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51

Aircraft Maintenance Engineer here. To evaluate if an aircraft is safe to fly we use three main reference documents: 1. MEL (minimum equipment list). This document contains the list of elements that are allowed to be inoperative. For example a pneumatic valve, a computer, a seat, etc... All unserviceable elements will have to be fixed within a ...


41

Generally speaking a pilot can (physically) do whatever they want: ATC doesn't have a remote control. If you push the throttles forward and pull back on the yoke you will take off, no matter what mean things the folks in the tower are shouting at you over the radio. Practically speaking doing so can get you into trouble: You may be met in the air by planes ...


22

Yes, a pilot-in-command may take off at his own discretion if absolutely necessary in the interest of safety. Rules of the Air (ICAO Annex 2) apply: 2.3.1 Responsibility of pilot-in-command The pilot-in-command of an aircraft shall, whether manipulating the controls or not, be responsible for the operation of the aircraft in ...


14

It depends on the airline and their planning capacity. The simple answer is that they can't be sure of the tail number "of record" for a flight until the plane pulls into the gate at its destination. It's rare for a plane that departs the gate for a flight to not run that flight (it's pretty bad business for it to be common for flights to depart the gate and ...


12

The other answer goes over the MEL/CDL/SRM, but I'll address your specific questions: Is it okay to fly with that? (I assume you are talking about the gear door, not the tire) That depends, specifically in this instance I doubt that there would be any issue flying with that small amount of damage considering it is on a gear door on the bottom of the ...


12

According to FAA §25.1535 Appendix K, The airplane flight manual must contain the following information applicable to the ETOPS type design approval: (b) Required markings or placards. (e) This statement: “The type-design reliability and performance of this airplane-engine combination has been evaluated under 14 CFR 25.1535 and found suitable ...


11

The A320 saw entry into service on 18 April 1988 with Air France. About a year later Flight International covered the dispatch topic. For British Airways – whose initial acquisition of the A320 was through the British Caledonian takeover, and not an order – the problems weren't with the plane, but with the Boeing culture that had to adapt. Otherwise there ...


10

The flight plan contains the requested cruise flight level, as well as step climbs or level changes along the route in the route field. Example 1: (Image Source: skybrary.aero) Example 2: SAM UN621 BASIK/N0412F330 UZ150 BADUR/N0426F340 UN472 ARE/N0424F350 UN864 PIMOS Fxxx being the requested flight level.


10

Different airlines may have different policies, but I think what my airline uses is probably pretty standard in this regard: no, you can continue at FL 390. The limitation of not exceeding FL 250 on one pack comes from the MEL, which is a pre-takeoff document. If the pack is known to be inoperative before takeoff, then the flight has to be planned at an ...


9

No, ATC does not handle these flights differently from regularly scheduled ops ATC isn't concerned with why an airplane wants to go to an airport or whether they regularly operate there or even if there are ground services available for them at the destination. Whether the flight is regularly scheduled or not may fall under different regulations but ATC ...


8

Because the Top of Descent (TOD) is calculated in flight based on current weather data, STAR/Transition assigned, directs received during the cruise portion of the flight, vectors received taking you off your planned route, etc.. The FMC does the calculation for you with higher precision in flight. For regular ops, ATC can use the rule of thumb 10.000ft / ...


8

Have you ever been waiting for your flight at an airport and noticed that big roll of paper being printed up at the counter? That is called the "Flight Release". That roll of paper has all the information that the pilots need to fly their flight. It has their fuel, their route, the weather information, probable payload, and everything else they need. A ...


7

How far ahead they formulate their plan will vary for each airline, but plans can change even as late as hours or even minutes before the flight, in case of things like broken planes or inoperative equipment that makes a swap necessary. Say an aircraft that was going to operate a couple of long-haul flights & overnight at an out-station develops a ...


7

Probably not very likely. In 1978 Soviet Union asked US\$100,000 (\$375,200 today) for "caretaking passengers" after their interceptors forced to land KAL 902 on the frozen lake (has never been paid). However firing the two R-60 missiles from interceptors into the airliner was for free.


6

This would probably be better suited for English, as it's a phrase that really has nothing to do specifically with aviation. However... Having dotted your "I"s and crossed your "T's means that you've paid attention to all the details, that you've finished everything that needs to be done, the job is complete. An uncrossed "T" could be a capital "I" or a ...


6

(Source) Whether the FMS is capable or not of calculating the V-speeds, it should be checked and may be overridden. It is because the airplane database wouldn't know if there's a temporary crane that will affect the climb limit weight, or if 400 ft of the runway are unusable due to maintenance, for example. In other words, 10,000' corrected-length runways ...


6

You can calculate ToD beforehand or let the FMS do the work. In reality though, you generally don't get to wait until your optimal ToD to start descending, especially flying into busy airports. If the airport has arrival routes, you'll be flying one and there will be crossing restrictions that are either part of the arrival clearance or expected clearances ...


6

ETOPS aircraft usually will have an indication on the front nose gear doors like this picture. I believe that an indication is given in the cockpit also on some type of aircraft info placard but I have no image to back this up. I am certain that the airlines dispatch computer system will have some sort of tag as to whether an aircraft is ETOPS rated.


6

Exemption 3585 is an exemption to 14 CFR 121 dispatch requirements for weather originally requested by Peoples Express. Lots of airlines have requested similar approval, and here is an example on regulations.gov for Air Transportation International. The exemption that they asked and were approved for was: ...an exemption from §§ 121.613, 121.619(a), and ...


5

Yes, and it is a regulatory requirement that it is so. §121.99 Communications facilities—domestic and flag operations. (a) Each certificate holder conducting domestic or flag operations must show that a two-way communication system, or other means of communication approved by the FAA certificate holding district office, is available over the entire ...


5

Essentially, dispatcher: Prepares flight plans and briefings. This includes adjusting the route according to the weather to e.g. take advantage of the winds, reserving slots with network manager (in the areas that have one) and collecting all data pilots will need like weight and fuel estimates. Handles disruptions. When a flight can't depart as scheduled ...


4

The ATC Flightplan (FPL) does not directly contain the optimum cruise levels for a flight. These levels are calculated and printed in the Operational Flightplan (OFP). The FPL does contain the requested cruising levels for the flight along its planned route. The requested flight levels (RFL) in the FPL will often be quite close to the optimum cruising ...


4

I'm not aware of any official resources which present all that information in a concise way, but to get a general idea of the operation of a modern civil passenger aircraft you can refer to the manuals provided with flight simulation add-ons. As opposed to the standard aircraft contained in most flight simulators, these payware models are very accurate and ...


3

Flight plan aside (if you are going VFR) here in the US you identify your make/type when hailing the tower. For example if you enter the Delta Airspace around an airport your hail may be Northeast tower; Piper N347G4 At 3000 with information Mike requesting clearance to land. In this case the tower will know you are a piper and may (if available) ...


3

Yes sometimes, because with most aircraft you can't fill all of the seats and all of the fuel tanks and stay under max gross weight, meaning the airplane can't achieve its potential maximum range with a full cabin and on long range city pairs some sort of passenger/fuel horse trading may have to go on. So on flights where the airplane needs more range ...


3

The answer depends entirely on the country the aircraft is overflying when an intercept is ordered or requested. I can't imagine payment being demanded by an EU country if the intercept is performed due to a bonafide emergency, or simply out of an excess of caution. However, I know of countries where airport staff will deliberately leave airport runway ...


2

No, the regulation only concerns dispatching and taking off. Fuel burn will usually vary a little bit based on unpredicted wind shifts, performance variations and traffic deviations. § 121.639 Fuel supply: All domestic operations. No person may dispatch or take off an airplane unless it has enough fuel - (a) To fly to the airport to which it ...


2

Exemption 17347 was requested by the Regional Airline Association to extend a pre-existing alternate weather regulatory exemption to apply to regional airlines operating under part 121 because the FAA has changed the language referring to other carriers used in grants of exemption. As a separate issue, when A4A previously petitioned for this exemption, ...


2

I imagine that the do receive plenty of training and I belive there was a time where they were "Flight Service Specialists" (this may have changed when LM took over). The FAA offers a great free course through their WINGS program on Flight Briefings and how they work on the other side (from the briefers stand point). I attended it recently and I recall that ...


1

Using EUROCONTROLs „business-to-business web services“ you can file and manage flight Plans (including IFPS validation) as well as check details about the filed flights e.g. departure and arrival messages or where the aircraft is currently. After a registration (you have to proof you are eligible to use the service) you do not need any ATFM connection at ...


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