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1

In this case, the passenger landed a two-seater with the help of flying instructors based at the airport. During this incident, ATC phoned a type-rated pilot and relayed instructions. The passenger did have 150 hours on spamcans but hadn't flown for years and never a turboprop When her husband collapsed, the wife of a pilot was talked down by another ...


2

If by Flight Control Room you mean Air Traffic Control, not very likely. Simulators are operated by flight instructors. They will role play ATC for the “pilot” being instructed. So of course, they know the aircraft intimately. There is no requirement for ATC personnel to even have a pilot certificate. If they do have a pilot certificate, they will not be ...


4

The answer depends a lot on the type of plane being flow. While plenty of air traffic controllers are also pilots on the side, it is highly unlikely that anyone on duty at the time would happen to have a type rating in a large complex turbine aircraft, and/or enough knowledge to talk through checklists. They may be able to offer very generic advice such as ...


6

There is a pushbutton on the overhead panel in the hydraulics section to manually deploy the RAT: 5 RAT MAN ON pb The flight crew may extend the RAT at any time by pressing the RAT MAN ON pushbutton. Note: The RAT extends automatically if AC BUS 1 and AC BUS 2 are lost. (refer to 1.24.20). (A320 FCOM - Hydraulics - Controls and Indicators) ...


3

You would certainly prefer to have flaps available in order to reduce landing speed. If so, the pilot in command has discretion whether using flaps is appropriate to the situation. Unfortunately, the loss of all engines may prevent flaps from being deployable. In two of the most famous airline no-engine landings I can think of, the Gimli Glider and Air ...


6

That would be up to the discretion of the flight crew, what forced landing site they selected, approach route, etc. Typically deployment of flaps in a forced landing scenario will only be done once the airplane is guaranteed to make the landing site by gliding in that landing configuration.


12

Flaps steepen the descent angle - in other words, you run the risk of falling short of the runway. So in a glide you keep the flaps up until you can be certain of making the landing point. Once the landing is guaranteed, you can then deploy gear as well as flap to slow down as much as possible - being aware that these actions will further reduce the gliding ...


6

Looking at the report, the airplane does not appear to be certified for CatIII in the first place (it would have to have Head Up Guidance and not that many do - the CRJs are the same) so the QRH doesn't need to mention an approach category that the airplane can't do anyway. As far as CatII goes, the approach with no pitch trim is going to have to be flown ...


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