45

It depends on the type of situation. If the aircraft is unable to land for some reason, we'll want to know the remaining fuel to get an idea of how long the aircraft can realistically stay airborne. For an aircraft coming in for an emergency landing - as you have already guessed - the reason we ask for remaining fuel is because the fire and rescue personel ...


34

I work as a fixed-wing pilot for a hospital-based Air Ambulance program. Let me add my experience to the ATC orders accurately cited by Pondlife's answer: the MEDEVAC call sign (the old "Lifeguard" is still used when filing the flight plan) indicates a need for priority handling. ATC is often helpful in providing us with priority routing. This includes ...


28

(Airbus) A320 landing gear approach paths. It's important to approach the landing gear from the right angle, because an explosion could throw deadly debris at the firefighters. Cooling According to Airbus, water-mist is to be used to cool the brakes. Water, CO2, or foam, are not to be used. All those cause sudden cooling that can lead to wheel cracks or rim ...


21

There are specific protocols that procedurally are required to be followed. Insofar as brake inspection is concerned, it would have been obvious from the trucks that there was no brake fire. It's also obvious that there's not a major amount of smoke coming from the brakes. As they approached the landing gear, they would have smelled serious brake heating. ...


20

The variety of callsigns used for medical flights are covered in the AIM 4-2-4: b. Air Ambulance Flights. Because of the priority afforded air ambulance flights in the ATC system, extreme discretion is necessary when using the term “MEDEVAC.” It is only intended for those missions of an urgent medical nature and to be utilized only for that portion ...


11

(I'm assuming you're asking about the US, based on your profile.) The FAA's ATC orders section 2-1-4 has a list of aircraft operations that should be given priority, including emergency service flights, but an aircraft in distress always has the highest priority: Provide air traffic control service to aircraft on a “first come, first served” basis as ...


11

In my experience, yes they will hold for emergency related vehicles. I fly out of KPNE often, where a lot of the Philly Police and Emergency choppers are kept. I have been held for their takeoff before. I don't know if this is regulation or simple courtesy but I can assure you it happens. On a similar note, I once spoke to the designer of the Philly ...


11

I'm going to assume you're talking about something like this: Photo liberally stolen from here. As other have mentioned, these are generally connections for a standard aviation headset (headphone and microphone plugs). When plugged in you're typically connected to the cockpit (so the pilots know what's going on), and on commercial airlines you may also be ...


10

The US call sign is "MEDEVAC." It used to be "LIFEGUARD," but was changed in 2012 as part of the transition to ICAO flight plans, which suggests that "MEDEVAC" could be a standard (though I'm not sure if it is).


8

All aircrews have to comply with laws and regulations, unless they have a waiver that makes them exempt for certain regulations. Aerial Fire Fighting need to fly lower than the minimum safety altitude in order to pick up water, so they will have a written permanent waiver to do so. This is similar to ATO's conducting training for student pilots. They can ...


8

The exact procedures will vary locally but typically ATC will give priority to police and ambulance helicopters that operate emergency services. If these helicopters are operating in controlled airspace, communication with ATC will be done by normal VHF radio. There is no need for a dedicated communications person, the pilot will be in contact with ATC. ...


7

The firemen are looking for fire. If a blaze does break out, they will extinguish it. I do not know the protocol for firemen using water to cool the brakes in absence of a visible fire. Also, it looks to me like the firemen are more interested in the right engine than the brakes.


6

Firefighting services still apply foam path, atleast outside US, though the practice is no longer encouraged. FAA, in its 2002 CertAlert 02-04 actively discourages it: The FAA does not recommend the foaming of runways for emergency landings and warns against the practice with any foam other than “Protein” foam.... It is recommended that ARFF personnel ...


6

To answer your questions: The headset allows the steward to talk on the aircraft's common channel which the pilot can connect to any radio frequency. Normally the steward will be talking both the captain and possibly to the tower of the arrival airport. The tower can patch in phone lines. So, if necessary, the tower can telephone a doctor, then patch in the ...


5

Is it legal to build and fly a scale 1m:20cm Boeing C-17 for use in flying from the U.K. [...] Building an aircraft is likely not regulated (intellectual property laws still apply), it's probably like building a car in your garage, however using an aircraft, specially outside your own property is regulated. Drone use, in UK, is regulated by CAA as for any ...


5

Theoretically the diameter of the rotor plus some room for the tail is sufficient. If it fits, it fits. Practically, a bit of room for manoeuvring is required. Also special attention to the generated turbulence is needed in cramped spaces. Regulatory I don't know the exact size required for the EC135 operated as air ambulance in the Netherlands. But I do ...


5

I don't think there's a hard and fast rule for this, but it depends on a number of factors: Wind/ Weather conditions requiring safety margins. Effect of nearby objects/structures. If they are big I think they might cause unpredictable wind effects, again requiring compensation and space. (source: flugzeug-bild.de) That said, I'm no helicopter pilot, so ...


5

Also there is a plug mounted on the wheel so if the brakes heat up the plug melts, so that the tire will not burst. This would be something they would also check.


4

The tires are getting hot because of the huge amount of kinetic energy absorbed by the brakes. They also get a bit of heat from being used (friction from landing) but that's not very big: you can design a tire to take that: after all, your car tires don't get that hot from being driven on. The brake assemblies act as heat sinks for the kinetic energy ...


4

I just found an AIC (POLICY FOR THE APPLICATION OF CALLSIGNS TO HELICOPTER EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICE FLIGHTS) of relevance. HEMS flights are prioritised by ATC: The Flight Category is a priority status allocated to a flight by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) designed for use with tactical handling by ATC. There are 7 categories of flight as defined ...


3

No, law enforcement and fire department aircraft have to comply with all of the same safety guidelines that regular aircraft do. If this had taken place at a controlled airport, the crew would most likely be disciplined, but since it was outside of an airport and no damage or injury occurred, it's likely nothing will happen. What they did was reckless, but ...


3

"Helimed" is the most common callsign for U.K. air ambulances, e.g. Helimed 42. When not on an emergency call or when returning to base, they would use an abbreviated callsign, e.g. Hotel Mike 42. They also usually operate as Special VFR flights, meaning they can fly using instruments and ATC vectors if required and they will be in touch with ATC at all ...


3

I little off base, but when I flew air ambulances in Southern Louisiana, where helicopter traffic is extremely heavy because of oil field and offshore use, I used the personal call sign "Savior 6" as a personal moniker. I was an RN and Paramedic. Helicopter call signs were known to be Aircare and Acadian Ambulance's AIRMED.


3

In Boston, where I live, medivacs use custom call signs that they pick for themselves. Medflight uses the generic "Med One", "Med Two", "Med Three". "Lifeflight" that is run by the University of Massachusetts uses "Lifeflight" as their callsign. Northern Massachusetts is covered by the Dartmouth Hitchcock Advanced Response Team. They use "DHART".


2

Yes, it potentially could, its a common air show stunt, but would it, most likely not. There was a similar scenario where the gear failed in a similar way and the plane was simply landed delicately on the bad gear. There were lots of sparks but everyone was ok. Ultimately its not worth the risk of the truck driver (should the gear crush them) aircraft ...


2

Smaller planes can pull it off, here is video from a weekend airshow somewhere. http://digg.com/video/plane-lands-on-truck Bigger planes, that's a lot weight. Even my Cessna Cardinal (4 passenger) could weigh close to 2500 lbs landing, basically a whole nother car on top of a truck. Maybe a car carrier would be good, longer landing ramp, clear front to fly ...


2

Sorry unfamiliar with FAA regs, but since Canada's regs are often just rewrites of US or ICAO rules: In Canada, I cannot find any direct reference to airstairs as required minimum firefighting equipment : Canadian Aviation Regulations (SOR/96-433) section 303.09 there is however a requirement for holding an airport certificate in Canada requiring a safety ...


1

I think for airliners it is perhaps borderline possible but highly impractical. Lets assume a 737 and google around the internet for some rough figures. A 737 apparently lands at 155 knots which translates to around 180 miles per hour and has a max landing weight of about 65 tonnes. Apparent 4-20% of that can be on the nose gear. So that is up to 13 tonnes ...


1

It depends on the regulations of the (target) country. In general, UK CAA requires permissions for operating non-commercial drones for operating in its territory. These can be either ad hoc or permanent approval: If you want to use a small unmanned aircraft or drone outside of the operating limits set out in the Air Navigation Order then you will need ...


1

In the USA wild land fires are covered by "temporary flight restrictions" which restrict access by general aviation. Fire related flights set transponder code 1255 so ATC can identify them. This is to avoid midair collisions. As for altitude, in the USA over sparsely populated areas and open water there is no low altitude restriction other than staying 500 ...


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