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23

This would be possible with other fighter jets that are of similar design to the F-15, i.e. have a low aspect ratio, much of their lift produced close to the centerline, and a lot of control authority. They would also need the other two key ingredients for a landing of this kind: a strong aviator at the controls and a bit of luck. Specific contributing ...


21

The aircraft you are mentioning are completely different from each other and some of them are not even named according to the US Tri service Naming System. In general, the aircraft retain their original designation given even though the later versions have little in common with their predecessors. The F 15 was a direct result of the studies that followed ...


14

Short answer: By not flying faster than the 104 did and adhering to the lessons learned. Flutter first started to cause crashes in WW I when improved engine power and aerodynamics made a substantial rise in flight speed possible. Every time technological advance allowed higher speeds, flutter became an issue which was then solved both by trial and error ...


10

Aerodynamic heating will damage or destroy the composite wing of the F-22, especially around the leading edge where compression heating is highest. See here for the temperatures which supersonic flight causes. Therefore, the F-22 has been restricted to Mach 1.8 for short duration and Mach 1.6 for prolonged flight. More speed will not be needed, anyway. The ...


10

The XF-104 is a prototype aircraft, which lead to the F-104 starfighter. Usually, during the development of an aircraft, flutter testing is carried out and corrective actions are taken. The Wikipedia article you liked has a point: Production aircraft would also feature a redesigned fin structure using stainless steel spars to eliminate the flutter problem....


7

The F-15A and F-15B came along first, and they were pure air-to-air. (The B model is two-seat so an instructor or observer could ride along.) Then the F-15C and F-15D were built, also as pure air-to-air platforms. (Again, the D model has the back seat while the C is single-seat.) Then they got the idea for the "E" model, which has the second seat for the ...


7

First off, "F/A" is a non-standard designation under the tri-service designation system. "FA" or "AF" would be standard; the second letter would, according to the system, be the "primary mission" of the aircraft, whichever of those the top brass felt the design was better at. The Hornet would probably have been designated "FA" as its primary goal was to ...


6

It is a speed brake (air brake). Here is a closeup of it. Image from aero-cafe.com It is usually used reducing speed landing (approach). It is also used for other functions- to slow down quickly at high speeds and to prevent too much speed buildup in a dive. This image shows it being used during approach. "F-15A 21st TFW landing with extended speed brake ...


6

The F-15 wingtip is a "raked" tip configuration, which increases lift and decreases drag.1 []2 This is the design decided by the USAF after discovery of several design deficiencies during initial flight test which included aeroelastic deficiencies (wing bending) and aerodynamic effects (buffeting). "In early June 1974, the Air Force flew the “raked” tip ...


5

It is definitely possible to lose an entire wing and still control the plane if the plane is capable of knife-edge flight. Check out these videos of it being done-- ending in amazingly successful landings -- with radio-controlled planes. Of course a full scale-plane being flown in this matter would impact the ground with much more energy in relation to the ...


5

It's an air brake, also called a speedbrake. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_brake_(aeronautics) Another view of an F-15 landing with the speed brake open: Source: Wikipedia, click to embiggen


4

As @RalphJ notes, it is not required. It is a design choice based on various considerations. The 'cone' in the Su-35 houses the RWR and the drogue chute. In case of F-15, however, the drogue chute is not used and the RWR antennae are located elsewhere (in the wing and vertical tail tips, to be exact). The image below from a BAE systems document shows the ...


1

Aileron: +/- 20 degs Horz. tail: 26 deg up, 15 deg down Rudder: +/- 30 degs See: https://www.nasa.gov/centers/dryden/pdf/87906main_H-1073.pdf


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