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15

Pretty much every FO struggles with this. Technically yes, in the extreme case. If the actions of the capt are about to get everybody killed or otherwise endanger the aircraft, the FO is supposed to have the authority and an obligation, after a suitable verbal interchange, to intervene by saying "I have control" and take over. Generally there needs to be ...


13

Reposition is just what it sounds like, to move a crew from one place to another, generally the move occurs in a plane other than the one they are slated to fly. Both cargo and passenger airlines reposition crews all the time for various reasons. Some but not all reasons are: Crews are not always required to live in the place they are based. Some crew ...


12

Yes, the FO is allowed to take over control from the captain on his own initiative, if the circumstances justify it. One case that I know off where it saved the day was this incident of Lufthansa. On rotation for take-off the aircraft started to roll. Corrections by the captian only aggravated the situation until very quickly the aircraft's wingtip was ...


12

Ground crew are typically employed by a handling agency, which is a company dedicated to performing ground handling of aircraft (exactly the things you describe). Some airports have several different handling agencies. Have you ever noticed, when waiting for your luggage to arrive at an airport, that there are several different help desks to choose from, ...


6

I'm oversimplifying a bit, but more or less the DAL level of a piece of software is decided by asking the question, "What is the worst that could happen if this software fails to operate as designed?" Note that "failure" in this case could mean that it simply stops working, but it could also mean that it does the wrong thing, like pitch up when it should ...


1

To "reposition" is to move from one place to another, but not as a revenue activity. For aircraft, this is sometimes referred to as "ferry". For crews, this is either "deadheading" (flying in a passenger seat) or "jumpseating" (flying in the cockpit jumpseat). Flight crews live all over the world. Some have to "commute" to get to the airports where they're ...


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