14

That's an artefact of a different era. Before computers were used to create documentation, updating large documents was difficult and expensive. People tried to reduce the workload by using chapter-page numbering. When you have to add pages to a book, chapter-page numbering allows you to replace one chapter instead of having to reprint the whole book. Some ...


12

The entire sky and all airports are divided into ATC areas of responsibility. Whenever a flight moves from one area of responsibility to another, the pilot needs to change frequency to talk to the next controller. A flight can only be under the control of one single ATC unit at any one time, which usually equates to being on one single radio frequency. When ...


10

The ICAO doesn't issue licenses, so there's no such thing as an ICAO license. You have a license issues by the Argentine aviation authorities is ICAO compliant, which means it is recognized internationally, and you can fly Argentine registered airplanes anywhere in the world. It does not automatically give you privileges to fly airplanes of any other ...


9

As for the EU, EASA has published SIB 2016-09 which states that: (emphasis mine) CAT.OP.MPA.210 of Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 stipulates that flight crew members required to be on duty in the flight crew compartment shall remain at the assigned station, unless absence is necessary for the performance of duties in connection with the operations or for ...


8

Yes, there are. Everything is regulated in Germany. Your regular experimental aircraft would have to follow JAR 23 and the LBA has transferred the supervision and certification of experimental aircraft to the Oskar Ursinus Vereinigung (OUV). Before you begin work on your experimental, be sure to contact them and talk to an OUV assessor. This assessor will ...


8

In the US, the FAA's requirements for obtaining authorization to fly former ,military aircraft is included in 8900.1 Volume 5, Chapter 9, Section 2. It is quite lengthy and covers more than just former military aircraft. As others have pointed out, most of these aircraft do not have a Type Certificate. They normally have a Special Airworthiness ...


6

Separation minima in Europe are pretty much identical to the rest of the world, since almost all countries base their aviation regulations on ICAO recommendations. To summarize: The minimum vertical separation is 1000 ft. In theory, above FL290, the minimum is 2000 ft, but since all European countries have implemented reduced vertical separation minima (...


5

First, you're reading the EASA table wrong. Type A approaches are not all the green rows, they're the vertical column that says "Type A, 2D or 3D" that covers all the specific column of all the green rows and the blue also. On the right side of that column, you see Type B approaches, divided to subcategories. All of those being 3D approaches. Second, the ...


5

Yes, it is possible. But, not in the sense that you are thinking. As GdD has pointed out, ICAO does not issue certificate nor register aircraft. Individual governing authorities of sovereign states do that. An ICAO certificate is a certificate compliant with ICAO standards. ICAO will recognize it. But, another governing body does not have to necessarily ...


5

I am unable to find any ETOPS restrictions for private aircraft in the FAA FAR/AIM Part 91. The FAA Advisory Circular AC 91-70B is applicable for commercial aircraft operators. Anecdotally, general Aviation single-engine aircraft (Including helicopters) make oceanic journeys on a regular basis.


4

Quite simply, you’d need a private pilot license and a type rating. Other posted answers are overly complicated and many rules mentioned relate to the aircraft (where and how the aircraft can be flown) and not the requirements for the pilot Further, there is no requirement to be instrument rated. Insurance of the aircraft is between you and a private ...


3

EASA Regulations do not specifically preclude you from doing what you are planning to. They leave an awful lot of room for interpretation. How you do your maintenance is up to you, as long as you meet the core requirements and that your processes can be audited. Additional rules for this type of activity would normally covered by a local procedure (such as ...


3

The controller will request the pilot changes frequency either when the controller is ready for them to do so: G-ABCD, Contact Anytown Control 123.000 Or, they can request change at a particular moment, for example: G-ABCD, at Waypoint Contact Anytown Control 123.000 or G-ABCD, when passing FL100 contact Anytown Control 123.00 That's it really - ...


3

The class D airspace you are referring to is a control zone (CTR). According to article 24 of Regulation for Remotely Piloted Aerial Vehicles, the following applies to VLOS operations (emphasis mine): Except as required by point 6 below, RPAS operations shall not be conducted: a) within ATZ and beneath take-off and landing paths or at a distance less than ...


3

The answer, broadly is no, handheld GPS units can not be used for IFR RNAV routes (or approaches for that matter). To know if a specific GPS unit is legal for IFR navigation you need to check up on a variety of paperwork, thats covered in this answer. Strictly speaking if you could find a certified unit it would be legal but there are no current units (to my ...


3

No, larger aircraft typically don't have such speeds shown on the ASI because they vary significantly with weight. See also Why don't Transport Category aircraft have a listed Vy?. For the Dash-8 Q400 for example, the $V_{\text{y}_\text{SE}}$ speed is called $V_\text{CLIMB}$: VCLIMB – Single-engine best rate-of-climb speed. The following table shows ...


3

Nope. Not unless your employer refuses to continue training. Legally all that’s required is that you have accomplished all the training required to meet the prerequisites per §61.39 and meet the practical test requirements per §61.43 plus meet the eligibility requirements for the grade of pilot certificate you are applying for per §61.103, §61.123, or §61....


2

The „handbook“ for ATCOs in Germany (!) is the MO-ATS (Manual of Operations for Air Traffic Services) which is an internal DFS (Deutsche Flugsicherung - the German ANSP) document and therefore not available to public. However it is based on the German AIP and ICAO DOC 4444 which are both available to public. For the international legislation check Milo ...


2

There is nothing like a "handbook" for ATC procedures and phraseology for use by personnel providing ATC services in EU states. There is a civil aviation authority (CAA) in each country of the EU. EASA (EU AVIATION SAFETY AGENCY) provides its own regulations for flying in EU airspace. The EU standards are "regulated or guided" by ICAO documents and annexes. ...


2

In the United States, under the FAA’s pilot certification rules, per Part 61, you would need a minimum of: A Private Pilot Certificate with: Airplane Single Engine Land or Airplane Multi Engine Land, depending on the aircraft you intended to fly. A type rating on that airplane, if the airplane has a gross weight exceeding 12,500lbs or is turbojet powered, ...


2

Partial answer: Is the backwards compatibility seamless and simultaneous? Yes. Able to reply to both mode S and mode 3 interrogators in real time? Yes. Or a toggle switch between modes, in which when mode S is selected mode 3 interrogations will be ignored? No - a Mode S transponder will respond to interrogations by a "pure" mode 3 interrogator. ...


2

In IFR flight the ATC controller will not tell the pilot to change frequencies until he has coordinated with the next sector. The next controller must check for conflicts before he can accept a new aircraft to his sector. More and more this is done through Controller–pilot data link communications (CPDL) text messaging and no radio call is needed to tell ...


1

I don't know much about EASA regulations, but this seems to be a reference to Part FCL.025(c)(1): (1) The successful completion of the theoretical knowledge examinations will be valid: [...] (ii) for the issue of a commercial pilot licence, instrument rating (IR) or en route instrument rating (EIR), for a period of 36 months; (iii) the periods ...


1

Goodness, the best not guess, since the amount of information an ATPL candidate must master is just massive. Could be anything from the smallest detail to broad concepts. Anything to make you uncomfortable and see if you are willing to admit that you might not yet know everything, or whether are you the kind of guy who takes the best guess and hopes it's the ...


1

The Competency Based Instrument Rating (CBIR) allows you to gain an IR in less hours than the "full" course, by either crediting previous experience or licenses. I held a UK issued IR(R) (old IMC rating), which meant that I had approx 60 hours IFR time when starting my IR. A full IR would have meant 45 hours training, whereas the CBIR allowed me to do just ...


1

You will most likely need a Supplemental Type Certificate from EASA According to their FAQ, emphasis mine: My aircraft has been modified in the USA by Form 337 action. Can EASA accept this? Answer EASA accepts alterations on non-critical components that are substantiated via Form 337, as detailed in the EASA-FAA Technical Implementation ...


1

1) If you are under training in a single pilot aircraft (e.g. C172), it is logged as dual in single pilot. If you are under training in a multi pilot aircraft (e.g. A320), it is logged as dual in multi pilot. 2) Correct. 3) If dual (under training), the PIC name should always be the name of your instructor. The only time you use SELF is if you were PIC, ...


1

This was just published in CAP1855 from the CAA a few days ago, which may answer your question: Instrument Rating validity, revalidation and renewal for aeroplanes and helicopters To revalidate, you must hold a valid relevant class or type rating, unless the IR revalidation is combined with the renewal of the relevant class or type rating; no “empty” IR to ...


1

I was wondering about the same and here is what I found. Yes, for LAPL license holders, when switching to another airplane within the same class rating (don't mix it up with type rating) the familiarization training shall be performed and signed off by instructor. It's stated in the "FCL.135.A LAPL(A) — Extension of privileges to another class or ...


1

If you asked about the regulation my answer would be FAR25 25.1301 and 25.1309 for large aircraft software. DO-178C is recommended as a means of compliance by AC20-115D. Software review and approval guidline can refere to FAA Order8110.49 A and EASA CM-CEHSW-002.


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