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16

A couple of things that get drilled into you in first aid or emergency response training is 'if you aren't part of the solution you're part of the problem', second is 'don't become a casualty.' In other words, don't be a hero. In the scenario you describe there's going to be yelling and screaming from all around, raising your voice isn't going to help the ...


15

I’ve been a passenger on a plane in an emergency depressurization. The first thing to realize is that everything happens amazingly fast. Even as a (GA) pilot myself, it was almost over before I even realized what was happening. The second is that pretty much everyone on the plane grabbed their masks and started putting them on as soon as they dropped, then ...


13

Best thing you can do is remain calm, and let the trained personnel handle the situation. Panic is a state of mind impenetrable to reason, and you being a random person amongst passengers will absolutely not help in communicating with your peers. One of the major reasons for crew wearing uniforms is that it gives them authority. This helps them control the ...


13

Reposition is just what it sounds like, to move a crew from one place to another, generally the move occurs in a plane other than the one they are slated to fly. Both cargo and passenger airlines reposition crews all the time for various reasons. Some but not all reasons are: Crews are not always required to live in the place they are based. Some crew ...


2

I'd say you've answered your question yourself, by listing the various scenario's, any or all of which could be of concern in a particular situation. Handling a diverted flight is a juggle between, safety, time, comfort factor (for crew, for passengers), cost, etc. In turn these are affected by feasibility, location of base (for replacement of crew/airplane),...


2

The Navy did operate some large aircraft, notably the PB4Y-1 Liberator and PB4Y-2 Privateer, variants of the B-24 Liberator. This was a late-war addition, the first being delivered in 1944 with the majority being delivered after the war. It was difficult to find crew compositions - the best bet I had was searching for reports of crashes based off of this ...


1

To "reposition" is to move from one place to another, but not as a revenue activity. For aircraft, this is sometimes referred to as "ferry". For crews, this is either "deadheading" (flying in a passenger seat) or "jumpseating" (flying in the cockpit jumpseat). Flight crews live all over the world. Some have to "commute" to get to the airports where they're ...


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