9

Due to the ongoing runway incursion epidemic, US ATC must hear every aircraft read back certain instructions, including callsign. If you don’t read them back correctly, they’re required to repeat the instruction until you do. No matter how many times it takes. When this rule was first adopted (or at least enforced), a shocking number of pilots couldn’t give ...


5

Aviation can be very unforgiving at times. One of the ways to deal with that are so-called idiot proof systems. Checklists are a good example. The reason we use them is not to help us remember what to do, but to make it impossible for us to forget what to do, as long as we can get ourselves to remember to use the checklists. "Read back all instructions&...


4

Great question. The short answer to your question is "Full Time." Ultimately that Class D airspace will be incorporated into the LAX Class B, but there is a lot of red tape involved so step one was to add the Class D extensions, then it will be incorpoated into LAX Class B at a later date. Its a big deal, Title 14 CFR Part 71 had to be amended, ...


4

The triangular area you’re referring to is actually the LAX class D airspace. The heliport itself is uncontrolled. It is not that uncommon for an uncontrolled heliport or airport to be within the surface area of a controlled airport. Departing aircraft are required to contact tower as soon as practical after takeoff, and arriving aircraft are told that ...


4

To answer the question in the title, the AIM 4-3-2 says: When operating at an airport where traffic control is being exercised by a control tower, pilots are required to maintain two-way radio contact with the tower while operating within the Class B, Class C, and Class D surface area unless the tower authorizes otherwise. Initial callup should be made ...


3

Contacting Approach is not required for VFRs unless the D tower’s ATIS says so. For instance, while you won’t find it on the charts, A/FD or NOTAMs, the ATIS at KADS always says “contact Regional Approach on 124.3 and advise you have information [letter]” rather than the usual “advise on initial contact you have information [letter]”. If you try calling ...


2

I fly out of Addison, McKinney, Mesquite, Denton, Rockwall, Sulphur Springs and Aero Country a lot. I am also friends with the A&P located at Airpark. If you would like a safety pilot who knows the local area, maybe we can hook up. A few things to remember when operating out of airpark: The runway is barely maintained. But, it is not perfectly smooth. ...


2

Because class D is controlled airspace. While you are correct that VFR-IFR separation is not provided in class D airspace, the major advantage compared to class E airspace is that, because VFR is subject to a clearance, ATC knows exactly where all VFR aircraft are, enabling ATC to provide very accurate traffic information and/or collision avoidance. So why ...


2

Your First Question: In the US, are weather-reporting requirements for an airport in Class D airspace more stringent than for an airport in surface-level Class E airspace? Answer: The "Primary" airport within active Class D airspace requires (Ref: FAA Order JO 7400.2M, paragraphs 17-2-9 and 17-2-10: That a Control Tower be currently in operation; ...


1

Failure to readback runway assignments and hold short instructions is still a common occurrence. Enough so that the brief moments taken by including the reminder on ATIS are nothing, when compared to the time taken to query pilots, and make second transmissions, to elicit the necessary information. It only takes one error (did he say hold short, the left, ...


1

The area in that dashed magenta line is called an "extension". It is Class E airspace that goes all the way down to the surface. Related: In the US, how does the distinction between E2 and E3/E4 airspace affect pilots?. The point being that there is some ambiguity whether or not certain rules apply within the airspace you are talking about here, ...


1

If you are departing an uncontrolled airport within the surface area of a controlled airport, then you are required to contact the latter airport's control tower as soon as practical. In the particular case of F69 and ADS, since the former is almost directly under the instrument approach path to the latter, you will also want to turn east (i.e. away from the ...


1

There should be no reason or need to enter the bravo. I would listen to KADS ATIS to determine winds and direction of landing, then simply give tower a call and tell them you are inbound to F69. For a specific example: “Addison tower, Skyhawk N123Y 10 miles northeast, information Bravo, inbound for Air Park (F69).” They will probably come back and ask you ...


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