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12

You cannot convert the CPL to FAA-CPL. What is possible is to obtain a FAA-PPL certificate by verification of the your current foreign license. This certificate will be valid as long as your foreign license is (plus medical conditions, and 24-months PPL flight review required for any PPL in the US). With the PPL certificate, you will be able to obtain IR ...


11

Yes, with a couple of exceptions. FAR 61.123 contains the requirements for a commercial certificate, while 61.153 contains the requirements for an ATP certificate. FAR 61.123(h) states than an applicant must: Hold at least a private pilot certificate issued under this part or meet the requirements of §61.73 FAR 61.73 refers to the option for military ...


10

29 is not too late for them. It might be too late for you, depending on where you are in your life now. First off, a CPL won't cut it to fly for most Part 121 or Part 135 outfits, including major airlines, cargo haulers etc. As of 2013, the requirements to get on the flight deck of a commercial airliner include an ATPL, which requires a minimum of 1500 ...


7

Yes, as per 61.113: (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) through (h) of this section, no person who holds a private pilot certificate may act as pilot in command of an aircraft that is carrying passengers or property for compensation or hire; nor may that person, for compensation or hire, act as pilot in command of an aircraft. A person ...


6

Since you have a CPL, you can receive compensation for flying. Your question and concern is over the means of reimbursement which may have implications beyond that of the FAA. That said, I'm not a lawyer and I would suggest your company consult with one and establish a policy. Most companies I've worked for prohibit personal flying incidental to the ...


6

I would say yes you can as per the FAR as I read them the limitations on a PPL are §61.113 (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) through (h) of this section, no person who holds a private pilot certificate may act as pilot in command of an aircraft that is carrying passengers or property for compensation or hire; nor may that person, for compensation ...


6

You definitely do not need to answer any theoretical questions before beginning flight training in Europe. In fact pop down to your nearest airfield, find a flight school, and chances are they will get you in the air (even for a trial flight) as soon as they are able. Whoever told you that may have been thinking of the examinations you need to pass to get ...


6

You will need to pass the US commercial pilot test to remove the restriction. If you have enough hours, you may want to consider applying for an ATP certificate. A couple of things are required to be completed. Verify the authenticity of your foreign license through the FAA https://www.faa.gov/licenses_certificates/airmen_certification/...


5

According to this interpretation that seems to match your scenario very closely, as long as you're also attending the event then a single trip is fine but multiple trips are not. And you would be acting as a private pilot, not a commercial pilot. The interpretation was about an ATP who ferried fellow club members to an event (in nine flights!) and did ...


5

The regulations on what can be logged for flight time are under 61.51. Sec. 61.51 Pilot logbooks. (j) Aircraft requirements for logging flight time. For a person to log flight time, the time must be acquired in an aircraft that is identified as an aircraft under Sec. 61.5(b), and is--   (1) An aircraft of U.S. registry with either a ...


5

It's just what the regulation says: you must log at least 250 hours of flight time and at least 50 of those hours must be PIC time in airplanes and 10 hours of cross country PIC time in airplanes. As for the other two hundred hours? They can be in any other kind of aircraft you like. It's actually a very common way to build raw hours. A lot of fixed ...


5

First, does someone know where I can get my licences for being an civil pilot in Croatia? I'm afraid nobody here can help you with that: You will need to find a flight instructor or flight school in your area. (Google can probably help you locate candidate schools, and we have some general advice on selecting a school and selecting an instructor that might ...


4

For the European regulations there exist two ways of gaining a CPL: Way A, also called "modular": Before being allowed to start your CPL training, a PPL is mandatory + night flying permission. In total you need 150h of flight time out of your PPL. Way B, also called "integrated": A flight school offering modular courses does not neccessarily be able to ...


4

I'm not a pilot myself, but can provide some links here: Burdens of working as an airline pilot Do pilots make a lot of money? Why is being a commercial pilot stressful? You may also ask on PPRuNe discussion board, which is more suited for this kind of questions that are a lot based on individual opinions. Here is an interesting article from Vanity Fair, ...


3

I'd say you'd be on thin ice with this. The principle is that private pilots cannot be compensated for their flying, with very few exceptions. That doesn't necessarily mean getting paid to fly, it can mean having the expenses of the flight given to you in some way. Say you take 3 friends on a trip, and your friends pay all the costs. You'd be in violation ...


2

Affirmative. That flight will have to be part of the dual training time required for the airman certificate. And, yes, you can do a stopover during the flight; the experience requirement does not prohibit it.


2

Yes. See FAR 119.1. They have a list of other commercial operation you can do with a CPL but not an ATPL.


2

Yes. It counts. One leg needs to be at least 250NM and you have a 280NM leg. §61.129 Aeronautical experience. (4) Ten hours of solo flight time in a single engine airplane (i) One cross-country flight of not less than 300 nautical miles total distance, with landings at a minimum of three points, one of which is a straight-line distance ...


2

i passed my medical exam and it was good, this issue wasn't a big problem at all even its not a problem.


2

Your answer is correct. The pressure distribution from the xfoil simulation on a NACA 0012 are shown below for AOA 0 and AOA 5. As you can see, the lower side pressure does increase. However, most of the lift is generated by the suction on the upper surface, which is typical of subsonic flight.


2

I'm pretty sure you were right. More angle of attack means more lift. More lift is caused by higher pressure under the wing and lower pressure on top. More lift causes more induced drag.


1

It depends. If you go part 61, then absolutely. If you enroll in a part 141 course, then they will have the flight as part of their training course outline and therefore will require an additional completion in sequence with their course unless they have a way to waiver it upon request, but I think they can only credit entire ratings, not single flights.


1

This was just published in CAP1855 from the CAA a few days ago, which may answer your question: Instrument Rating validity, revalidation and renewal for aeroplanes and helicopters To revalidate, you must hold a valid relevant class or type rating, unless the IR revalidation is combined with the renewal of the relevant class or type rating; no “empty” ...


1

I am assuming that you are already a private pilot working on your commercial ticket. There is no requirement to do your solo hours at one flight school. Just make sure your primary instructor knows what you are doing and is OK with it.


1

A simple, but not comprehensive, way of looking at it is: Who supplies the plane? Who supplies the pilot? Not examining all circumstances, if you work for the company, and one of the things they pay you for is flying, that makes things easy. If the company supplies the plane, (whether they own it, lease it, or rent it, with or without your input) that ...


1

Your question didn't give enough information for a 100% correct answer, so I'm going to make a few assumptions: You are asking about FAA certification in the USA You are asking about part 61 training, not part 141, 142, or anything else You're asking about a single-engine commercial rating (this one is less important than the other two) With those ...


1

The answer depends on the reason why you are flying your friend and his employees around. You don’t state whether or not your friend employs you in his company, but from the wording of your question I would guess that is not the case. IF you were employed by your friend, and IF the flight was “only incidental to that business or employment, AND the ...


1

First, this question covers converting an EASA PPL to an FAA one. Based on what you said, I'd strongly suggest getting a full private license rather than a foreign-based one. That will probably require some flight training, which means you'll need TSA approval. Next, when you have the private certificate then you can continue to CPL. In the US an instrument ...


1

According to FCL.610 (IR - Pre-requisites) you need to have a PPL or CPL and a night rating to apply for the IR. If you do not have the IR, the night flying qualification (NFQ) is no requirement to start training for the CPL. According to the AMC appendix 3 of the Notice of proposed Amendment (NPA) No. 2008-17B night flying is part of a training course for ...


1

Citing this similar case, if the pilot shares a common purpose with the friends, there seems to be no issue if it is one flight. Assuming, however, that the pilot planned to attend the race and conducted the flights with this purpose, his bona fide common purpose with his passengers for making the trip would only extend to the first flight to the race ...


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