33

It is never “the first time”. What he is really saying is that after many hours of flying the aircraft (or an approved simulator) this is the first time doing a revenue flight with passengers. Previous flights would have been training flights. When a new aircraft type is first introduced to an airline, it can be expected that the entire crew is doing their ...


19

These "direct" flights are actually not unusual, at least in the US. I was surprised by this discovery based on the routes I personally tend to fly, but fortunately we have the Bureau of Transportation Statistics to provide objective information. Using the July 2019 data for all major carriers, I identified direct flights by counting multiples of ...


16

Two reasons: It is way faster and allows one person with a relatively cheap-to-run R-22 to do the work of several cowboys. You're paying for the cowboy 24-7 if they are on staff, which is usually the case on a sprawling and remote ranch/station where you have to keep them on full time (and the horse if using them); you're only paying for the machine (...


16

Just to point out the obvious: This got me thinking, does it ever happen that two pilots take their first passenger flight on a given type together You don't even have to know anything about aviation to be able to answer this question. You can answer this question with common sense and basic logic: If it's a new aircraft type, then by definition, nobody ...


15

[D]oes it ever happen that two pilots take their first passenger flight on a given type together [...]? Yes, it does. In fact, it happened in exactly that flight you linked: Found out that it was the first passenger flight for all of us pilots, but everything went perfect thanks to Scandinavian cooperation and teamwork. (YouTube video description, ...


13

These are known as “direct” flights. They aren’t popular because each stop adds an hour or more to the travel time for through passengers, so they are significantly slower than non-stop flights yet little better than a connection. This actually used to be the norm, but in the last few decades most larger airlines have moved to a “hub and spoke” model with ...


10

My answer considers EASA (European) rules. As a general rule after a transition training in simulator, there is line-flight training in real aircraft. That is flying with (experienced) instructor, although there are passengers onboard. The length of this line-flight training depends on previous experience of the trainee, but it cannot be omitted. After line-...


6

Yes, such arrangements are not uncommon in routes served by commuter airlines and smaller regional carriers. At a stop, the "through" passengers remain seated while others deplane and new passengers enter.


5

Plain and simple, to meet current market requirements, Airbus can do pretty much nothing to make the 380 more "current". The technical improvements suggested do nothing to change the fact that the 380 is too big, that is, it has too many seats, thus not allowing enough flexibility in this market situation. In addition to not addressing the main ...


5

The answer here is, potentially yes, but it depends. In the United States the Federal Aviation Administration casts a wide net out over all kinds of activity it sees a potentially commercial in nature. Former FAA lawyer Kathy Yodice wrote an AOPA article on what the FAA considers compensation or hire activity. Unfortunately, the answer is not always clear;...


5

For the very first flight of a new type at a given airline, obviously none of the pilots will have flown it with passengers before, though that crew will have undergone extensive training in sims and empty planes. However, that is a very rare case. In general, a new pilot (either to that type or to the airline as a whole) will only be paired with certain ...


4

As others have pointed out, “direct“ flights do exist. The airline will have the same plane travel from one city to another with a stop or two along the way. On those flights some passengers will disembark at the stop as that is their destination. Other passengers will get on at the stop to go on to the other destination. Flying out of Love Field, this ...


4

It doesn’t matter whether the pilot rents, leases or owns the plane; if they are offering “aviation services” to the “general public”, then they are “holding out” and would need an Air Operator Certificate.


4

Yes, they do vary between different countries. The international standard for regulations is created by ICAO, but member nations are free to deviate from ICAO rules and several do. ICAO currently limits retirement age to 60 for single-person crew, 65 for multi-person crew, and an exception to 70 for balloon or sailplane. EASA did a study in 2019 in response ...


3

Aside from the economy of scale effect of a large aircraft vs a small one you can compare apples for apples by looking at the same type used on both roles. The Canadair CRJ200 was sold as both a regional airliner and a corporate jet, called the Challenger 850, so it makes a good comparative example. The Challenger 850, being, mechanically, a CRJ200 with a ...


3

The FAA has answered the meaning of §61.113 through an Advisory Circular, legal interpretations and NTSB cases. AC 61-142 Sharing Aircraft Operating Expenses in Accordance with 14 CFR §61.113(c) The FAA uses four criteria to determine if a flight was a commercial operation The holding out or willingness to transport persons or property from place to place ...


3

That's just because of your city-pairs. What you're really saying is "Everytime I fly, I must go to an intermediate "hub" airport and change planes". That's not true for everyone, it's just (all due respect) true for you, because of the airlines and city-pairs that you do fly. It's actually perfectly common for an airline to have a "...


3

why are they so unusual? You could turn the question around and ask why bus and train companies run sectors where the vehicle is mostly empty and making a loss. Often it's because the city requires a minimum level of service for remote areas as part of the franchise. Also, it's cheap and easy for a bus or train to stop and change passengers, but an airline ...


2

MIAT used to regularly fly from Berlin to Ulaanbaatar with a stop in Moscow. All of the passengers had to get off (and on again) in Moscow, although the plane and quite probably the crew would stay the same.


2

Sure. Flew Amsterdam-Dubai-Jakarta a few years ago that was just that, just the people needing to get off in Dubai did so. Same with a flight a long time ago Amsterdam-Bonaire-Curacao. Fuel stop in combination with letting some passengers on and off.


2

Southwest Airlines in the US does it all the time. Here's a flight from Houston, TX to New York, NY that has a stop in Atlanta, but still only a 5 hr flight end to end. Note the "1 STOP - no plane change" here on the flight listing on their website: And checking on the actual flight tracking shows the stop in Atlanta, but both legs are the same ...


2

It's also common in areas with islands. Many flights into Cape Verde islands hop one or more islands along the way in or out. Apparently it's lucrative enough to hit the airports in the region instead of having seperate flights.


2

You're right. In all but a few situations a commercial pilot is essentially the same as a private pilot(you pay your pre-rata share). In a nutshell a commercial pilot can be paid to work for a carrier(part121/part135) or can be hired by an aircraft owner to fly the owners airplane on behalf of the owner and for the owners direct benefit(e.g. corporate ...


2

Personally, I don't see how it's financially viable in most situations, but I'm guessing it's financially viable in a few situations or when shorthanded. Although horses are expensive to "maintain", almost every ranch already has them. Feed and medical are the two largest expenses, and you're going to be providing that whether or not you are using ...


1

Most of the answers focus on the US, but there are lots of such flights on international routes, at the very least on the Europe-Australia flights operated by European or Australian airlines, most of which have a stop somewhere in South-East Asia (Singapore, Bangkok...). Those flights are long enough that all passengers actually deplane before re-boarding (...


1

This is basically a milk run flight. I'm aware of two: Alaska Airlines runs one in Southeast Alaska from Seattle to Anchorage, and United runs one in the Pacific, from Honolulu to Guam. I've been on the Southeast Alaska one—if you're a through passenger, you don't really have time to get off the plane and use the airport facilities. https://simpleflying.com/...


1

There are various intercontinental, some as extra stop, and some as "triangle flights". E.g. Air Canada going from Canada, to Argentina and then Chile and then to Canada (or the contrary). If you need to go to Chile, you have a stop in Argentina, where there is change of people. But if you stopped in Argentina, at flight back, you will stop in ...


1

Widerøe definitely do this in the north of Norway. You can read about one traveller's experience of the Tromsø-Hasvik-Hammerfest-Honningsvåg-Mehamn-Vadsø-Kirkenes "milk run" here: https://simpleflying.com/flight-review-wideroes-explore-norway-pass-land-of-the-midnight-sun/ Here in Finland, I know that (pre-Covid, anyway) one of the Helsinki-Kemi ...


1

FedEx Flight 705, a DC-10-30 cargo plane, flew at 140 degrees (40 deg off being level inverted) after an attempted hijacking. The FO, Jim Tucker, flew the plane inverted to attempt to throw the would-be hijacker off-balance. The hi-jacker was dead-legging, and was worried that he was about to be sacked by FedEx.


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