22

Such design, with hyperbolic leading edges, has been invented by MBDA (Airbus branch for missile systems) represented by BAE Systems (defense contractor), and is described in the European patent 3 599 442 A1 filed on July 2018: The curve helps reducing drag, especially at supersonic velocities, an important factor for missiles and rockets, for which fuel is ...


21

Most likely the adverse yaw effect (due to the induced drag of the increased lift on the down-aileron side) is causing the wing to yaw the opposite direction from the intended roll, and the yaw causes the dihedral induced roll (proverse to the yaw) to override the aileron input. This situation is very commonly seen with very slow flying model aircraft -- ...


18

Flaps and ailerons are weak in bending and have multiple hinges along the span. Also, as you can see in the photo, the flaps are segmented which not only helps to optimize the deflection angle over span but also limits any sideways offset of the hinge points due to bending. Using only glassfiber or aramid fiber for the flaps makes them very flexible so they ...


14

This Flight Safety Training Manual describes them as improving "deep stall" characteristics and C of G range. The stabilons are fixed surfaces that add effective stabilizer area to improve the center of gravity range, and also, by their location, add that additional surface area in a low location that mitigates the tail blanking problem you get ...


13

Technically, F-16 and "similar fighters" have leading edge flaps (LEF) (or droop flaps), rather than slats. The difference is that they don't form a gap between themselves and the main surface when deflected. This makes them usable at high speeds, whereas slats are typically used for low-speed takeoff/landing. For fighters, the most important use ...


13

Technically the B-2 bomber has rudders, they are "drag rudders" (or split rudder) and are located on the outer portion of the wing: Source: Quora The rudders open in a clamshell configuration to create a drag force on the outer part of the wing. Because these are on the outer part of the wing, they can create a significant yaw force.


12

Who says there aren't? MiG Utka (source): High wing, low canard. Sources say it was a pleasure to fly. Focke-Wulf 19 Ente (Ente means the same in German what Utka means in Russian): High wing, high canard. It was built to research canard configurations. A high canard is unusual when ahead of the cockpit because it restricts the pilot's field of view too ...


9

In some aircraft, such as the Canadair CP-107 Argus, the control yoke is not actually connected to the ailerons. Rather, they are connected to servo tabs, which are basically small ailerons attached to the rear of the actual ailerons (not to be confused with trim tabs, which look exactly the same but are controlled differently). Turning the yoke left causes ...


9

While this is an interesting idea, there are some key issues with it. As a GA pilot, here are my issues with that concept. Changing flap settings causes signifigant differences in aircraft handling. If I was, say, on short final, and I changed my aircraft's configuration - it would be difficult to maintain a stable approach profile to the runway. If I were ...


8

They're fixed. The maintenance manual shows the rigging of the pitch/roll moving only the conventional elevators/ailerons. An Air Force Magazine issue—since it's also operated by the USAF under the designation C-12J—spells it out: ... auxiliary fixed horizontal tail surface (stabilon)... For the general principle, see: How does an aircraft tailplane work?...


8

According to a F16 forum.. Those are the LEF's (leading edge flaps). They are there to produce extra lift to the wings during high AOA and low airspeeds. The reason they are up on the ground is they are wired to the left and right main WOW (weight on wheels) switches. They are schedule to -2 degrees on the ground. The only time they move on the ground is ...


7

Hopefully while this is happening, the airplane is in trim and more or less wants to continue where it's headed. Say the airplane was in trim at 150kt and you had power set for level flight at trim speed. If the trim system still works, you still have significant pitch control, because you can vary the speed that airplane wants to fly at and you have power ...


7

Yes, but. Flaps will change the pitch equilibrium to nose-up when moved up, so when you want to increase your lift coefficient, you need to reduce the maximum lift coefficient to make the airplane pitch up. This makes flaps much less suitable for take-off and landing than the elevator, but you can control airplanes with flaps only under some conditions. You ...


6

Your best source for such information (for e.g. simulation purposes) is the maintenance manual. I found one* for the 210 and T210 series (1977 to 1984, which includes the N model; models overview): AILERON TRAVEL Up 20° ±2° Down 15° ±2° WING FLAP TRAVEL (Electrically-Actuated) 0° ±0° to 30°, +1° -2° RUDDER TRAVEL (Measured parallel to water line) Right ...


6

Yes it has differential stabilators. Below is a description from the F/A-18's (A/B/C/D) NATOPS flight manual. Almost every surface including the flaps and leading edge devices are used in rolling the aircraft (fly-by-wire magic): 2.8.2.8 Control Augmentation System (CAS). The lateral control system uses ailerons, differential trailing edge flaps, ...


6

Are there any high-wing aircraft with a top or bottom mounted canard? No one could deny that the Aviafiber CANARD 2 FL was a (very!) high-winged aircraft with a forward-mounted canard. The wing was mounted very high above the fuselage on long diagonal struts, while the canard was at the level of the fuselage. For photos, visit http://www.delta-club-82.com/...


5

Well, it's the same reason that the Challenger ultralight demonstrates extreme "adverse yaw" in response to aileron inputs when flown with the doors on, but less so when flow with the doors off. The floats-- like the doors-- increase the surface area in front of the CG, which has an effect similar to decreasing the size of the vertical fin (which, ...


4

The rearward shifting center of pressure in the transonic regime is the culprit, which messes with the balance, though there seems to be workarounds: [...] the rearward shift in center of pressure at transonic speeds has made the problem of achieving balanced hinge moments throughout the speed range difficult. Such was the case for the horn-balanced, flap-...


4

Vortex generators can be used at the leading edge to energize flow and delay separation. They are widely used as an add-on device to improve low speed behaviour of a range of light aircraft, and in that usage they have a similar effect to a slot or slat in that they both increase stalling AOA and improve aileron response in the stall. I call them "poor ...


2

Can you use control surfaces to control an aircraft? Yes. Are flaps controls a way to control the control surfaces? Yes. Can you use them to control an aircraft? Yes. Could you land this way? Possibly. Is this something you should try? No. Flaps are a slow, clumsy and coarse method to modify your control surfaces and there are all sorts of attendant ...


2

There have been cases like this. One of the most successful incidents occurred in Baghdad when DHL A300 was shot with a manpad. Airbus has published a neat study of the case with analysis. Basically AC will enter a long, low frequency phugoid oscillating around trimmed speed. You forget the speed and fly the pitch with thrust. https://www.smartcockpit.com/...


2

Most pilots would go through whatever procedures they could to free up the controls, including improvising or forcing things. After that the only thing left is to perhaps attempt some sort of spiritual reconciliation if they are moved to do so. Pilots face death the same way other mortals do...


2

That coukd very well be, with the up-going aileron in the “shade” of the wing’s upper surface. The adverse yaw effect from aileron hooking described in this answer mentions that the effect depends on angle-of-attack or camber of the wing. At zero AoA and zero camber there would be no yawing moment due to aileron deflection.


2

This tells the maintenance mechanics what trim state the elevator is in without having to run the pitch trim motor back and forth from the cockpit.


1

A321's flight controls check via YouTube They indeed do on the A321. To be precise, what you saw happens during the roll function (banking left/right), not the slowing down and spoiling lift functions. Here's an extract from the A321's flight manual: ROLL CONTROL [...] The maximum deflection of the spoilers is: 35 ° for spoilers 2, 4, and 5 7 ° for ...


1

Edges like these reduce drag. They originated on Falcon9, where they fold away on ascent and fold out on return. BUT, on Starship they don't fold away, saving the mass of the folding mechanism AND incurring the drag of flat edges on the way up. @ElonMusk. Rotating the pointy edges to face upwards during launch will likely save drag on the way up too. Then ...


1

Tilting the rotor would not work! The cyclic (and you could replace the swashplate with electric motors, but it would still be cyclic controls, just less reliable) works by shifting the centre of lift over the area covered by the rotor, and can shift it by significant fraction of the blade length. This is necessary to compensate for the effect of forward ...


1

You are pretty much describing a fly-by-wire rotor control system. You could certainly do that by using a slip-ring electrical connection at the base of the hub through which you power and control electrically powered servos that regulate blade pitch, with an elastomeric hub allowing for lead/lag and flapping as with most modern helicopter rotors. With ...


1

Nature provides the perfect answer with soaring bird's slow flight wingtips, as seen with condors and eagles, the slot. Leading edge devices do increase Coefficient of Lift and do increase stall Angle of Attack, but placing the slot directly in front of the aileron effectively makes it a separate 2nd wing with its own airflow. This Junkers design was first ...


1

Even if we disregard the problems current flap systems have if they were to be used as flare controls (speed of operation, lag, discrete positions), and assumed they could be controlled in the same manner as flaps, there are still (at least) two major downsides: Flaring with pitch control (the elevator) is superior in simplicity. Just pull on the stick or ...


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