New answers tagged

2

The other answers all seem good, but I think are not complete. And Isay that with the utmost respect for the others who replied, most of whom are without doubt much more experienced pilots than me. First point, and perhaps was mentioned, but when you are touching down, you do in fact intentionally stall the plane, or at least in small prop planes. I only ...


4

Yes - and practical enough it could save your life. Spinning - which is a certain type of stall - was invariably fatal in the early days of flying, with 90% of fatal accidents attributed to this cause. One of the first recoveries from a fully-developed spin was Lt Wilfred Parke RN in 1912 in an Avro G. It was written up for Flight magazine, and the manoeuvre ...


16

You don’t need a new technique You don’t normally stall jetliners. And in a crisis the last thing you want to do is learn a new technique. Besides, they already have a trained practice for descending jetliners very quickly. It’s used for loss of cabin pressure. While the procedure normally levels at 10,000’/3000m, it could certainly be extended. Anyway, ...


13

It is smarter to roll onto your side and maintain unstalled flight, executing a emergency spiral descent. G loads on the wings are much lower as there is no need to maintain altitude, only to control airspeed. With all due respect to our beloved Langewiesche, "mushing glide" technique is for much lower wing loaded gliders that are easily unstalled ...


39

It isn't practical for a number of reasons: Intentional stalls are inherently dangerous. Stall-spin accidents are a major cause of accidents, stall recognition and recovery are taught specifically to avoid stalls. Some airplanes have docile stall characteristics, but even those can still bite you. A Cessna 172 will drop a wing if mishandled, especially ...


19

Normally, a stall and controlled flight are mutually exclusive. That AF447 would descend as it did has to do with the relaxed static stability of the A330 and its rear cg location as well as the docile behavior of its airfoils with large separation on the upper side. In short: With some aircraft this is indeed possible and practical but with others it is ...


0

In JO 7110.65, 4−2−5. ROUTE OR ALTITUDE AMENDMENTS. b. When route or altitude in a previously issued clearance is amended, restate all applicable altitude restrictions. The example given: “Amend altitude. Cross Ollis intersection at or above Three Thousand; cross Gordonsville V−O−R at or above One Two Thousand; maintain Flight Level Two Four Zero.” (...


1

The restriction to cross "BHAWK at FL240" is overridden by the controllers latest clearance to "Descend Via FYTTE5 arrival", unless they include the instruction descend via "EXCEPT MAINTAIN FL240". FAA Climb Via/Descend Via Speed Clearances Frequently Asked Questions, page 6, questions 8. If unsure, you should query ATC though....


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