49

The light is a tail-strike indicator. Touched Runway system The Touched Runway system provides a warning light in the flight compartment. It illuminates when the aft fuselage makes hard contact with the runway on take off or landing. The system consists of a frangible1 switch located at the bottom of the aft fuselage, activating the ...


23

Depends on the system in question, but typically the following indications will serve as a means to verify that a system is functioning correctly. Activation lights - some cockpit switches will illuminate when commanded by crew. Granted this only can serve as an indication that the switch was engaged. Indicator lights eg landing gear position lights, etc -...


21

To supplement Transistor's answer: The reason for the light is that tailstrikes are very easy to do on the 400 due to the stretch of the rear fuse with not enough landing gear lengthening to compensate, so they are more limited to the deck angle when landing and taking off than most a/c. This isn't a problem on the other shorter -8s and is mostly unique to ...


19

From the same channel and also an A340 at 4:26 in this video the standard '100' can be heard. The reason is a built-in timeout, if a certain time elapses between callouts—say due to non-standard [shallower] descent rate, perhaps due to high headwind for example—the current height is called out. In other words, you get to hear a callout at regular intervals. ...


18

Interesting question. Unfortunately, I couldn't locate the part in the P-51D/K parts catalog, but, if an E-bay seller is to be believed, it had an E-2 Faraday horn, which appears to be an electrically actuated alarm. Faraday is (was) the name of an alarm manufacturer most commonly known for their fire alarms. Based on a history paraphrased from cteksys....


11

All flight guidance functions and their changes are shown on the Flight Mode Annunciator (FMA) and have corresponding switches on the Flight Control Unit (FCU). The buttons on the FCU are usually lit when activated, and the mode is shown on the FMA. Other systems, like pumps, generators etc. have pushbuttons that are lit when activated (or deactivated, ...


5

There are 7 conditions, not 5. The two you are missing are: AUTO BRAKE This warning is when the auto brake system (ABS) has detected a fault, or the system is not activated. AUTO SPOILER This warning is when the spoilers are not armed when the ABS is set to takeoff. What flap setting triggers the warning? Flaps lever position does not agree with ...


5

The stall warning needs to be an immediate attention-getting alarm that you react to promptly and accurately. If you routinely hear it on landing roll-out or during taxi, and 9,999 times out of 10,000 your reaction has been to cancel it, then on that one time (or less) in a career that you're hearing it for real, there would be a real risk of cancelling it ...


5

Stall warning was inhibited below 60 knots airspeed, in order to eliminate nuisance warnings during taxi and other situations. It is well below the stall speed of an A330 in cruise configuration: landing speed with flaps extended is in order of 135 knots; stall speed in landing configuration would be in order of magnitude of 120 knots; stall speed in cruise ...


4

The Rockwell Collins EGPWS, that is probably the most widely used system (you can tell right away by the voice that sounds exactly like the character "Data" from Star Trek - Next Generation; I'd swear it's the same actor's voice) comes with the full range of callout altitudes/heights and airlines pick and choose which ones they want by "configuration ...


4

As I understand it, pilot must pull the red handle and twist 90 degrees. This will stop the engine. Pilot must then press the discharge squib button in order to deploy the extinguishers. is this correct? Yes, this is correct, except that the handle does not need to be twisted as far as I know. When the handle is pulled, the following things will happen: ...


3

If it's the flap closing, you should be able to verify that from the APU ECAM page. Based on the time frame you mentioned, most likely it's the simulated overspeed, which is part of the shutdown sequence and is basically the signal that closes the fuel solenoid (which you can also verify from the APU page). APU flap closing comes later. For more on the ...


3

The WINDSHEAR INOP light tells the pilots that the Predictive Windshear System cannot work: System Annunciator Lights [...] An amber WINDSHEAR INOP annunciator is installed on the annunciator panel. This light illuminates any time the windshear systems detects a fault which renders the system inoperative. (MD-80 FCOM Sec. 16 - ...


3

Yes, that must be an airline option. My Boeing 737 NG FCOMv2 says (15.20.17 Warning Systems - System Description): Approach Callouts Radio Altitude Callouts The GPWS provides the following altitude callouts during approach: 2,500 feet – TWENTY FIVE HUNDRED 1,000 feet – ONE THOUSAND 500 feet – FIVE HUNDRED 100 feet – ONE HUNDRED ...


2

If the ALT switch is not closed, but the BATT switch is closed, battery power is allowed to flow through the ALT FIELD breaker, through the Over Voltage warning light, and grounds through the Over Voltage Sensor. If both the BATT and ALT switches are closed, current flows through both the ALT switch and maintains battery voltage at both terminals of the ...


1

C152 models until 1978 had a voltage regulator, an over-voltage sensor, and an over-voltage indicator light. See Carlo's answer for the wiring diagram. Starting from 1979, Cessna used an Alternator Control Unit (ACU) (Cessna Service News, 1978). This ACU integrates the regulator, as well as over- and low-voltage sensors. There is no over-voltage indicator ...


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