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34

There could be a lot of reasons for this... EU closed airspace to 737's MAX 8's on March 12 They needed to go into a holding pattern until ATC figured out where to put them They needed to be in the holding pattern until they could get a landing slot They were redirected to an airport that had a maintenance facility that the airline uses They redirected to ...


14

It has nothing to do with LVP, but with the fact that there are standard routes at Schiphol to the main piers; From the AIP AD 2.1 (EHAM) section 2.1: Aircraft shall comply with the standard taxi routings to and from the stands as depicted on AD 2.EHAM-GMC. Deviations from the standard taxi routings will be given timely to the pilot by Schiphol Ground. ...


14

This is just because of the way EASA treated B737 MAX grounding. They just stopped accepting flights with these aircraft into the EU airspace even for already airborne flights with valid flight plans. For this company two flights were involved. On from Cape Verde ended up in Tunisia and one from Dubai in Ankara. Both of them were originally hoping to get ...


11

Within Europe, whenever there is need to reduce the number of flights through a certain airspace, the Network Manager (Eurocontrol) puts in a so called "regulation". This results in flights planned through the regulated airspace being delayed or re-routed. Regulations are given an ID; those starting with KALP are from the Karlsruhe Upper Area Control (EDUU),...


9

Short answer: for visual approaches, it is not yet set in EASA regulations, but a draft recommends that the landing clearance be issued somewhere from downwind to short final (dashed line in the diagram below). The relevant distance I found only applies to radar approaches: 8.9.6.1.7 Clearance to land or any alternative clearance received from the ...


8

Yes, there are. Everything is regulated in Germany. Your regular experimental aircraft would have to follow JAR 23 and the LBA has transferred the supervision and certification of experimental aircraft to the Oskar Ursinus Vereinigung (OUV). Before you begin work on your experimental, be sure to contact them and talk to an OUV assessor. This assessor will ...


7

Let's assume you started exactly with ICAO minimum fuel required (as explained in What are the ICAO fuel reserve requirements?): Taxi fuel Let's assume you used all of it at your departure airport. Trip fuel Used for the flight to the destination airport. Contingency fuel Let's assume this was used in a holding pattern at the destination. Alternate fuel ...


6

Separation minima in Europe are pretty much identical to the rest of the world, since almost all countries base their aviation regulations on ICAO recommendations. To summarize: The minimum vertical separation is 1000 ft. In theory, above FL290, the minimum is 2000 ft, but since all European countries have implemented reduced vertical separation minima (...


4

This depends on your jurisdiction a bit since the nuances vary from country to country but in general to get paid to fly (or get paid enough to break even) you need to have at least a commercial pilots license. This would allow you to get paid to fly. With a CPL you can do lots of things like: Tow banners Fly charters Fly cargo Fly sight seeing flights ...


4

As a practical matter, it will probably be too much hassle to get signed up with new flight schools in each city/country you visit for only one or two lessons, especially in the US where you need certain classes of visa (no VWP), permission from DHS, etc. Also, FAA and ICAO/EASA rules can be pretty different. If you know one well, you can fairly easily ...


4

EASA has published an easy access version of the Standardised European Rules of the Air (SERA) here. To answer your question, see: SERA.5005(f) Visual flight rules (presuming you are asking about VFR flights): (f) Except when necessary for take-off or landing, or except by permission from the competent authority, a VFR flight shall not be flown: (1) ...


4

In Europe this is regulated by SERA.5005 Visual flight rules (source, emphasis mine): (f) Except when necessary for take-off or landing, or except by permission from the competent authority, a VFR flight shall not be flown: (1) over the congested areas of cities, towns or settlements or over an open-air assembly of persons at a height less than 300 m ...


4

For general aviation no certification is required, neither is certification required for at least some commercial operations like flight training, at least for the regulatory bodies I'm familiar with (FAA and EASA). I've seen Ram and Garmin mounts being used on some smaller passenger and cargo operations as well, usually GPS and tablets in older prop ...


4

For Commercial Pilots: 250 hours; For ATP: 1500 hours. Source: ecaa.gov.et (PDF; see Sections 3 and 6). The flight hours requirement does not seem to be different for Pilot and Co-pilot. (See Section 6.6)


3

The class D airspace you are referring to is a control zone (CTR). According to article 24 of Regulation for Remotely Piloted Aerial Vehicles, the following applies to VLOS operations (emphasis mine): Except as required by point 6 below, RPAS operations shall not be conducted: a) within ATZ and beneath take-off and landing paths or at a ...


3

The answer, broadly is no, handheld GPS units can not be used for IFR RNAV routes (or approaches for that matter). To know if a specific GPS unit is legal for IFR navigation you need to check up on a variety of paperwork, thats covered in this answer. Strictly speaking if you could find a certified unit it would be legal but there are no current units (to my ...


2

I believe it is very unfortunate that Asperger syndrome has been included on the autism spectrum even if labeled "High Functioning…. " I have personally worked with numerous Aspergers clients. They are capable of doing anything anyone else can do. Their weakness in understanding nuanced speech patterns, and weakness in understanding people's true intent, Etc ...


2

There is no evidence that EASA refused Smart Wings QS 1201 to enter EU airspace. The EASA AD does not make any statement about airborne aircraft. Stopping operation mid-air is no option, and a last minute diversion does not contribute to the safety of the passengers. It is more plausible that the airline had a hard time to decide what to do with this flight,...


2

Since the question is about Hungary, the answer will be in Hungary's AIP. ENR 1.2 says: 2.6. VFR flights in level cruising flight, when operated above 3 500 FT (1 050 M) MSL, shall be conducted at a level appropriate to the track specified in the table of cruising levels (ENR 1.7 para 3.). (Emphasis mine.) And by referencing that table (PDF) in ENR 1.7,...


2

you actually have two questions here ...for primary flight planning EFB's with up to date charts are legal for planning and reference as covered in this question. Many EFB's (well at least foreflight that I know of) here in the US allow you to file flight plans, and receive briefs from a weather briefer right in the system. ...and navigation ...


1

This was just published in CAP1855 from the CAA a few days ago, which may answer your question: Instrument Rating validity, revalidation and renewal for aeroplanes and helicopters To revalidate, you must hold a valid relevant class or type rating, unless the IR revalidation is combined with the renewal of the relevant class or type rating; no “empty” ...


1

Unless I am reading the document incorrectly, EASA and the FAA have a reciprocity agreement since 2011 recognizing each other's findings and approvals. That means an FAA STC approval is good in EASA countries (except the ones that are not EU members) and vice-versa.


1

This is an answer based on experience, if someone knows corresponding regulations or if I’m writing something not 100% correct, feel free to edit it. First of all: It’s possible to switch flight schools between countries (what I did). But regarding doing it while traveling: it depends on which countries and the flight schools. In Germany for example you ...


1

The approach clearance (be it VFR or IFR) has a clearance limit until over the threshold. So, you cannot cross the landing runway threshold unless you have received landing clearance. Approach clearance always includes clearance to fly the missed approach procedure.


1

The direction of the ground track is what matters, not the actual aircraft heading.


1

I am not sure about EASA regulations but in the US you can log PIC time whenever you are the sole manipulator of the controls and properly rated to fly the aircraft. In the US there is a distinction between the legal PIC (person legally responsible for the flight) and PIC time which is the person actually flying the airplane. Since the plane is certified ...


1

Calculators are not allowed during examination. Therefore all calculations should be feasible without a calculator. Where a question involves calculations not feasible without a calculator, such as root 10, then the question should specify the approximate value of root 10 I found the answer on page 7 of this pdf.


1

Assuming you mean a temporary Permit to Fly (rather than a 'permanent' one) for an aircraft normally flying under a C of A, then this site states that: You will be required to supply a validity period while completing the application. Temporary permits are usually issued for less than a month, but you should allow enough time for the flight to ...


1

EASA OPS 1.255, appendix 1, 1.4 b). I don't have the text in English here, sorry.


1

I discovered that it's probably better to do the medical in the UK as the country of issue of your licenses has to be the same as the country of issue of your medical. This way, I avoid the conversion.


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