16

Two reasons: It is way faster and allows one person with a relatively cheap-to-run R-22 to do the work of several cowboys. You're paying for the cowboy 24-7 if they are on staff, which is usually the case on a sprawling and remote ranch/station where you have to keep them on full time (and the horse if using them); you're only paying for the machine (...


6

Lifespan of a Level D simulator is: as long as the maintenance costs are justified. Image source Maintenance costs of a simulator is according a typical bathtub curve, with the right side of the curve forever climbing up and up. Like with operating and maintaining an old-timer car, as long as spare parts can be purchased it is only a matter of justifying the ...


6

As long as it's maintained, and replacement parts are available, there is no limit. Although maintenance could end up costing more than the simulator itself: CAE says the Series 5000 will offer a 25% reduction in lifecycle costs, which tend to be two to three times the original cost of the simulator during a 20-year lifetime (...) — flightglobal.com, 2008 ...


5

I work for an airline. Normally it takes no less than 6 month from the GO to maiden flight. It depends on many factors, but simplified, it goes like this: When Commercial teams look for new opportunities, they prepares a "business case" balancing the profitability of the route and costs. Main board evaluates the proposal and gives the GO. It is ...


3

I’ll address your second question first. I'm fundamentally confused about the distinction between fixed and variable costs. Simply put, variable costs are ones that go away if you cancel a flight (or, more likely, a pair of out-and-back flights) while fixed costs are ones you still have to pay. A challenge is that many “fixed” costs are actually step-...


3

Aside from the economy of scale effect of a large aircraft vs a small one you can compare apples for apples by looking at the same type used on both roles. The Canadair CRJ200 was sold as both a regional airliner and a corporate jet, called the Challenger 850, so it makes a good comparative example. The Challenger 850, being, mechanically, a CRJ200 with a ...


1

Personally, I don't see how it's financially viable in most situations, but I'm guessing it's financially viable in a few situations or when shorthanded. Although horses are expensive to "maintain", almost every ranch already has them. Feed and medical are the two largest expenses, and you're going to be providing that whether or not you are using ...


1

The fixed cost problem with the hub and spoke model is mainly due to the need for banked flights to minimize average connection times. Ideally, every plane starts the morning at a spoke and arrives at the hub at roughly the same time. Then passengers have an hour or two to change planes, and all the planes fly back to their spokes. This cycle is repeated ...


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