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I'm afraid the license is not international. Each country has their own governing rules regarding qualification for Private Pilot Licenses. Prior to traveling and assuming you will be allowed to fly in the country you plan to travel, I'd get ahold of the home country's Aviation Administration and request what their qualifying tests and licenses require. Hope ...


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As a US citizen you can own an N-reg aircraft directly, regardless of where you live. The regulations on aircraft registration are in 14 CFR Part 47. They say who can register an N-reg aircraft, but they don't say anything about where that person must be. 47.3(a)(1) simply says: §47.3 Registration required. (a) An aircraft may be registered under 49 U.S.C....


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No, as a US citizen you do not need to jump through any hoops to register an N-reg aircraft in your name, anywhere in the world. It doesn't matter where you live. I used to own an N-reg aircraft when I lived in Germany. It was registered to my German address. When I moved back to the US and brought it with me I submitted a change of address, and that was the ...


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According to NBAA, trusts are used by non-US citizens to register aircraft with the FAA. Because you are a US citizen, it looks like you don't need a trust to maintain the FAA registration. Here's the article with references to the FARs: https://nbaa.org/flight-department-administration/aircraft-registration-transactions/owner-trusts/ . Here's an aviation ...


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I can't find any equivalent definition for what the FAA defines as a complex aircraft for the purposes of endorsements. EASA defines a complex aircraft completely differently. “‘complex motor-powered aircraft’ shall mean: (i) an aeroplane: with a maximum certificated take-off mass exceeding 5700 kg, or certificated for a maximum passenger seating ...


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