35

They are called vortilons. They can induce a vortex to the upper surface of the wing at high angles of attack, which allows flying at higher angles of attack before stalling. Additionally, four vortilons were installed on the lower surface leading edge of the outboard wing panel. Their interaction with the wing sidewash at high angles of attack produce ...


13

They are Vortilons, a type of vortex generator. The placement of the vortilon low on the leading edge limits its vortex generation to high angles of attack (where the air meeting it is going over the top of the wing), and at low angles of attack, it's just a little fin sticking out, not creating too much drag (but not none). They are used to improve aileron ...


12

Now, DC is easier to produce than AC and easily to inverted to AC To produce AC of a specific frequency, you will need one of below An engine that rotates at a fixed rate. A variable transmission box that normalizes the rotation rate. Produce DC somehow then invert it to AC. Method #1 is used by most American GE diesel locomotives. As a result, when the ...


8

How they were invented As @Bianfable wrote: They were first used on the Douglas DC-9. On the Douglas quad-jet DC-8, leading-edge slots are used, compared to the Krueger flaps used by Boeing for its 707:[1] A DC-8 door-operated slot next to an engine pylon (diecastaircraftforum.com) When Douglas put those slots on the DC-9 (tail-mounted engines) during ...


3

Vastly easier to synchronize 2+ generators With DC generators (or AC alternators immediately rectified to DC)... each generator simply has its own voltage regulator set to output the agreed DC voltage. The regulator, which is simple, well-established tech, simply increases/decreases the generator excitation field to get the correct voltage to come out. It ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible