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This EASA document Easy Access Rules for Medical Requirements explains what the Specific Medical Examination (SIC - Medical Certificate Limitation Code) is and how it applies to medical qualifications for pilots/crewmembers). An explanation of what it means is found in the EASA document referenced above on page 52, item 8: (8) SIC Specific regular medical ...


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For an applicant failing the Ishihara test, the next step is a medical assessor. If they're deemed "colour safe" (defined below), they can get Class 1 medical. In your case, presumably, you were not deemed colour safe since you're daytime-only Class 2, if that's indeed the case, then unfortunately Class 1 will not be possible according to the EASA ...


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There are several different tests for color blindness. Ishihara plates are the cheapest but notorious for poor accuracy: if you don’t pass (and many people don’t), that isn’t really a failure; it just means you need a more accurate test. What other tests are acceptable likely varies by country, but if you can tell red and green traffic lights apart (by color,...


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To start with the same disclaimer, I don't have any documentation on this, but as far as I recall, there are glasses available that enhance the ability to tell the difference between red and green by means of filters and those are valid for driving a car in night traffic. Again, a test will have to prove your ability to work with them, but if you pass that ...


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Note: I don't have any links or documentation for this. This is just what an instructor at my flight school said, so take it with a grain of salt. The only reason a pilot would need color vision is because towers use a red/green/white light gun to communicate with planes that have lost their radio. So, you need to have just enough color vision to be able to ...


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Since June 2011. EASA first proposed a change to CS 25.1322 in NPA 2009-12 (Notice of Proposed Amendment) in November 2009: CS-25 contains a certification specification (CS 25.1322) that dictates the colour of warning, caution, advisory, and other message lights that are installed as annunciation displays in the flight deck. As presently written, CS 25.1322 ...


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In the United States, air rights, especially with sUAS operation still remain vague and case law concerning them is not fully decided. The most succinct ruling that I know of in the subject is United States v Causby, 328 U.S. 256 (1946). Here the Supreme Court struck down the Heaven and Hell Doctrine, stating that navigable airspace over the United States ...


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The FAA doesn't require it, but some carburettor manufacturers may have them. You can get return springs for Rotax engines, but only for non-certified aircraft and then again only to prevent throttle creep


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