29

That's pretty much the checkride in a nutshell - for all the details on what's expected you should refer to the FAA Practical Test Standards for the rating you're pursuing. Before your checkride At some point before your checkride you must take a "knowledge test" (the "written exam") - you must pass that exam in order to qualify to take the checkride (the "...


25

This thread should be a great source of tips and tricks :) The way to think about this is to think about the purpose of being asked to divert during your checkride. What the examiner will be looking for is not that you have all of the information for every possible airport you might be asked to fly to. The examiner is wanting to see that if you had to ...


22

In general, you get one free go-around. First of all, any checkride which involves short-field landings probably also involves demonstrating go-arounds. If you don't do one on your own, your examiner will have to ask to see one later. Going around when it's obvious you're not going to make your point demonstrates good judgment. It shows that you're not ...


21

The regulatory basis for the exam comes from 49 USC 44709 (hence the name), which states: (a) The Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration may reinspect at any time a civil aircraft, aircraft engine, propeller, appliance, design organization, production certificate holder, air navigation facility, or air agency, or reexamine an airman holding ...


15

In short, No. I messed up both my short field, and soft-field landings. I properly called and executed a go-around, and hit the landings on the second tries. The examiner passed me, and gave me credit for executing properly when the landing couldn't be saved. I think the important thing that he called out after the flight is that a Private Pilot's License ...


13

You will be examined in 3 ways, written, oral and practical. The checkride consists of only the oral and practical portions of the exams. The written is computer based and must have been completed with the 2 years preceding the checkride. When you complete the written you will get a sheet that is stamped and embossed certifying your score and listing your ...


13

Keegan, I understand you may not want to specify where you had difficulty, but without knowing that, I'm afraid it's going to be difficult for anyone to help direct you. Let me throw out two thoughts: 1) If you failed on regulatory questions, that is a lot like studying for a spelling bee. Reading, retention, and repetition is hard work, but required. 2) ...


13

AOPA has a great article about this, and it basically says: Since you failed the oral, more studying is probably in order. You will need to receive training in the area(s) of the checkride that you failed from a flight instructor. Once the flight instructor feels that you are proficient and able to pass the checkride, they will sign your logbook so that you ...


13

First, let's see whether it's legal. FAA Order 7110.118 notes that: 7. EXPLANATION OF CHANGES. The following changes apply to all LAHSO. a. ... b. Solo student pilots will not conduct LAHSO. However, you could interpret that as not applicable to your situation, as you are not the sole occupant of the aircraft: 14 CFR §61.87 (a)...


13

I think you are getting worked up about something that isn't a problem. DPEs are incentivized to develop a professional reputation that upholds appropriate standards, while passing those who meet the standard. Someone who is motivated by greed to fail students as you suggest would quickly get a bad reputation and people would simply stop scheduling check ...


12

No, you shouldn't fail if you're going around for a valid reason and the go-around is well executed. If you're well prepared, the way you operate on the checkride should be how you would operate if the examiner was any other passenger. If you take a look at the Practical Test Standards for Airplane (FAA-S-8081-14B), there are a couple of areas that help ...


10

I did a go around on the short field for my PPL checkride. I was floating too much and even with a slip and s-turn I couldn't make it. So I went around and tried again. On my second try I turned base further downwind so I had a long final. Then I dragged it in for a spot on landing. The DE asked me if I knew why I was floating so much and I told him I had a ...


8

As far as I'm aware you can't pull the "completed" application from IACRA (with the examiner's notice of disapproval & failed areas on it). Much like with your knowledge test report you need to hang on to that original bit of paper. I don't believe you NEED to bring the Notice Of Disapproval with you to a retest though. 61.43 says, in part: f) If a ...


8

Not technically. You could opt to surrender your private pilot certificate to the FAA thus making you not a pilot, and then you could take a checkride for recreational. Of course, there is no reason to do this at all! You can do the same things as long as you're exercising the privileges of the lower certificate, then whatever medical rules are there ...


8

How much of the above is accurate? You take the written exam before you take the checkride. When you pass the written, the proctor will give you a piece of paper that proves you passed, you need to show that to the DPE before the checkride. In my case, when I called the DPE to schedule the checkride, he asked me to plan a cross country flight to an ...


8

Legally, you can take your instrument rating checkride (not "IFR checkride") in an airplane that is not equipped for flight under instrument flight rules. That is because you will fly your check ride under VFR. As I did. The examiner will act as "safety pilot," a require crew member, while you are the sole manipulator of the controls under SIMULATED IMC via ...


7

Unfortunately, yes. It is part of the checkride and if you don't finish it within the required time you will need to take the entire checkride again. The commercial PTS shows the areas of operations that are included in the checkride, and the oral itself is given throughout the entire process. What most people consider "the oral" is the examiner asking ...


7

Alright so here is the outcome: I called FSDO, spoke with a real nice guy who told me to give him a call if I couldn't handle this online. Called a zillion bureaucracies, all telling me to call someone else. Called the nice guy at FSDO, set up an appointment for a name correction not a name change. Went to the appointment and was in and out in under an ...


6

I came to the same conclusion as you, I don't see anything keeping you from going. You meet the requirements of 61.107 and 61.109, you have recent experience in both aircraft, and as far as make and model, they're both PA-28's. That's like going from a 172B to a 172S: it's the same make and model, Piper just makes it a little less obvious with their nickname ...


6

Do NOT worry about getting an unsatisfactory result!! It just does not matter. There will be no record of it anywhere but in your memory. It's not noted on your certificate and, really, nobody will care. The PPL is a license to learn and that is what you'll be expected to do after you pass. The checkride merely assesses basic requirements. Now, if you ...


6

In theory it's possible to contact the local FSDO and ask for a checkride with an FAA inspector, and it's free (see here, here, here). But personally I've never heard of anyone doing it and I can't even find anything on the FAA's website about it. The FAA's statistics show that in 2016 there were 34,156 initial checkrides with DPEs but only 465 with FAA ...


6

Yes, but only if the examiner agrees. 61.45 says: (a) General. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section or when permitted to accomplish the entire flight increment of the practical test in a flight simulator or a flight training device, an applicant for a certificate or rating issued under this part must furnish: (1) An aircraft ...


5

I believe PPL also requires some night flying time (at least the 141 school I am at does). I believe Sport Pilot License is not valid at night so you may have to gain some night landings and hours to go for the check ride as well. However I do see that you have all the hours signed off so I will assume this includes night hours. But AFAIK you will need to ...


5

Epilogue: I confirmed with my phase check CFI (and former DPE) that it's no big deal. She noted that the airplane designation "can be lined through" the day of the test. In any case, the PPL doesn't mandate experience in a single type of aircraft, and anything one can fly in a PPL checkride requires instruction and an endorsement, so presumably the type can ...


5

Interesting question. In the past, the preamble to the PTS showed reference material that can be used to throughout the PTS. With the new Airman Certification Standard (ACS), those references are incorporated into each task. For slow flight below it lists the references as FAA-H-8083-2, FAA-H-8083-3 and POH/AFM. Private Pilot Airplane ACS Undoubtedly,...


5

The term "critical engine" can actually refer to two very different factors: P Factor Engine driven accessories, depending on the airplane and how it's configured. A twin with counter-rotating propellers doesn't have a critical engine from a controlability perspective, but very often there are important engine driven accessories, like hydraulic pumps, ...


4

Use the same form you use every other time you go fly with your instructor. If you're at the point of preparing for a check-ride and you have never had a weight and balance form before, you may want to sue your flight instructor (...kidding, kind of). If I approach a new trainer-airplane for the first time, I find out whether someone has made a weight and ...


4

The answer is: you can't plan this. This is done to see how you react while in flight to a non-planned diversion, and can happen anytime in real life. It's used also to evaluate how you manage stressful situations, how you manage both flying the plane and searching through the documentation to find the plate of the new destination. Of course, this means ...


4

Reference: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/49/44709 The regulatory basis appears to be 49 U.S. Code § 44709 - Amendments, modifications, suspensions, and revocations of certificates When might a 709 ride happen: The Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration may reinspect at any time a civil aircraft, aircraft engine, propeller, ...


4

No. Instructor A needs to provide at least three hours of training in preparation of the practical test within two calendar months of the checkride. §61.39   Prerequisites for practical tests. (6) Have an endorsement, if required by this part, in the applicant's logbook or training record that has been signed by an authorized instructor who ...


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