6

The first issue with airplanes is they are stupendously, freakishly light. Any random American freight diesel locomotive weighs more than a 747-400. Trains rely on this mass to provide the downforce to keep them engaged to the railhead. So your vehicle would need to do something to replace this downforce; for instance have a tubular or I-beam rail which ...


6

I can't provide a definite yes or no, but I can discuss some of the FARs that will need to be considered. In most cases you have to consider three groups of FARs; covering aircraft, aircrew, and operations. For the aircraft, they have to have an airworthiness certificate. The Kodiak is certificated, but you have to address operating without the cargo door (...


5

Putting vertical surfaces at the front is pretty much trying to make the plane fly backwards in the yaw axis. Remember that it is just a weathervane. It will want to switch ends same as a weathervane would if you reverse it to the wind direction and let it go. If you tried to fly a plane configured like that, you'd crash as soon as you got airborne, unless ...


5

That is a complicated process. You need: A positive mold (mandrel) for the canopy. A negative mold for the canopy frame. For a single prototype you can also use the unfinished fuselage itself. A fuselage mold with a molded window sill. First the fuselage positive mold core is built. From that the negative mold is taken, but also a negative mold only for ...


4

Yes First, we should clarify the fact that a "rocket engine" is a variant of a jet engine. A rocket engine is usually understood as a jet engine that requires external supply of all components of combustion, including the oxidizer. In a way, that makes things easier, and this is why rocket engines were commonly used at the early stages of jet ...


3

Would it even work properly? Depends on your definition of "properly". Would it steer the aircraft like a tail one would? In principle yes. Would it be as easy to use as a tail one? Not by a long shot. Putting the vertical fin in the front will not make it act as a stabilizer any longer: any small deviation in sideslip angle will get amplified by ...


2

Ground effect is measured using the non-dimensional height parameter 'h/c', i.e. the height above ground divided by the chord length. By increasing the chord length, the height of the maximum efficiency height is raised, as the location of the h/c does not change. Increasing the span also adds efficient lift due to aspect ratio effects, however creating too ...


1

I would start by contacting the ARTCC in whose airspace you would want to do this. Their Airspace and Procedures office should be able to assist, and get you in contact with the right people. They can also help, in the event that you get approval, with planning the airspace to use for the flight. We used to do extensive airspace reservations for military ...


1

From 'Flying' magazine, July 1962.


1

This is such an interesting question. I myself was thinking of adding triple microjets on both wings, for redundancy. To add @Robert-DiGiovanni's good answer, the balance seems to be the tricky one. I'm thinking aloud here. Now, the plane must be able to be lift at the ends of both wings with Full tanks, Empty Tanks and ballast Full throttle, Empty Throttle ...


1

This particular idea has been abandoned for several reasons. Tip-jets that put engines on the tips themselves - "hot" tip-jet, unlike "cold" tip-jet where a central turbine sends compressed air through the blades to be ejected at the tip - cause lots of drag, in addition to being very noisy. While the noise problem may have been lessened ...


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