33

Every country handles aircraft registration differently (but generally similar). Im sure Boeing could tell you who they originally delivered the airframe to but if it was sold from there it could legally go anywhere and would only be subject to local registration legislation. Here in the US you can look up aircraft owners by N number but not all countries ...


20

No, you were not nearly involved in an accident. If the flight crew is ready to go, an Airbus A320 takes about 40-50 seconds from the moment take-off clearance is given until lift-off. As soon as the aircraft is off the runway, the next one can land. On some busy airports, 60 seconds between take-off clearance and the next landing is a daily occurrence. ...


18

LiveATC.net has live and recorded ATC radio for most countries/airports. There are lots of flight tracking websites, e.g. FlightAware, that have live and recorded radar/ADS-B tracks. You'll have to correlate the two yourself.


17

The FAA publishes the NASR database. This is an official, authoritative data set that covers all airports, airways, routes and navigation aids under FAA jurisdiction. The data files are not human-readable though and require special software to display. Other civil aviation authorities in other countries have similar products. Some are available for free, ...


16

It isn't just one thing, but a vicious cycle: Airline travel is expensive. One person flying and one person driving end up about the same price once you figure in gas and hotels, but the airline will want that same price for each passenger, while you can fit up to three more people in the same car at practically no additional charge (the extra weight will ...


15

It will vary widely from aircraft to aircraft, but I will try to give some general estimates. Time on the Ground Part of what you are referring to what is sometimes called aircraft turn time. It's not really directly related to my calculations for your overall question (though it is certainly a factor for short-haul jets), but in this article, minimum turn ...


15

Looking into one set of data from the the popular Flightradar24 service it is not visible. I think I found the data you're looking at. Since the heading also suddenly changed to (exactly) 360, I'm thinking this is just an invalid data point. Notice that the receiving station jumped between these measurements and something could have happened with the ...


11

Nice question. There are several ways how to get these information. http://www.fallingrain.com/: free to use, no registration needed. World database of the airports and waypoints. From these information you could easily make DB for waypoints. EUROCONTROL EAD (https://www.ead.eurocontrol.int/eadcms/eadsite/index.php.html): free to use, registration needed. ...


11

There's certainly some missing details in that story. Two minutes with Google shows that (a) the prefix "TF" refers to Iceland, and (b) those three aircraft were most recently registered to Air Atlanta Icelandic, some sort of charter/cargo operator. What's missing from that news story is that surely the Malaysian authorities have already done the above, ...


10

The article in the Guardian said that they think they know who the owner is on paper, but that company isn't contactable. Taking out advertisements in major newspapers (within the same jurisdiction, then covered as news by the world's press) is likely to be a step towards giving due notice before reposessions proceedings can start, to give the real owner ...


10

I had three days to burn so I took a look.) Comparative data was very difficult to find beyond accident counts, so determining relative safety is problematic. No one that I could find tracks or estimates the number of flights/hours for gliders, even the Soaring Society of America, so this is all interesting but essentially meaningless. Even if such data ...


9

Your air traffic controller's metric doesn't mean anything to most people. Here is what actually happened as measured by passengers carried, and it looks nothing like your graph. The 911 attacks in the US caused a blip after 2000, and the world financial crisis caused another after 2008, but passenger growth has been growing exponentially since deregulation ...


9

Short and direct answer ATC centers have no public websites in general. Aeronautical and ATC information is distributed by a fixed dedicated network, the aeronautical fixed service (AFS) and its data network AFTN. From NAT Doc 007: The agreed OTS is promulgated by means of the NAT Track Message via the AFTN to all interested addressees. A typical ...


8

I use the National Flight Data Center at http://nfdc.faa.gov I had to write them a letter explaining why I wanted the data (http://fplan.sf.net) and they provided me with a login. Now, every 56 days, they send me an email telling me there's an update available. Bad news: they recently switched from a flat file to some unbelievably convoluted xml format ...


7

My first thought was: Abbott-Doenhoff. They wrote a book with lots of measurement data, and you can find it here. Of course, this was all long ago, but public data for the airfoils of today's airliners are not published. A lot of data is also freely available in old NACA and NASA reports, however, you need to know what data you want to search for it ...


7

This guy has a 365 day history online. You could contact him for older values. You can also get some history using Archive.org.


7

People travel by air for mainly two reasons, and both require money: business pleasure Since the source of that chart is FAA, my answer is mostly related to USA, but it can generalized globally. Economy Years leading to 2000, there was an economic boom. Air travel was increasing. By 2000-2001 (before 9/11), dot-com collapse resulted in a recession. This ...


7

You can find a lot of information about aircraft in their Type Certificate Data Sheet that is available from the FAA or other certificating authorities. The FAA's is located here. It takes a bit of time to find certain things, and other things aren't included like range, or sometimes dimensions.


7

The [relevant] dimensions of the cargo compartments are published by the manufacturers. For all Airbus planes, visit: Airbus / Airport and Maintenance Planning. You can also search for other manufacturers. For the requested number of containers, here they are for the A330-300/900 (no need for the volume as the containers are standardized): The documents ...


7

(Guessing the) Runway Selection For spotting airplanes, you want to know which are the current active runways. The runway history of planes or flights shouldn't matter much, unless your plane of interest is limited in what runways it can use. Large airports have many parallel runways. In general, outsiders will not have enough information at hand to ...


7

I'm a PPL student and I use two sources: LiveATC.net web site for getting used to live communication on my local airport and also for analyzing recorded communication during my training flights. VASAviation YouTube channel, which contains many videos capturing communication during aviation incidents, including charts and subtitles.


6

According to this thread, pretty much anything with scheduled air service will have an IATA code to facilitate booking. From looking at the FAA data, it looks like everything with more than 10,000 enplanements (enplanement=1 passenger boards an aircraft) is considered a "primary" airport, and they all have an IATA code unless the airport is strictly general ...


6

It is no problem to have the same call sign on the same day. As long as the same call sign is not uses at the same time there is no problem. For VFR flights, the same call sign can even be used at the same time as long as it is not in the same airspace. Many of the ADS-B duplicated call signs on a single are aircraft registrations coded in the ...


6

It depends on whether it should be reliable enough to be used operationally. If yes, I don’t know one and would to the best of my knowledge advise spending some sort of money. If no, maybe openflights.org could help?


6

As off today (March 21st), Aviation Herald lists 26 rejected take-offs, in 2018. It's 110 days since the start of the year. So that's 110/365ths, or 0.31 of the year. So, the whole year will have 26/0.31, or about 84 rejected or aborted take-offs. This assumes, all are reported in Aviation Herald, which is probably not true, so the real average number is ...


6

The NTSB will investigate every aircraft accident in the US, and any that foreign authorities delegate to them. As you found, there thousands of accidents ever year. Most of these are not fatal. The NTSB will at least gather the factual information and do their best to arrive at a probable cause. With limited resources, the NTSB must decide which accidents ...


5

One possible source is Skyvector You can use it like a paper map using the Latitude and Longitude markings to find waypoints (or other positions). E.g. What waypoints and routes are near S30°0.00' E112°00.00' Hints: Click "World Hi", use your mouse's scroll-wheel to zoom, play with "Layers". There are also sites with lists, by region, of waypoints with ...


5

Jane's All The World's Aircraft It's not free (Amazon lists it for between \$500 and \$1,000 USD) and it's not machine-readable, but yes, the data is out there.


5

It appears that Flightaware does have an API (both SOAP and REST) that would satisfy your needs. Here is the documentation, see "arrived", "departed", "en route", and "scheduled". Here's a code example from that page that gets data on flights en route to JFK and KSMO (this fits your arrivals criteria no?): That said, you'll probably want to experiment ...


5

I am currently developing a plugin for virtual airlines to pull live data, and I use the FlightAware's API which is really good in my opinion. With a little bit of php magic you can get all the schedules for your airlines for free (if you sign up for the free account) or you can pay to get access to the getAirlineSchedule query which just basically does what ...


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