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First of all, both of these systems are continuous flow fuel injection systems, therefore they do not inject fuel directly into the cylinders. Since the fuel is flowing continuously from the injector nozzles, the spray is directed into the induction system just before the intake valve. That way, the fuel will only enter the cylinder when the intake air ...


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18 HP is more than good enough. Wright Brd's proves it. Your plane seems perfect. However, %35-40 of the propulsion will be lost as "fuselage drag", where your HP's are valuable . If you can split the power into two, like that in the "Colombon Cri Cri". (You can do it with proper Gates belt drive), you can use lighter props (0,7m) and nacalle drag loss ...


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To oversimplify, you could say it's because when you are rich of peak you are getting temperature reduction from too much fuel. When lean of peak you are getting temperature reduction from too much air. Watch this guy's youtube video seminars. They are a treasure.


60

I think there's a mix-up in the labeling of the photo. Here's the photo and caption from a copy of "Ignition" that I just downloaded: Here's the photo and caption from the next page: Seen together, those two photos and captions make sense. Somebody mixed up the images and the captions in the copy you are reading.


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The MD-80 series has two systems that can increase thrust in case an engine fails during takeoff: Automatic Reserve Thrust (ART) This system is independent of the throttle position and can increase the thrust of the remaining engine to the maximum rated thrust in case of an engine failure. It can be turned off with a switch on the glareshield, because it ...


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Assume cruising at 4,000 ft, throttled to about 20 inches MP and 2,000 rpm. Now reducing the rpm to 1,200 without changing anything else will cause the MP to rise sharply. The ambient pressure hasn’t changed, the throttle plate hasn’t changed. The only thing that has changed is the speed at which the pistons are pumping the air. Since they are moving much ...


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The concept of a launch system combining an airbreathing 1st stage and a nonairbreathing 2nd stage is as old as the X-1 rocket plane carried aloft by a modified B-29 bomber, and carries on a tradition which includes the B-52/X-15 pair and today's Virgin Knight/SpaceShip 2. This approach has the advantage of weight savings for these reasons: Less ...


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