe and the US is over AMHS (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeronautical_Message_Handling_System)


0

With no reversion to a direct mode, ie retaining control of the engine possibly with limitation after fadec failure would imply DAL A since that fault results in loss of ability to maintain flight. With some form of control reversion, the authorities would accept a much lower dal. You cannot claim credit for the second engine since both engines use ...


20

It is the year followed by the day of the year of the last ammendment to the chart. If there have been no changes to the chart since it was first issued, this space is blank. In this case the chart was revised on the 171st day of 2019. If you look at the bottom left hand portion of the chart, the date shows the last time the procedure was revised e.g.—...


1

It really depends on the aircraft. In most certified light piston training aircraft it's a non-event as described in other answers. In the Lancair 320/360 and Legacy which have forward-hinged canopies instead of side doors, and have much higher wing / tail loading than the typical trainers, it can be quite deadly. Beyond the pilot distraction factor, the ...


1

A door popping open in a GA aircraft is not considered an emergency. I have not seen it in the FAR/AIM. I don’t have a POH in front of me. If memory serves me correctly, the POH for a 2015 and later Piper Archer has this event listed under the category of Abnormal Procedures. There is a separate category for Emergency Procedures. On the checklists for three ...


1

A door popping open is not an emergency in itself, it has to cause a threat to the safety of the flight or those on the ground to be an emergency. I've had doors pop open in a light aircraft in flight and it has been a non-event every time, I didn't mention it to ATC as there was no reason to, I just told maintenance once I was on the ground. I've never seen ...


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