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18

Yes, a few possibilities... Brake hydraulic and electrical sensor lines located on some landing gear. Putting foreign objects under or between the rotors of brake pads Covering pitot system sensor holes Pressing or hitting the pitot tube (on most airliners you will need a ladder) Letting air or hydraulic fluid out - under inflating tires or cylinders ...


14

This is a valid and good question. The answer is all the different entities will work together to solve the issue. It's called a system wide event, be it a natural disaster or otherwise. [It's an] event that affects a flight and a sufficiently wide area that all alternate routes and airfields briefed during pre-flight preparation have become unavailable. ...


9

No. The aircraft in question do not have ballistic protection, though they do offer system redundancy for battle damage and have to meet certain survivability criteria in live fire tests during development. Just a note: the only armor an A10 carries is a titanium pressure vessel for a cockpit which can take the kind of ballistic punishment you described. ...


6

I can find no record of an F-16 shooting itself down prior to the Dutch incident. There is certainly nothing on the wikipedia page for aircraft shootdowns or anywhere else I can find. However its not the first aircraft to manage the feat. In 1956 a US Navy F-11 Tiger became the first aircraft to shoot itself down, whilst testing its cannons on a test flight....


6

What action need to be taken towards this kind of damage? The aircraft will be grounded immediately and damage like this needs to be repaired in a timely fashion to get the plane back in the air and making money once again. Its worth noting as well (under FAA regulations) that you would also be in breach of § 23.1385 Position light system installation as ...


4

Like anything in aviation, it depends... There are a lot of discussions on the internet about it you can find Here (mooney) Here (cessna) And Here It is a case by case situation and depends on the extent of the hail damage and what/where the damage occurred. In many cases the issue crops up that you can not simply bang the dents out you would need ...


4

There are different degrees of control. The plane could at least be made to crash in a different debris pattern than if the input was not made, and even that's a form of control. As the whether the plane could be controlled enough to land, and do so, as the question states, with all of its control surfaces disabled, let's see. You get considerably pitch ...


4

I expect blade antennas could be damaged with a good blow (or several) from the side. Any number of wire bundles & hydraulic lines in the wheel well could probably be damaged with enough determined yanking on them. Or disconnecting the cannon plugs - although without further damage, that by itself could be reconnected.


3

Most planes fly best without any extra holes, of course! The specific effect of a hole is modifying local airflow, increasing turbulence, and increasing the aircraft's wetted area on the side of the breach. As long as there isn't a matching hole in the back, however, the airflow inside separates (similar to a pickup truck), so most of the airflow is still ...


3

Having a second set of 3-4 wires would need a longer deck. But if one set is damaged, so would this landing area, so we need 2 runways: Doubling the size of the flight deck would result in a massive ship, and scaling doesn't favor something getting too big. Consider the 1967 USS Forrestal fire, even if the deck were to be double the size allowing two ...


2

Yes, you can overheat and damage an F100 or F110 engine just like any other jet engine. It has mechanical and thermal limits that may not be exceeded. And it often happens as part of high performance military flying, though it can make you very unpopular with your crew chiefs and inevitably with you commanding officers if you keep willfully exceeding the ...


2

If you’re talking about multiple landing areas (LAs), the idea has been considered by the Navy; early concepts of the Ford-Class carriers were large catamaran type vessels featuring parallel LAs. But the designs were excessively complex and expensive and not likely to survive to maturation. Laying out additional arresting gear on the angled LA would ...


1

Yes, it can happen. All they'd have to do is pick up some gravel or some other pieces of FOD (Foreign Object Debris) and throw them into the engine intakes. It's probably not going to cause catastrophic damage immediately, but it will significantly increase the maintenance required to keep them operating. I've actually heard a story about this happening ...


1

Shifting the center of gravity by sending people fore or aft was once common practice on large airships to change pitch, taking advantage of a lever arm of several hundred feet. It is theoretically possible to do this on a passenger airliner. Altering the CG with a fixed (frozen) elevator trim will have the effect of speeding up or slowing down the ...


1

Let us consider the longitudinal stability In a longitudinally stable aircraft, any wanted or unwanted increase in angle of attack will cause the pitching moment on the aircraft to change so that the angle of attack decreases. Similarly, a wanted or unwanted decrease in angle of attack will cause the pitching moment to change so that the angle of attack ...


1

I have bought, flew, and sold a couple of hail damaged planes, and adjusted claims on many more. The plane doesn't know it has hail damage and flies as it should. Good prior point regarding structural damage, that would be very bad. Dime to silver dollar size dents are no big deal. The price future sale is a bigger issue. Good luck, flyingadjuster


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