55

Neither technique is "preferable" - the assumption that one is superior to the other is one of the most common false dichotomies (and over-simplifications) in aviation. With some notable exceptions (like the Ercoupe which is incapable of a slip and lands crabbed) a proper crosswind landing should involve elements of both techniques. Crabbing Crabbing ...


30

The relevant TAF that the pilot would have seen before going there is below (only showing the bits for the time of landing): TAF AMD EDDL 180929Z 1809/1912 22025G40KT 9999 SCT035 TEMPO 1809/1813 26035G50KT PROB30 TEMPO 1809/1813 26045G65KT SHRAGS BKN015CB So the pilot was aware of a strong cross wind possiblity, but even 26065KT is 27 kt crosswind (...


24

When dealing with crosswinds and drift, I find the easiest way to understand the concept is to imagine a fast flowing river of water. If you tried to swim straight across a fast river you will end up downstream. You don't "feel" the current. You just keep swimming and the current carries you. Any time you have wind it is like a river of air flowing over ...


21

I might close this one as it’s going to be opinion based. The ‘danger’ of the approach is based upon a number of factors and not just pure numbers collected from an AWOS station on the field and a DEMONSTRATED crosswind component in a Q400 AFM. It also requires factoring in ambient weather conditions in the area, worst case conditions which might be ...


19

The landing gear is indeed designed to cope with crabbed crosswind landings. The recommendation is to avoid crab on landing however in severe crosswind conditions it is sometimes impossible to decrab completely without introducing excessive bank. Therefore some residual crab has to be allowed. Airbus recommends less then 5 degrees of residual crab on ...


18

According to https://www.flightradar24.com/data/flights/ew9203 it landed at 12:13 local time on 18.01.2018, runway 23L or 23R. the METARs for that timeframe say (emphasis mine) 201801181050 METAR EDDL 181050Z 27045KT 9999 SCT037 BKN043 08/00 Q0993 TEMPO 27045G55KT= 201801181120 METAR EDDL 181120Z 27034G48KT 9999 -RA SCT028 BKN038 07/01 Q0995 TEMPO ...


16

Of course yes. Crosswind landings, like the one in the video you linked, are very common. In fact, landings with no wind or only headwind are rare. There are several techniques pilots are taught during their extensive training to land aircraft when there is crosswind. The Wikipedia article I referenced above lists them. Since your question isn't about them,...


16

Based on the provide date, I looked up weather history and the METAR (weather report for pilots) was: CYUL 110700Z 24033G49KT 15SM -SHSN OVC033 M02/M08 A2937 RMK SC8 SLP948 Which translates, in English, to: CYUL weather report at 11th day of the month, 0700 UTC time: Winds at 240 degrees at 33 knots gusting to 49 knots, visibility 15 statue miles, ...


15

The 15kt crosswind for the 182 is not a design limit at all. If it were a design limit, it would be specifically stated in the POH. To be honest, I think there's no such thing as a design limit for crosswind. It all comes down to how much rudder authority there's left at a specific crosswind strength. And even that depends on many factors like approach speed,...


14

The main reason is that you are, in fact, flying straight through the air, and the air is moving sideways. So the plane isn't really being pushed sideways or anything, it's just flying straight through something that is moving... As a simple example, if you are flying north at 150knots (the red line below) and the wind is blowing east at 20 knots (the blue ...


13

Bugs simply make instruments easier to read with a very quick glance. If I need to steer exactly 162 degrees, which is easier? To read where the needle is pointing or just see if the needle is pointing to the bug which I manually set to 162 degrees? The bugs are set by rotating knobs on the gauges. Here, the heading bug knob is in the lower right corner. ...


12

In the US it is required by law to be trained in cross wind landings. For large aircraft that require a type rating... §61.31 Type rating requirements, additional training, and authorization requirements... ...(2) Received a logbook endorsement from an authorized instructor who has found the person proficient in the operation of the aircraft and ...


12

Section 4 of the C152 POH lists the demonstrated crosswind component as 12KIAS. The 150 had a few variants so finding a published number is a bit more tricky. The Aerobat's are sometimes listed as 13KIAS, sometimes 15KIAS - but in general its the same sort of range as the 152(ish!). You will only ever see "demonstrated" next to these numbers, it is not the ...


12

My favoured technique in strong crosswinds, perfected in many hours of glider towing in Super Cubs, Citabrias and Pawnees, is to wheel it on tail high, wing down, and balance it like that until the speed drops enough to lower the tail, then put the tail down and plant it firmly with aft stick. In those conditions it's desirable not to have the wing at high ...


11

A demonstrated crosswind component is highest crosswind (corrected to make it 90°) which has been shown to be possible to safely land by a test pilot. It shall not require exceptional skill by an ordinary pilot, however it does not mean every pilot will be able to do so. It is also NOT a limit (contrary to what some say) - if the pilot does decide to land ...


11

The B777 is limited to a max crosswind component of 25 knots when using Autoland so it is most likely that it was a manual landing in the photo above. The B777 has a "max demonstrated crosswind component" of 38 knots. Some companies will round this up to 40 knots for a company limit. The "max demonstrated crosswind component" is not a limit. It just ...


11

In my opinion it's because of your left of centerline vantage point and the sight picture burned into your brain by the always left side crosswind aspect, and in your particular case the transition to an opposite aspect is confusing your eye/brain/hands-feet processing more than other people. Everybody has their learning quirks. The sight picture you are ...


10

Your question is not easily answered, at least in my opinion, but I'll have a go at it. Your impression that larger airplanes are less sensitive to xwinds than smaller airplanes is correct, very much so in my experience. I lack the expertise to give you the aerodynamic basis, the equations if you will, but I'm fairly certain that saying an aircraft's ...


10

As your source shows, the maximum tail wind is fixed and fairly simple. Getting slightly more complex, there is technically no maximum headwind I'm aware of, although most airports will close when the wind gets much above 50 knots, and even with the wind coming almost straight down the runway, you still get some crosswind component, which factors in. Expect ...


9

One you are established inbound on the VOR radial note the heading you are flying to maintain that course. The difference between that and the radial is your wind correction angle. Multiply it by 3 and apply it to the outbound course heading. To do this you don't need to know anything about the wind. You just need to be able to intercept and track the ...


9

You have two questions here, I hope this is not as trivial as it sounds. Is there a wind gusts threshold based on which, at a given airport, incoming flights are diverted and outgoing ones are delayed? As far as I know there is no specific threshold for which they will divert. You may want to read up on wind shear here as an airport may advise sever ...


9

EDIT: I take your question as "when crabbing the aircraft for landing in strong crosswind, is the auto-thrust precise enough to maintain horizontal alignment with the extended runway centerline?" No. Auto-thrust is not precise nor responsive enough for this capability. Furthermore, auto-thrust is not used in this manner. To track the extended runway ...


8

The problem is you're holding the aircraft with your hand. Imagine a windmill. It has no power at all, it spins freely. What happens when wind is blowing at it? It turns. Now imagine a propeller with no power connected to it, so it acts like a windmill. If wind is blowing at it, it will turn just the same. Why? Because a propeller pushes wind backward when ...


8

Short answer: The reason for crabbing (skewed flight, as you call it) during an approach in crosswind is to keep the wings level while maintaining sideslip-free flight. Flying wings are not fundamentally different, because they, too, have stability characteristics similar to those of conventional aircraft. Airplanes want to be flown without sideslip. Flying ...


8

Should the pilot have even attempted to land? Wasn't it too risky? Ultimately this is the decision of the pilot in command. While airlines have operating procedures (and the pilot can be reprimanded for not following them) the pilot can for any number of reasons attempt a landing, we can spend a lot discussing decision making but my guess is that the pilot ...


8

The general FAA regulation on turbine engines on airliners is § 25.939 § 25.939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be investigated in flight to determine that no adverse characteristics (such as stall, surge, or flameout) are present, to a hazardous degree, during normal and emergency operation ...


8

What do you think will happen if your instructor checks your logbook and sees that you soloed on a day when the crosswind never got below, say 10 kt (a bit more than half again the student limit, but below the school limit, so you might manage to check the airplane out of the hangar)? Even if you "get away with it", those limits were put there for your ...


8

I've seen impassioned arguments for both wheel landings and 3-point landings for taildraggers in crosswinds, depending to some extent on the specific type of aircraft involved. Most arguments favor a wheel landing, but others point out that you will have a vulnerable moment as you are decelerating and the tail is starting to lower to the ground, where your ...


7

Crosswind landings are always uncoordinated. I'm not familiar with big jets, but I believe they simply kick the rudder to align the nose with the runway and let the momentum carry it in the right direction until it touches down, but I might be mistaken here. In a smaller aircraft (like a piston single) you're taught to drop a wing into the wind and ...


7

A slip is uncoordinated flight and this shifts the effective gravity vector you experience. Passengers in the back are also at a disadvantage without a visual horizon in front of them. This can induce a mismatch between what the passengers can see versus what they are physically experiencing. In some people this can cause discomfort and potentially ...


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