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33

There are a few which do (none of them in production, though) and the reason is the added weight and restrictions in varying nozzle geometry for best efficiency. The tail arrangement of the F-4 is the result of its heritage. Early McDonnell jets all had the fuselage extended past the engine exhaust in order to shift the engine mass forward, near the wings, ...


28

Your daughter is right as explained here: The 'bug-eyed' face of the parabrake door mounting the two rear-hemisphere radar warning antennas. So they do detect other airplanes and probably the smiles of their pilots too as they are getting close to the phantom.


23

Here's a photo: Retired Lt. Col. Thomas Mudge, a ground controller for the 82nd Aerial Targets Squadron, remotely pilots a QF-4 during a Combat Archer mission May 12, 2015 at Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. QF-4s were retired in 2016. They are now flying the QF-16.


15

The heat-seeking missiles of the time when the F-4 entered service were fairly limited compared to newer designs, and had to be targeted at an angle where they had a good view of the tailpipe of an aircraft. This changed somewhere around the late 70s when all-aspect missiles were introduced, allowing aircraft to be targeted from other angles as well. I've ...


12

As several of the comments have mentioned, the F-4 have the option of folding the outermost section of their wings, as shown in the picture below. The main purpose of this was simply to save precious space on aircraft carriers, it had no use when flying. There have been some incidents where wings have either started to fold during flight or where the pilot ...


11

(flickr.com) On a real F-4 it's the flap-shaped switch on the left console aft and left of the thrust levers. Also here is the cockpit items poster (see item no. 5 on the left).


10

No. The empennage on the F-4 was never laid out in that manner to shield against IR guided missiles tracking it not could the design aid in doing so. Like the increased dihedral or the outboard sections of the wing the severe anhedral angle of the tailplane is more or less a cheap patch for poor aerodynamic design. The 23° anhedral to the tailplanes were ...


8

That's not an eyepiece, it's a glare shield. The angle of the display made it susceptible to glare from light entering the cockpit. The shield made it easier to see, at night as well. My theory is that they got the idea from Star Trek. Spock had one too on his workstation on the Enterprise. 🤣


8

In U.S. Navy and Marine Corps F-4 Phantoms, the wing fold mechanism was controlled and powered by hydraulics, since the pilot had to fold the wings after landing for taxiing around on the deck. The USAF versions of the Phantom, on the other hand, had this hydraulic capability removed, and there was a pin in the top of the wing, (if I recall), just inboard of ...


8

The statement is accurate. Here is a list of all U.S. Fighter Aircraft, in service and retired on Wikipedia. The following is an excerpt from that list for relevant aircraft. F-4 Phantom (Air Force/Navy/Marines) F-5 Freedom Fighter (Navy) F-6 Skyray (Navy/Marines) F-7 Sea Dart (Navy) F-8 Crusader (Navy) F-9 Cougar (Navy) F-10 Skynight (Navy/Marines) F-11 ...


7

The test was carried out by the Sandia National Laboratories under terms of a contract with the Muto Institute of Structural Mechanics, Inc., of Tokyo. The purpose of the test: ... was to determine the impact force, versus time, due to the impact, of a complete F-4 Phantom — including both engines — onto a massive, essentially rigid reinforced concrete ...


7

The F-4 radar was a low PRF pulse radar, designed to search for, acquire, and track other airborne aircraft, and then provide guidance for Aim-7 Sparrow air-to-air missiles. It also had a ground mapping capability, and a capability to detect and display severe weather, but it was primarily designed for air-to-air combat. Later models of the F-4 had an more ...


6

The Energy Maneuverability theory is primarily a conceptual design framework. Its role is to be a guideline in creating the requirements for your aircraft. This is something well above the manufacturer's level of responsibility. The requirements are created by the buyer, like the US DoD; the manufacturer's job is to design a machine to meet them, with some ...


6

No, the two sides of the Stabilator are connected to one another and move in unison. The following is from the USAF F-4E flight manual, page 1-21.


6

Farhan is correct that these "bug eyes" are part of the radar warning system, but unfortunately is incorrect as to what that system actually does. Radar warning systems are commonly installed on military aircraft. Their primary purpose is to detect the upper-level radio frequencies employed by ground- and airborne-based active (i.e. radiation-emitting) ...


4

Maybe not technically a fighter, but the A-1 Skyraider was (in different variants, like the F-4) also used by all services. It was even used in air to air combat, shooting down at least one North Korean and one Chinese aircraft during the Korean war and several North Vietnamese MiGs during the Vietnam war. Not sure if that makes it a fighter according to ...


4

Can the pilot in the front seat control the weaponry as well, or do they only fly the aircraft? Yes, the pilot in the front could control all weapons. And can the weapons officer in the back fly in emergencies, like, pilot is unconscious or something? This is more complicated. The USAF F-4's did not have controls for the RIO's (now called WSO's), but ...


3

(Charles Bretana's answer provides direct evidence. This answer adds historical context.) Other fighters use differential elevator to cause roll, F/A-18, F-100, F-15, but not F-4: F-4 pilots were trained to use the rudder to roll the aircraft at higher AOA. Instructors were trained to emphasize this flight characteristic, and, whenever at high AOA, to keep ...


3

The backseater in the Navy/Marine Phantoms had no way to fly the aircraft. The Air Force Phantoms could be flown from the rear seat. No insult to the Navy, but the guy in the back on USAF Phantoms was far better trained in flying than his Navy counterpart. It wasn't neglect on the Navy's part, but where it recruited it's rear seat people. Most were ...


2

The FJ Fury is actually a Navy/Marine derivative of the Air Force F-86 Sabre. Variants of the Northrup F-5 were also used by all services, although mostly in adversary training roles. The A-7 was used by the Navy and Air Force, but I don't think the Marines ever flew them (fighter?). And going back further, and in the non-fighter category, the B-24 had a ...


1

There is no "Flap Pump" or "Gear pump". There is a hydraulic system on the F4 though. All those systems need hydraulic power. They run on hydraulics.


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