89

While still in the airspace, you should contact the controller if you can, since it may be important to safety. After landing, you may get the dreaded phone number from a controller (probably tower or ground) which you're supposed to call and speak with someone from the FAA. You should not volunteer any information about the incident during this call ...


54

I've done it three times in 1200 hours of flying, I must admit. First time, my plane was performing better than usual (conditions were just right) and I nicked the SFO airspace on climb-out. About 20 minutes later, they called me with a phone number to call when I landed. Spent the rest of the flight shitting bricks. When I got to my destination, I was ...


39

Just call up ATC on the approach frequency and request flight following to see the location you're interested in. They'll assign you a transponder code and any restrictions. For example: N12345: "Houston approach, VFR request for Cessna 12345" Houston TRACON: "Cessna 345, say request" N12345: "Cessna 12345 is at 1200 ft, 3 miles south of ...


21

This is a great question. For those who are unfamiliar, and in areas where airspace is complex, it’s sometimes useful to look at the VFR Flyway Chart. This is the one on the back of FAA Terminal Area Charts. The dashed blue outlines surround the crazy cutouts that are Seattle’s Class D airspaces. Why does KBFI stick into the KSEA Class B? Class D airports, ...


20

T is used to signify that the top of Class C airspace that lies under Class B is the bottom surface of that airspace. This is important when the Class C segment lies under multiple layers of Class B, where no single top altitude applies.


19

On my first cross-country as a student (dual), we actually transitioned through the class B airspace just north of us, flew to a smaller airport north of town, did a landing there, followed by flying back to the class B and landing at the primary airport there before returning home. Basically, I had a few key experiences: The controllers work quickly and ...


19

According to the post at LiveATC, Newark was closed, apparently due to smoke in the tower. With the airport closed, nobody could be granted clearance to take off or land. Outside of declaring an emergency, there's nothing the pilot(s) could have done to get clearance at Newark other than just waiting. In an emergency situation like smoke in the tower, ...


17

A "Counseling Session" is the lightest slap on the wrist the FAA can give you (aside from doing nothing). Basically it means "you screwed up, you know you screwed up, and we (the FAA) know you know you screwed up" -- they just want to sit you down with someone from the FSDO (probably a FAA Safety Team representative) and have a conversation to make sure ...


17

There are several big differences between working around a Class B airport versus a Class C. Explicit clearance required. Operation in Class C airspace simply requires establishing two-way contact with the airport approach prior to entry. Now, it's good manners either way to request entry or indicate your plans involve entry; while it's legal to transition ...


17

The answer has to do with ATC's separation requirements. In Class D airspace, VFR aircraft are not afforded any kind of separation. Mandatory traffic advisories and safety alerts are provided between VFR/VFR and VFR/IFR traffic. In Class C airspace, VFR aircraft are provided target resolution laterally ("dots don't touch") or 500' vertically ...


12

There are in fact two airports in the cutout: An unmarked field (A in top map) just east of Platte City (see below) that corresponds to the NW limit of the cutout. Note that this edge of the cutout appears to parallel the main runway at MCI. The private Elton Field (B in top map). In the image below, field is boxed in red and runway in blue. And there's ...


12

You can start many "what does this thing on an FAA chart mean" questions with the FAA's Aeronautical Chart User's Guide. It doesn't go into a deep explanation, but does show it as an example in this case. The symbol can be found on page 17 of the 2018 guide. The figure at left identifies a sector that extends from the surface to the base of the ...


11

There certainly are similar routes - the Niagara Scenic Falls route, given in FAR 93.71 comes to mind. (FAR 93 has plenty of these, by the way.) Comply with the following procedures when conducting flight over the area described in paragraph (a) of this section: (1) Fly a clockwise pattern; (2) Do not proceed north of the Rainbow Bridge; ...


11

Yes, there is a legal interpretation on this: [...] under the express language of the regulation, aircraft operating in the airspace underlying Class B airspace - irrespective of whether the underlying airspace is controlled or uncontrolled - may not exceed the 200-knot speed limitation So it is indeed any and all ...


11

The pilot means: I'll be back again, so please don't assign this code to someone else. Less workload for a pilot going in and out of class-B airspaces, and less hassle for the controllers, so they don't keep assigning a different code to the same plane. The pilot will switch to the VFR code (1200 in the USA), and then use the one he's written down and used ...


9

Since VFR flight plans are only used for SAR, and your route would only matter if you aren’t talking to ATC, I would file the route you intend to take if ATC denies you the B transition—or refuses to talk to you entirely. If they do talk to you and grant the transition, then there will be a clear record of your actual path, and nobody will bother to look at (...


8

The Class D airspace surrounding the Olive Branch airport extends upward to 2900 feet msl, excluding the Class B airspace. So, your understanding is correct. Here is the official description of this Class D airspace from FAA Order 7400.11, Airspace Designations and Reporting Points: (emphasis is mine) ASO MS D Olive Branch, MS Olive Branch Airport,...


8

In answer to your specific question, as I understand you are asking, I would just put in the intended route (e.g., Bay Shore Transition) in the "route of flight" section and the route outside of class B airspace in the "Other Information" section.(annotating it as another potential route you might fly). But keep in mind, for a VFR flight, ...


8

For a large class B complex, the same approach control frequency may be working aircraft both inside and outside the B, with some of those outside the B in a class C or D. Establishing communication with ATC is sufficient to enter the C or D unless the controller says no, but you still have to keep out of the B unless they say yes. If the rule were the same ...


7

Yes: If you combine the two sections provided by SMSvonder Tann and Raaj Tram you get: 14 CFR 91.215 - ATC transponder and altitude reporting equipment and use: (b)(4) All aircraft in all airspace above the ceiling and within the lateral boundaries of a Class B or Class C airspace area designated for an airport upward to 10,000 feet MSL; and ...


6

AIM 7−4−1. Migratory Bird Activity a. Bird strike risk increases because of bird migration during the months of March through April, and August through November. b. The altitudes of migrating birds vary with winds aloft, weather fronts, terrain elevations, cloud conditions, and other environmental variables. While over 90 percent of the reported bird ...


6

Yes, an ultralight aircraft operated under 14 CFR 103 can be operated within the "Mode C Veil" within the limitations of §103. As you note, 14 CFR 91—including §91.215, ATC transponder and altitude reporting equipment and use—does not apply to ultralights governed by §103. The limitations of §103 do generally prohibit: operations over congested areas; ...


6

As a Bay Area pilot, I've wondered this too. It appears to be an unofficial but widely-understood local custom, similar to the not-always-charted VFR reporting points commonly in use at many local airports. Moreover, it seems there isn't just one "Bay Tour". Instead, I think that phrase generally tells the controllers that you're on a sightseeing flight ...


6

Since the Class C airspace is sandwiched between the surface and the shelves of the nearby Class B airspace, the T indicates that the upper limit of the ClassC surface area is on the bottom of the overhead Class B shelf.


5

There is not one official "Bay Tour" flight route. However, there are general guidelines to follow. This local flight instructor's site explains this and offers suggestions of where you can get a map. Here is a flight briefing for one possible route. In general, there are VFR Flyway Planning Charts that you can use in certain areas of the country. San ...


5

That specific phrasing means that you can't touch a cloud. See the VFR minimums in 14 CFR 91.155, where it says: no person may operate an aircraft under VFR when the flight visibility is less, or at a distance from clouds that is less, than that prescribed for the corresponding altitude and class of airspace in the following table [...] The table ...


5

In general, no, you can't. Public (Governmental) Use The FAA maintains a page on Public Operations of UASs. There are a couple of ways governmental organizations (excluding the armed forces) can fly a UAS: It can fly in accordance with the limitations set out in Public Law 112-95 Title I, Subtitle B, Section 334 (c)(2)(C), which are that the FAA will: (...


5

You'll sometimes get radio phraseology different from what is published on charts either due to some holdover from now-superseded procedures (bad form, but it happens) or because of Letters-Of-Understanding that exist between the local Air Traffic Facility and certain operators or interest groups/associations, etc. If you're going someplace new and want to ...


5

Is requesting VFR flight following in a class bravo the same thing as requesting a class bravo clearance? No. Flight following just means that the aircraft is receiving traffic advisories. A VFR aircraft needs explicit clearance to enter the Class B. The pilot should net ATC know that they intend to enter the Class B. Does requesting a class bravo airspace ...


5

Short answer; Basically all of them, but for the 7 landing slot airports you might need to pre-arrange your arrival. It really depends what is going on at the airport, how willing you are to pay the fees, and if you feel confident handling the radio chatter as well as some possibly complicated taxi instructions. Pretty much all airports support some kind of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible