New answers tagged

2

Light aircraft manufacturers typically use 75% power as a normal cruising power. There is really no set reason for this 75% figure. It is just a convenient convention that most light aircraft manufacturers use. Part of the reason for this is that a normally aspirated (non-turbocharged) piston engine can only produce 100% rated power at sea level on a ...


2

No. Let's assume sea level operation. At 75% power, the engine is burning only 75% of its maximum fuel flow rate, and the remaining 25% of the engine capacity is "off line"- but available at any time by pushing the propeller speed control up to full fine pitch (for a plane with a constant-speed prop) or by opening the throttle all the way (in a ...


3

The tendency is to mount the engines as close to centerline as possible. This mitigates control problems in engine out situations and keeps the wing structure as light as possible: if engines were far from the centerline, the structure of the wing would need to be stronger and thus heavier, and should either/one of the engines fail, the running engine(s) ...


2

Listed under Benefits on the Wiki page link edited into your question: The benefit of this setup is increased specific impulse over that of a rocket. For the same carried mass of propellant as a rocket motor, the overall output of the air turborocket is much higher.Emphasis added Since most "jet fighters" use jet engines (or low-bypass turbo fans)...


Top 50 recent answers are included