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4

I flew to Libya under humanitarian support in 2013 when there was a civil war going. We flew with the technician to operate cargo doors and one cabin crew to support us. We were carrying a cargo of medicine and food with Airbus A320. It may not be the complete answer of yours but we followed a special procedure as; Malta control was the closest and working ...


2

No ordinary commercial flight will land at an airport in a disaster zone as you describe. However, it isn't impossible, and special crews trained in disaster relief operations do it all the time. First of all, ATC is not required. All pilots are trained in landing at uncontrolled (aka pilot-controlled) fields, which comprise the vast majority of airports. ...


6

In the U.S. at least, HADR doesn't launch aircraft until a crisis aka disaster has been identified, even if at launch they don't yet know if the problem is lack of potable water or civil unrest over rigged elections. An already flying commercial airliner won't have a glut of doctors and medicine unless it's been chartered for an already identified crisis, ...


5

Keep pushing hard on the wheel brakes... And hope those do work, obviously. If there's soggy ground next to the runway, let the aircraft roll onto that and the wheels should bog down into the mud. There's precious little else you can do unless you want to deliberate drive the aircraft into something solid.


0

"Is it dangerous to do a skidding turn to lose altitude without increasing airspeed" This is a great question as it underscores the importance of approaching at around 1.3 times stall speed. Also, of critical importance, is your instructor did NOT request a skidding turn, what was requested was a forward slip, although I admit this may have taken me by ...


4

During a nose-down spin, adding power can tend to make the spin go flat in some aircraft. Yet in some cases, adding power can aid spin recovery, especially in a flat spin. As aside, I've had a radio-controlled model airplane that would enter a really nice flat spin, and would consistently recover if I gave it lots of power and kept the controls neutralized....


7

Applying engine power can indeed help to end a spin. But the added thrust will make an overspeed in the ensuing spin recovery much more likely. Also, applying asymmetric thrust on the wrong side will flatten and stabilize a spin. These are the main reasons why the engine should be idle in spin recoveries. Remember the Boeing 307? The first passenger ...


7

Several issues: Gyro precession induces pitch effects that may help or hinder depending on the direction of rotation P factor, which may help or hinder depending on the direction of rotation. Propeller wash may tend to help unstall the wing root a bit, but the rotational force is coming from the unstalled wing driving forward and the stalled wing at ...


3

I fly a low-wing, 4 engine turboprop. We would shut down the engines by cutting off fuel, but not feather the props prior to hitting the ground. There are several reasons for this. 1) The fire will go out in the engine, reducing the potential for fire. 2) The RPM of the prop and engine will be drastically reduced, for us it will probably drop to about ...


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