34

Old propeller airliners were much more prone to "bumpy" ride than modern jets, for one major reason: they flew lower. When I was in my early teens (almost fifty years ago), I flew several times aboard a Beechcraft 99, a low-wing, twin turboprop feeder aircraft with (IIRC) 14 or 18 seats. Unpressurized, and most if not all seats have a pretty good ...


33

It is never “the first time”. What he is really saying is that after many hours of flying the aircraft (or an approved simulator) this is the first time doing a revenue flight with passengers. Previous flights would have been training flights. When a new aircraft type is first introduced to an airline, it can be expected that the entire crew is doing their ...


27

The heating element in cockpit windows is typically a thin film comprised of a transparent conducting oxide - indium tin oxide is common. In thin layers, it is transparent to the visible light spectrum but acts as a mirror in the infrared. As with all transparent conductive films, there will be some tradeoff between transparency and conductivity. Thin-film ...


19

These "direct" flights are actually not unusual, at least in the US. I was surprised by this discovery based on the routes I personally tend to fly, but fortunately we have the Bureau of Transportation Statistics to provide objective information. Using the July 2019 data for all major carriers, I identified direct flights by counting multiples of ...


19

Yes, if you were riding on a DC-7 or Lockheed Constellation, the planes that the first passenger jets replaced, you would be crawling up the walls if you found a modern jet frightening. Lots of noise and vibration from 4 Wright R-3350 radial engines, that belch great clouds of oil smoke when they start (to me, all the noise and smoke is a symphony, but not ...


19

To enlarge upon John K's answer: At night, the exhaust stacks (visible through the windows!) on the DC-7C glowed red-hot and the exhaust gas itself glowed blue and pink as it flowed back along the engine nacelle, flickering all the way to the trailing edge of the wing. This scared the heck out of me in 1960 while flying from LAX to Copenhagen via Winnipeg ...


16

Just to point out the obvious: This got me thinking, does it ever happen that two pilots take their first passenger flight on a given type together You don't even have to know anything about aviation to be able to answer this question. You can answer this question with common sense and basic logic: If it's a new aircraft type, then by definition, nobody ...


15

[D]oes it ever happen that two pilots take their first passenger flight on a given type together [...]? Yes, it does. In fact, it happened in exactly that flight you linked: Found out that it was the first passenger flight for all of us pilots, but everything went perfect thanks to Scandinavian cooperation and teamwork. (YouTube video description, ...


14

There are a few different ways. Probably the most low-tech and widespread is by marshaller guidance, which is a person outside the aircraft guiding the pilots by means of visual signals: The exact hand signals to use are defined by the ICAO, meaning that they are identical no matter where in the world you are flying. Most larger airport have some sort of &...


13

These are known as “direct” flights. They aren’t popular because each stop adds an hour or more to the travel time for through passengers, so they are significantly slower than non-stop flights yet little better than a connection. This actually used to be the norm, but in the last few decades most larger airlines have moved to a “hub and spoke” model with ...


12

I can't tell you how often it happens, but the procedure is quite simple: stop the aircraft immediately, and alert the ground crew. It is then up to the ground crew to decide what, if anything, needs to happen. If the aircraft has just slightly passed the intended stop position, maybe it can just stay where it is. If it has overshot significantly, it may be ...


10

My answer considers EASA (European) rules. As a general rule after a transition training in simulator, there is line-flight training in real aircraft. That is flying with (experienced) instructor, although there are passengers onboard. The length of this line-flight training depends on previous experience of the trainee, but it cannot be omitted. After line-...


9

This does happen. Despite what they'd like you to believe airline pilots are mere mortals, so they occasionally overshoot. Ground crews can mess up instructions as well. I've seen it happen once on a flight I was on, the pilot announced there'd be a short delay because they overshot the gate, in the end there was just enough width on the jetway to ...


9

What language is Boeing's MCAS written in? I believe the Flight Control Computer is a Collins Aerospace FCC-730 with two 16-bit processors. Collins are known to use Ada for at least some of their products. A job advert for Collins stated: Job description: Sr Software Engineer - Flight Controls ... Required Qualifications: ... Experience with C/C++ ... ...


7

Crisis is somewhat hard to define explicitly but the September 11th Attacks had an enormous impact on the commercial aviation industry in perhaps more ways than the current Pandemic has. It took nearly 3 years for aviation travel numbers to return after the attacks and arguably we are still seeing lasting impacts on changes to broad aviation travel ...


6

Yes, such arrangements are not uncommon in routes served by commuter airlines and smaller regional carriers. At a stop, the "through" passengers remain seated while others deplane and new passengers enter.


6

Cost. Those would be expensive, and the business is bad already. Now, you might think that just any mesh, fabric or membrane would do, but but to be effective against the sperad of viruses, nope. Discomfort. Imagine how it would feel to be bagged up like that for hours. Again, despite the membrane being a "breathing" sort, it would still get rather ...


6

In all big air craft, the retraction cycle involves the opening and extension of many bay doors where the gear is stored. Practically it means that initially you will experience an increase in drag when the gear is retracted. We do not want this when close to ground.


6

Short answer - YES. Long answer - Back in about 1995, I was working the airspace around eastern Wyoming and western Nebraska, when Casper FSS (located at Casper, back then) called me about a lost aircraft on their frequency. After a couple of minutes of sorting out reversed position reports (pilot was giving the wrong radial from the NAVAID), I established ...


6

This is a change in the ILS Facility Classification code. In your example the code is I/C/2 for ILS with GP, which means: The ILS category is CAT I Quality of Course C, which means localizer performance follows performance requirements until 100ft Integrity level 2 (see ICAO Annex 10, Volume I for details) The changes can also be found in the Kazakhstan ...


5

For the very first flight of a new type at a given airline, obviously none of the pilots will have flown it with passengers before, though that crew will have undergone extensive training in sims and empty planes. However, that is a very rare case. In general, a new pilot (either to that type or to the airline as a whole) will only be paired with certain ...


5

There's one thing that will forever prevent an unpowered aircraft from entering commercial passenger service: the inability to make a second attempt at a landing. Airliners, with all their instrumentation, very experienced pilots, and such don't make go-arounds frequently -- but especially during weather, they do make go-arounds. A passenger sailplane ...


4

The point of ADFX/ARINC 664 is that it is real time. That means the switch guarantees each type of message will be delivered in specified time according to its priority and allocated bandwidth. For example the control computers probably need to know the inertial reference (attitude and speed) readings every 10 ms, so the switch can be configured to deliver ...


4

Airbus has a dash numbering system that specified the engine manufacturer and the engine variant in addition to the aircraft's series number. The system details can be found here: http://www.aerospaceweb.org/question/planes/q0276a.shtml The general format of the Airbus numbering system is Ammm-sevZ where the individual components are described below. Ammm =...


4

As others have pointed out, “direct“ flights do exist. The airline will have the same plane travel from one city to another with a stop or two along the way. On those flights some passengers will disembark at the stop as that is their destination. Other passengers will get on at the stop to go on to the other destination. Flying out of Love Field, this ...


4

Yes, they do vary between different countries. The international standard for regulations is created by ICAO, but member nations are free to deviate from ICAO rules and several do. ICAO currently limits retirement age to 60 for single-person crew, 65 for multi-person crew, and an exception to 70 for balloon or sailplane. EASA did a study in 2019 in response ...


4

It's hard to prove a negative, but I would say the answer is no for the following reasons: In all my years in the avionics industry, I've never heard of anyone even discussing the possibility (though I realize CAN FD is fairly recent). There are numerous manufacturers that use ARINC 825 which is an adaptation of the basic CAN. The AEEC has no active ...


4

There has not been an actual crash to my knowledge, but I personally have had passenger cell phones interfere with my comm radios several. Once to the point where we couldn't hear anything but the interference noise and I had to call the flight attendants to tell them to find the phone and turn it off immediately. The interference stopped soon after that.


4

Situations like this have happend, most recently was MH17 which was shot down over the Ukraine, many airlines up until then were flying over Ukraine with a minimum altitude applied to flights transiting (FL320). And many flights also flew over that week: Aeroflot - 86 flights Singapore Airlines - 75 flights Ukraine International Airlines - 62 flights ...


3

The C-130, or L-382 (commercial variant) can start the 2nd & 3rd engines simultaneously using the combined bleed air of the APU + the first engine. It was a pretty "gee whiz" trick with limited utility in actual operations, though. Only saw it done a few times in about a decade of flying them. Also don't know if the current J models could do ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible