Hot answers tagged

21

Doesn't look like it was any 'tactical' reason- rather it was used to get a cool shot, which is totally OK with me. From rulit.me: While setting up for a filming pass, the camera crew had difficulty spotting the gray F-14 against the mountainous background. Over the radio, Rat asked the pilot to blip the fuel dump switch and make a mini-cloud. The ...


16

This is the line for dumping fuel in an emergency. If the F-14 needs to land quickly but is too heavy for landing, fuel can be pumped overboard through this pipe. To the left of it is an antenna, and the rod below the fuselage is the arrestor hook. The Australian F-111s use the same arrangement to great effect during flight displays. From the F-14 Walk-...


15

MiG-23 For the MiG-23, it was manual. [The] MiG-23 had a completely manual wing sweep control. But there was no gauge to indicate optimum wing position for the surrounding conditions. "You had to manually put the wings into position to safely fly the airplane," (...) "They had a very nice gauge that showed where the wings were commanded to, ...


14

Most decidedly not, at least not for the first fly-by-wire fighter in the NATO arsenal, the F-16. Its stick, in initial block versions, did not move at all, instead using piezoelectric load cells to detect stick pressure. This caused some issues with novice Viper drivers overreacting to the stiffness of the controls compared to anything they had flown and ...


10

https://siregar3d.com/category/grumman-f-14-wip/page/3/ Above is a 3D modelling of the nose landing gear (NLG) well looking forward. The tiny wheel during retraction would slide forward to aft on the curved guide rail I circled, so the launch bar can be stowed with its tip near the top of the NLG. Otherwise there would be no space for it with it vertical (...


10

Probably not. One manufacturer of "Active Control" joysticks, as used in F-35 training simulators says Because the active control stick is controlled by a computer almost any characteristic can be programmed. Typical and useful characteristics include: Multi modal feel characteristics - the ability to completely change the stick feel when moving ...


6

During the plane’s heyday, the US Navy maintained 26 active duty F-14 squadrons for the 12 carriers certified for F-14 operations, 4 Test and Evaluation squadrons, 2 Fleet Replacement squadrons and 4 Naval Reserve squadrons. 632 F-14s were delivered to the US Navy between 1973 and 1994. Each Forrestal-, Kitty Hawk-, Enterprise-, Kennedy-, and Nimitz-Class ...


6

The Energy Maneuverability theory is primarily a conceptual design framework. Its role is to be a guideline in creating the requirements for your aircraft. This is something well above the manufacturer's level of responsibility. The requirements are created by the buyer, like the US DoD; the manufacturer's job is to design a machine to meet them, with some ...


6

The probe on the nose isn't a pitot tube (although it might looks like one). That's an AoA sensor as explained here: Home of M.A.T.S. - Sensor Probes Reported from the link above: Angle-of-Attack Nose Probe: The Angle-of-Attack (AOA) is an essential dimension since it measures the angle between the aircraft's vertical flight direction and the vertical ...


5

The post above comments on the F-16 originally having an immobile control stick, and that it had been modified in later versions to be more similar to a video game. As a professional video game developer who has actually been in a late-model F-16 simulator, I can tell you that it feels nothing like a video game stick, and it feels a bit like pushing on an ...


4

The only thing I can add here, is that the two square holes on the underside next to the tail hook, are for the chaff and flares.


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