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0

I would suggest to purchase a training session for A320 in a certified flight simulator like this one, for instance. I understand this is not a real flight, but these simulators feature full scale cockpits with all controls, and the realistic algorithms to simulate the flight itself. A after the instructor giving you an introduction, you will be able to ...


5

I was so close. I was looking at the de Havilland Otter but a mid 50s. A friend finally found it. It is a mid 70s DH-114 de Havilland Riley. Thank you verandaguy for leading to the de Havilland. That was most helpful. Now I can finish the Xmas present and be able to tell my Father-in-law the exact type of plane it came from. Cheers.


11

As a non-professional pilot, to get a ride in the cockpit jumpseat, you'd have to meet at least three conditions: company policy must allow passenger in jumpseat PIC must allow passenger in jumpseat you'd have to be well known and trusted person to either SIC or PIC (preferrably PIC) If you fail to meet any of those, no jumpseat ride for you. So, very slim ...


3

I regrettably inform you that your chances are very slim, outside of actually completing the training required to fly the aircraft. In this world where aircraft terrorism is always a concern, you would have to have a very good reason to convince the captain why he has to put a complete stranger in the cockpit. To the captain, the stranger is simply someone ...


19

It's hugely unlikely. Almost vanishingly unlikely, with few exceptions perhaps for something a little smaller than a passenger-carrying A380 (like a private jet on a repositioning flight where you know the captain well) You used to be able to go up and see the captain on the flight deck - I did it a few times as a kid. Even then asking to sit in the jump ...


1

This is possible. Aside from the question of how the new cockpit elements would fit into the older plane, the most important factors are how it affects performance and safety in the eyes of the regulators, and whether this is worth doing from a cost point of view. A large transport aircraft has a Type Certificate (TC) from the regulator that oversees its ...


4

I'll answer based on the one precedent I'm aware of. Yes. But whether the manufacturer agrees is up to them. In 1996 Saudia ordered 29 MD-90s with MD-11-style cockpits from Honeywell, including the overhead panel. Which Honeywell then supplied for the MD-95 (later renamed Boeing 717) as well. From Honeywell's press release: Saudi Arabian Airlines (...


0

I agree.Should there be any inadvertent throttle retard due to turbulence or runway surface ,the NFP can push them back up.It's SOP in the Navy and Air Force in multiengine side by side cockpits. It also guards against inadvertent throttle retard due to failure of the seat adjustment slides during the catapult shot( S-3 Vikings,E2C Hawkeyes,C-2 Greyhounds,...


9

There is no major problem to be solved by moving the cockpit inside. The canopy adds minimal drag, considering how much drag the whole of a fighter's airframe produces. It also offers the highest quality of vision. To expand on the latter, let's define a few items that go into visual quality: Field of view Acuity, including in motion Noise Dynamic range ...


6

In addition to all the other reasons: Every camera-to-screen system has lag. Lag in a dogfight can be fatal. There will be some distortion between the camera and the screen, no matter how well designed. Distortion can be fatal too. Cameras and screen cannot reproduce depth perception (yes there are ways to do it but they are a LOT more complicated than ...


4

The human eye is 576 Megapixels. When a helmet mounted "virtual reality" type of helmet display comes out some day, in conjunction with cameras and hardware that can record and process at that resolution, then you might see a canopy-less fighter. By that time, the pilot will be software, or at minimum, located remotely anyway.


6

Unless you can have a continuous display over the entire field of vision WITH fail-safes I dont think it'll ever happen. Anything less will either require transitioning from one display(screen) to another or from display to display. If you've ever used a car GPS you will know the lag in shifting from the in-car display to outside view. Mark 1 eyeball is ...


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