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19

This is a loaded question. Every regulation in aviation seems to be written blood and the need for runway safety areas (RSA) is no exception. RSAs are defined in AC 150/5300-13A Runway Safety Area (RSA). A defined surface surrounding the runway prepared or suitable for reducing the risk of damage to aircraft in the event of an undershoot, overshoot, or ...


10

will the plane's momentum carry it on to the main part of the runway unharmed? An aircraft landing on the EMAS must not suffer control problems. According to an EMASMAX document FAA Advisory Circular (AC) 150/5220-22A ... No adverse aircraft affects in the event of short landing ... The referenced document doesn't state this but does say ...


9

You'll probably sink in (and have a bad day.) The longer answer is that it depends on how you land. Force from a touchdown on a runway can vary from nearly zero (in an extremely light landing) all the way up to twice the weight of the aircraft or more (in a hard landing.) While it's theoretically possible to land an airplane very lightly on the runway, ...


5

I will try to answer as much of this as I can, but there may be some holes to fill: Is RSA/EMAS designed for impact loading at the point of touchdown and to absorb energy of the moving aircraft for deceleration? No, the arresting materials is only there for a runway overrun condition. It is not designed to absorb an aircraft impact, nor is it designed ...


5

There is a link in the FAA tweet you link to, you should probably read it. EMASMAX® is the latest, most durable version of ESCO’s EMAS, developed with and technically accepted by the FAA. EMASMAX arrestor beds are composed of blocks of lightweight, crushable cellular cement material designed to safely stop airplanes that overshoot runways. - FAA Fact ...


4

I can think of a couple reasons why you might not want to expand EMAS all around the edges of the runway. One is simply cost vs benefit: If it is more likely that an airplane will run off the end of the runway than the edges it would make more sense to put the material there. EMAS would seem most beneficial in stopping forward speed if the wheels were ...


1

I can think of two general reasons not to place EMAS all around the runway. First, it would massively increase the amount of space required for a runway. Some airports might have that space to spare, others might not. Second, it would cost a lot of extra money. Maybe there are studies on this but even if the money's available, would it be most useful to ...


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